AGENDA R

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Council Meeting

 

TUESDAY 30 OCTOBER 2018

 

6.30pm

 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Live Streaming of Council Meeting

 

In the spirit of open, accessible and transparent government, this meeting of the Inner West Council is being streamed live on Council’s website. By speaking at a Council meeting, members of the public agree to being recorded and must ensure their speech to the Council is respectful and use appropriate language. A person who uses defamatory, discriminatory or offensive language may be exposed to liability for which Council takes no responsibility. Any part of this meeting that is held in closed session will not be recorded

 

Pre-Registration to Speak at Council Meetings

 

Members of the public must register by 2pm of the day of the Meeting to speak at Council Meetings. If you wish to register to speak please fill in a Register to Speak Form, available from the Inner West Council website, including:

 

Are there any rules for speaking at a Council Meeting?

The following rules apply when addressing a Council meeting:

 

What happens after I submit the form?

Your request will then be added to a list that is shown to the Chairperson on the night of the meeting.

 

Where Items are deferred, Council reserves the right to defer speakers until that Item is heard on the next occasion.

 

Accessibility

 

Inner West Council is committed to ensuring people with a disability have equal opportunity to take part in Council and Committee Meetings. At the Ashfield Council Chambers there is a hearing loop service available to assist persons with a hearing impairment. If you have any other access or disability related participation needs and wish to know more, call 9392 5657.

 

Persons in the public gallery are advised that under the Local Government Act 1993, a person may NOT tape record a Council meeting without the permission of Council.

 

Any persons found recording without authority will be expelled from the meeting.

 

“Record” includes the use of any form of audio, video and still camera equipment or mobile phone capable of recording speech.

 

An audio recording of this meeting will be taken for the purpose of verifying the accuracy of the minutes.  

 

 

   


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

 

PRECIS

 

1          Acknowledgement of Country

 

2          Apologies

 

3          Notice of Webcasting

 

4          Disclosures of Interest (Section 451 of the Local Government Act
and Council’s Code of Conduct)
 

 

5          Moment of Quiet Contemplation

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                         Page

Minutes of 9 October 2018 Council Meeting                                                                    5

 

7          Mayoral Minutes

 

Nil at the time of printing.

8          Condolence Motions

 

Nil at the time of printing.

9          Staff Reports

 

ITEM                                                                                                                                    PAGE #

 

C1018(2) Item 1       Financial Statements 2017/18                                                                18

C1018(2) Item 2       Draft Dawn Fraser Baths Master Plan: Feedback from Public Exhibition       19

C1018(2) Item 3       A Healthier Inner West - Office of Sport                                              110

C1018(2) Item 4       Alternative Sites for a Regional Skate Park Facility in the North of the Inner West LGA                                                                                                              113

C1018(2) Item 5       Outcomes from the public exhibition of the Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West.                                                                                                     124

C1018(2) Item 6       Waterfront Sporting Ground-Cricket Nets Location                             273

C1018(2) Item 7       Swimming In Parramatta River - New Site for Inner West                  280

C1018(2) Item 8       Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan for a common customer focussed resource recovery and waste management service                                           290

C1018(2) Item 9       2018/19 Inner West Council Grants Program                                      309

C1018(2) Item 10     Planning Proposal Assessment Report - 1-5 Chester Street, Annandale 362

C1018(2) Item 11     Planning Proposal for 2-6 Cavill Avenue, Ashfield - Supplementary Report on Affordable Housing Delivery Mechanisms                                          713

C1018(2) Item 12     Planning Proposal - Precinct 75- Mary, Edith,Roberts Streets, St Peters 744

C1018(2) Item 13     Affordable Housing for Victoria Road Precinct                                    914

C1018(2) Item 14     WestConnex update report                                                                  920

C1018(2) Item 15     Western Harbour Tunnel Reference Design                                        944

C1018(2) Item 16     City West Cycle Link - Progress Report                                              978

C1018(2) Item 17     Annandale Conservation Area Extension - Public Exhibition              984

C1018(2) Item 18     Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 2 October 2018               1023

C1018(2) Item 19     Compliance and Enforcement Policy and Protocol                           1058

C1018(2) Item 20     Asbestos Policy Update                                                                     1079

C1018(2) Item 21     Adoption of Asset Management Policy                                              1081

C1018(2) Item 22     Investment Report as at 30 September 2018                                    1094

C1018(2) Item 23     Former Council Legacy Policies Rescission                                      1122

C1018(2) Item 24     Adoption of Public Access to Information held by Council Policy     1125

C1018(2) Item 25     Status of Legal Proceedings                                                              1132

C1018(2) Item 26     Land and Environment Court Proceedings - Council ats Eric Findlay – Order to Remove Pony                                                                                    1143

10        Notices of Motion

 

ITEM                                                                                                                                    PAGE #

 

C1018(2) Item 27     Notice of Motion: Councillor Professional Development                   1145

C1018(2) Item 28     Notice of Motion: Pocket Park upgrade                                             1146

C1018(2) Item 29     Notice of Motion: Report on the use of Round Up in Council Parks, Sporting Fields and Playgrounds and Near Waterways                                                    1147

C1018(2) Item 30     Notice of Motion: Prevention of Carparking on Tempe Reserve Recreation Areas                                                                                                            1149

C1018(2) Item 31     Notice of Motion: Summer Hill Public School Spring Fair                 1150

C1018(2) Item 32     Notice of Motion: Ashfield Pool - Ashfield District Historical Society 1151

C1018(2) Item 33     Notice of Motion: Reducing Waste                                                    1153

 

11        Reports with Confidential Information

 

Reports appearing in this section of the Business Paper are confidential in their entirety or contain confidential information in attachments.

