Supplementary AGENDA  1

 

Distributed on 13 February 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Council Meeting

 

TUESDAY 13 FEBRUARY 2018

 

6.30pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEETING AGENDA – PRECIS

SUPPLEMENTARY ITEMS

 

 

The following report/s appear as late item/s with Mayoral approval as information required for the preparation of the report/s was not available at the time of distribution of the Business Paper.

 

 

1          Mayoral Minutes

 

ITEM                                                                                                                                       PAGE

 

C0218 Item 15    Mayoral Minute: Funding for campaigns opposing overdevelopment in Marrickville and along the Sydenham to Bankstown Corridor                                                3

C0218 Item 16    Mayoral Minute: Initiating Consultation about an Appropriate Frontier War Memorial      5

C0218 Item 17    Mayoral Minute: Piloting Aboriginal Language Program in Local Early Learning Centre  6

C0218 Item 18    Mayoral Minute: A Respectful and Inclusive Australia Day Commemoration      8

  


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Council Meeting

13 February 2018

 

Item No:         C0218 Item 15

Subject:         Mayoral Minute: Funding for campaigns opposing overdevelopment in Marrickville and along the Sydenham to Bankstown Corridor           

From:             The Mayor, Councillor Darcy Byrne   

 

 

Motion:

 

THAT COUNCIL:

 

1.   Allocate funding of up to $300 for the production of two banners opposing over-development of the Sydenham to Bankstown corridor;

2.   Letterbox local residents within the catchment of the Sydenham to Bankstown corridor to inform them of the Save Marrickville rally to be held on February 24; and

3.   Provide logistical support and assistance to the organisers of the rally in liaising with the Police to ensure the safety of the event.

 

 

Background

 

The inner west is currently under attack from a State Government that seems intent on poorly planned overdevelopment. The suburb of Marrickville is one of our hardest hit areas.

 

From the Sydenham to Bankstown corridor strategy to the Carrington Road development, Marrickville is being set up by the State Government to absorb extremely high density residential development, with 2,616 units proposed in Carrington Road and  6,000 dwellings for the Marrickville Station Precinct.

 

The Sydenham to Bankstown Working Group which Council established last year has requested that Council provide support for two banners to be erected on Council properties, opposing the Sydenham to Bankstown Corridor Strategy and the Sydney Metro.

Council Officers have advised that the Marrickville Town Hall site is inappropriate for a banner, as hirers have the right to use the banner space to advertise events.

 

The Council depot at Sydenham is appropriate for erection of the Banner. A further suggested site is within Steel Park. Both sites are located within the corridor.

 

It is noted that the Council resolution on the Sydney Metro (Sydenham to Bankstown) EIS (C1117) in part was:

 

“Council does not accept that the case for the Sydney Metro has been adequately made. Our community is not prepared to accept the disruption that would be caused by this project, that we are not convinced will benefit our community or Sydney as a whole.”

 

A separate request has been received from the Save Marrickville action group to provide support for a Save Marrickville Rally on 24 February, primarily aimed at protesting the Mirvac’s Planning Proposal for 4-18 Carrington Road.

 

They have requested Council’s assistance in notifying the community about the rally and in liaising with the Police regarding the event.

 


 

RESOURCING IMPLICATIONS

 

Two banners 3m x 1m - approximately $100 each

Print and distribution of notification letters to the Marrickville Station Precinct and surrounds: $2552.00

 

Council officers have identified that these funds can be drawn from the Strategic Planning advertising budget.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


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Council Meeting

13 February 2018

 

Item No:         C0218 Item 16

Subject:         Mayoral Minute: Initiating Consultation about an Appropriate Frontier War Memorial           

From:             The Mayor, Councillor Darcy Byrne   

 

 

Motion:

 

THAT:

 

1.   Council consult with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Strategic Reference Group, the Metro Land Council and further representatives from the local community about the need, form and location of a Frontier War memorial; and

2.   A report be brought back to council outline the results of this consultation.

 

 

Background

 

From 1788 to as late as 1934, Australia was the site of an ongoing Frontier War.

 

Historians cannot agree on how many people lost their lives as a result of this violence, but the numbers range from 20,000 to 30,000 Indigenous victims and between 2,000-5,000  Europeans. There are historians who say that the numbers may have been much higher.

 

Fighting was very localised. The result was, rather than a single war, an ongoing series of confrontations and massacres across Australia.

 

Between outright violent engagements, massacres and the European introduction of diseases like measles, smallpox and influenza, between 1788 and 1900 the Indigenous population of Australia was reduced by around 90 per cent.

 

The War began in Sydney when the European colonists began establishing farms along the Hawkesbury River in the late 18th Century. In 1801 Governor Phillip Gidley King authorised settlers to shoot Indigenous Australians on sight in Parramatta, Georges River and Prospect areas.

 

In 1814 Governor Macquarie deployed soldiers to the area now known as Campbelltown. Following a drought which escalated tension between the Indigenous and European population, a detachment of soldiers in the area is said to have slaughtered Aboriginal men women and children.

 

The Frontier Wars are yet to be acknowledged as an official war, but it is an historical fact that an ongoing conflict has existed between Indigenous Australians and European settlers.

 

The inner west is rightfully proud of its Indigenous history, and with reconsideration of how to recognise and honour what it means to be Australian, I believe the time is right to consider a prominent local memorial to commemorate the Frontier War.