 

The confidential information has been circulated separately.

 

ITEM                                                                                                                                    PAGE #

 

C1018(2) Item 34     Cooks River Parklands Upgrade Tender Report                               1155

 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

 

Minutes of Ordinary Council Meeting held on 9 October 2018

 

Meeting commenced at 6.32pm

 

Present:

Darcy Byrne

Victor Macri

Marghanita Da Cruz Mark Drury

Colin Hesse

Sam Iskandar

Tom Kiat

Pauline Lockie

Julie Passas

Rochelle Porteous

John Stamolis

Louise Steer
Rik Hart

Elizabeth Richardson

Mayor

Deputy Mayor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor (6.35pm)

Councillor

Councillor

General Manager

Deputy General Manager Assets and Environment

Michael Tzimoulas

Deputy General Manager Chief Financial and Administration Officer

John Warburton

Deputy General Manager Community and Engagement

Nellette Kettle

 

Harjeet Atwal

Cathy Edwards-Davis

David Milliken

Harin Perera

Ian Naylor

Katherine Paixao

Group Manager Civic and Executive Support, Integration,

Customer Service and Business Excellence

Group Manager Development Assessment & Regulatory Services

Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

A/Group Manager Strategic Planning

Group Manager, Information & Communications Technology

Manager Civic and Executive Support

Business Paper Coordinator

 

APOLOGIES:       

 

Motion: (Stamolis/Kiat)

 

THAT apologies from Clrs McKenna OAM, Raciti and York and lateness from Clr Porteous be accepted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

 

DISCLOSURES OF INTERESTS:  

 

Clrs Iskandar and Macri declared a significant, non-pecuniary conflict of interest in Item 5 - Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel Report: DA201700185: 728 Princes Highway, Tempe as they are members of the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel.

 

Motion: (Byrne/Passas)

 

THAT the declarations of interest be received and noted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Clr Porteous entered the meeting at 6.35pm

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

Motion: (Byrne/Macri)

 

THAT the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on Tuesday, 25 September 2018 be confirmed as a correct record, subject to the following change:

-       An amendment to the voting on the amendment for Item 10 – Councillor Representation on Committees, relating to the nomination of Clr Da Cruz as the representative on the Local Traffic Committee, Clr Lockie voted for the Motion and Councillor Raciti voted against the Motion.

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

 

Amendment (Passas/Porteous)

 

THAT the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on Tuesday, 25 September 2018 be deferred to allow staff to check whether Councillor Stamolis moved a Motion of Dissent in the chairs ruling in Item 6 - Report on the Council Review of the Organisation Structure.

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Passas, Porteous and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri and Stamolis

 

C1018(1) Item 15       Mayoral Minute: Condolence Motion Hayden Mullaney

Motion: (Byrne)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council write a letter of condolence to the family of Hayden Mullaney, expressing our sadness at his passing and thanking them for his service to the inner west community; and

 

  1. Council investigate ways to recognise Hayden as part of the extension to the Annette Kellerman Gym.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:                    Nil

 

C1018(1) Item 1  Mayoral Minute: Mullens Street Crossing Funding

Motion: (Byrne)

 

THAT:

 

1.   Council reallocate the combined $75,000 in funding for the Darling Street Rozelle, Kerb extensions at Manning Street; Beattie Street / Mullens Street intersection, Balmain – pedestrian fence; and Rozelle – Batty Street, at Mansfield Street – kerb extensions;

2.   Design work commence immediately to enable the delivery of the Mullens Street crossing near Beattie Street within the 2018-2019 Financial Year;

3.   Council re-allocate funds to the Kerb extensions at Manning Street; Beattie Street / Mullens Street intersection, Balmain – pedestrian fence; and Rozelle – Batty Street, at Mansfield Street – kerb extensions in the 2019-2020 Financial Year budget; and

4. Council notify affect residents of the outcome of councils decision and the expected forward progress on this.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:                    Nil

 

C1018(1) Item 13       Mayoral Minute: Financial Assistance For Local             Festivals and             Fairs

Motion: (Byrne)

 

THAT:

 

1.    Council note that the fee waiver adopted in Item 21 of the Ordinary Meeting of 25 September 2018 was invalid;

 

2.   Council provide a donation to the equivalent sum of any application fees required to authorise the temporary food stalls and road closures required for the operation of the Newtown Good Food Festival;

 

3.   Council be provided with a report outlining:

a)    The estimated revenue shortfall for waiving the fees for local Business Chambers and local business associations events for:

i. Temporary Food Permits; and

ii.            Temporary Road Occupancy.