 

It is essential that Council works closely with the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to determine if the community feels the need for a memorial and, if that is the case, the most appropriate form and location for it.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


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Council Meeting

13 February 2018

 

Item No:         C0218 Item 17

Subject:         Mayoral Minute: Piloting Aboriginal Language Program in Local Early Learning Centre           

From:             The Mayor, Councillor Darcy Byrne   

 

 

Motion:

 

THAT COUNCIL:

 

1.   Allocate $5,000 to the Aboriginal Languages and Culture Program to enable the pilot to proceed;

2.   Request a full copy of the DiverseWerks report as condition of the funding allocation;

3.   Report back to Council regarding the evaluated success of the trial and any appropriate opportunities to trial the program in Council-owned childcare facilities; and

4.   Include in the report a summary of Aboriginal staffing and programs at Inner West Council.

 

 

Background

 

Tillman Park Early Learning Centre has for the past year been laying the groundwork for an Aboriginal Languages and Culture Program for the children attending the Centre.

 

The program will see a Sydney Aboriginal language speaker lead the program with all children and educators at the centre. They will learn Sydney Aboriginal language and culture through song, storytelling and the environment around them.

 

Learning the first language of the region will encourage a connection to the environment and will allow children to nurture a sense of self and place in their world. 

 

Their pilot program will build on practices at the Centre and the curriculum including daily Acknowledgement of Country.

 

The project will be documented and evaluated by DiverseWerks. DiverseWerks is a specialist diversity consultancy that develops tailored solutions that support organisations to harness the benefits of diversity. They have recently built a low cost evaluation tool to support community based organisations to evaluate and report on projects and programs.

 

In 2017 Inner West Council provided $4,000 towards staff development for the program.

This pilot provides an opportunity to trial a program that, if successful, could then be rolled out across the inner west – first in Council childcare facilities and preschools, and then into willing private operators.

 

It would facilitate reconciliation and community cohesion for our community.

 

The Centre requires $10,000 to fully trial and document the program. In 2017 the Tillman Park Parents and Fundraising Committee raised just over $5000 to support the proposed 10-week pilot Sydney Aboriginal Languages and Culture program.

 


 

Financial Implications

 

A $5,000 funding allocation is suggested.

 

The Group Manager Community Services and Culture has identified $5,000 in unexpended funds originally allocated for Poverty Week 2017, which can be reallocated towards this program.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


Header Logo

Council Meeting

13 February 2018

 

Item No:         C0218 Item 18

Subject:         Mayoral Minute: A Respectful and Inclusive Australia Day Commemoration
          

From:             The Mayor, Councillor Darcy Byrne   

 

 

Motion:

 

THAT COUNCIL:

1.   Commend the Events and Civic Reception teams for their work in carrying out the citizenship ceremony, awards ceremony and community event  on January 26 2018;

2.   Staff initiate consultation with the local Aboriginal community, the Metro Land Council and the wider community about how the nature of Council’s January 26 events can further evolve to recognise the history of Indigenous Australia; and

3.   Staff seek to identify possible funding for consultation as part of the Third Quarter Budget Review.

 

 

Background

 

On 26 January Council held an exceptional Australia Day celebration in Enmore Park.

The Events and Civic Reception teams did a wonderful job of organising the day and ensuring that an appropriate, respectful and well attended event took place.

 

A highlight of the 26 January event this year was a moving and respectful Citizenship Ceremony for nearly 60 new Australian citizens.

 

The tone of the citizenship ceremony event was one of reflection and acknowledgement that 26 January marks the beginning of colonisation and a long period of conflict for the Indigenous community.

 

26 January represents for first nations people the beginning of invasion, colonization, dispossession, dissemination of disease, the stealing of children, the deliberate elimination of language and culture are historical acts with very real contemporary consequences.

 

As such, it is a difficult day for many Aboriginal Australians and considered by many to be a day of mourning.

 

The Inner West is proud of its Aboriginal heritage and has been fortunate enough to have been home to many notable Aboriginal figures, such as the trailblazing activist and artist Lester Bostock and legendary entertainer Dr James Oswald “Jimmy” Little AO.

 

At the 26 January event I acknowledged the contribution that amazing citizens like Lester and Jimmy have made to our community.

 

I was also moved to be able to acknowledge Aunty Phemie, a nationally renowned artist and community activist, who has been contributing to the Inner West since before she was even counted as a citizen in this country.

 

On this, the 10th anniversary of the historic day when former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said sorry on the floor of the Nation’s Parliament to the Stolen Generations, it is appropriate for us to consider that the nature of January 26 must change.

 

It should be a day of commemoration, not celebration.

 

It is important that Council takes the lead in creating a ceremony that is more inclusive and allows proper acknowledgement of the first peoples of our country.

 

Council should consult closely with the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to identify, with them, ways in which we can make marking our national day more appropriate and more inclusive.

 

Both Yarra and Darebin Councils in Victoria have voted not to hold an Australia Day ceremony and both have been stripped of their right to hold Citizenship ceremonies.

 

The Inner West Council conducted 11 Citizenship ceremonies during 2017, welcoming approximately 1,000 new Australian citizens.

 

Financial Implications

 

The Engagement Team have advised that a specialist First Nations Engagement Consultancy should be contracted to conduct this sensitive and extensive engagement. Costs are estimated at $10,000.

 

This cost has not been funded, but can be considered as part of the 2017-18 third quarter budget review.

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.