 

b)    If the revenue losses can be absorbed within current operational budgets; and

 

c)    An estimate of current support provided to Business Chambers and local business associations to conduct the Norton Street Festa and the Newtown Food Fair and other similar events.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Lockie, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:                    Crs Kiat, Macri and Passas

 

Councillor Passas left the Meeting at 7:19 pm

 

C1018(1) Item 14       Mayoral Minute: Lilyfield Road Cycleway

Motion: (Byrne)

 

THAT Council:

 

1.    Write to the Minister for Transport requesting confirmation in writing of ongoing funding for the Lilyfield Road cycleway; and

 

2.   Be provided in with a report to the first Council meeting in November with an update on the outcomes of the initial public meetings, at which alternate proposals were initially presented to the community and a summary of expenditure to date on the project.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Cr Passas

 

Suspension of Standing Orders

 

Motion: (Hesse/Porteous)

 

THAT Council bring forward Item 5 to hear from the members of public who registered to speak and then this matter be dealt with at this time.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

Councillor Passas returned to the Meeting at 7:28 pm.

 

Councillors Iskandar and Macri left the Meeting at 7:28 pm as they had declared a significant, non-pecuniary conflict of interest in Item 4. They did not participate in discussion or vote on the item.

 

C1018(1) Item 5  Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel Report: DA201700185: 728 Princes Highway, Tempe

Motion: (Byrne/Passas)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council make a submission endorsing the officers recommendations, in particular addressing the key objections raised by Council Officers, including:

 

    1. On Street Car Parking

                              i.        Up to 16 spaces along the northern side of Smith Street may be lost as a result of the proposal;

                             ii.        Further car spaces may be lost on the southern side of Smith Street near the Princes Highway as a result of the proposed signal configuration; and

                           iii.        Insufficient information submitted with the application to adequately identify the quantity of, and address the impact of the resultant loss of car parking on Smith Street.

 

    1. Traffic

                              i.        Queuing in Smith Street and the failure to identify measures to ameliorate the impact from the development;

                             ii.        The potential increase in traffic using Union Street; and

                           iii.        Insufficient information submitted with the application to adequately assess the impact of the development on the local street network in relation to increased traffic.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Kiat, Lockie, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Crs Iskandar and Macri

 

Resumption of Standing Orders

 

Motion: (Byrne/Lockie)

 

THAT Standing Orders be resumed.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Kiat, Lockie, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Iskandar and Macri

 

Councillors Iskandar and Macri returned to the Meeting at 7:46 pm.

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

8.04pm - The Mayor, Clr Byrne adjourned the meeting for a short recess.

8.16pm– The Mayor, Clr Byrne resumed the meeting.

 

 

C1018(1) Item 2  Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy

Motion: (Drury/Passas)

 

THAT:

 

1.       The draft Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days;

 

2.       The 46 Clubs currently utilising sporting grounds in the Inner West be advised by email that the draft Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy is on public exhibition; and

 

3.       The results of the public exhibition and community engagement process are presented to Council along with a final Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy for adoption.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

 

Amendment (Da Cruz/Steer)

 

THAT:

1. The draft Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy be amended as follows:

a)         Participation Statistics (Club, Allocated Time & Grounds, Sport,
            Adult Men, Adult Women, Girls Under 16, Boys Under 16, Residents of the
            LGA, Non-Residents and people identifying as having a disability) to be
            collected and published on website;

b)         Hockey be included the list of Traditional Sports in the Sporting Grounds    Allocation Policy;

c)         Membership of Management Committee/Board and Regular Membership of
            Club to include Gender;

d)         Elaboration on how ground sharing could operate;

e)         Annual Review of long term License Agreements to include provision of
            membership and participation statistics;

f)          Capital Contributions are against planned works for the ground
            can be used to bring works forward;

g)         A Bond to be paid;

h)         Impact of using sporting ground as off-leash dog park;

i)          Carparking to refer to Members and Visitors;

j)          Clarification of what a "Registered Inner West Sporting Club" is
            under Coaching Clinics;

k)         Which Policies this policy will supersede; and

l)          Arlington Reserve Lights to also be turned off at 9.15pm

 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Hesse, Porteous and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas and Stamolis

 

Amendment (Kiat/Hesse)

 

THAT the public exhibition of the draft policy include for consideration the following alternate proposal for capital contributions: that clubs making capital contributions to be eligible for increased tenure must also make an equal contribution to Council to be used at Council’s discretion to improve a sportsground in most need of an upgrade or urgent maintenance. 

 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Hesse, Kiat, Porteous and Steer

Against Motion:                    Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar, Lockie, Macri, Passas and Stamolis

 

Matter Arising – Possible use of non-Council fields and facilities

 

Motion: (Stamolis/Drury)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council commence investigations about the possible use of non-council sports fields and facilities such as at schools; and

 

  1. A report to come back to Council in early 2019.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:                    Cr Macri

 

C1018(1) Item 3  Yeo Park and Gough Reserve Plan of Management

Motion: (Drury/Passas)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council adopt the Plan of Management as it relates to Gough Reserve;

 

  1. Council, as land manager of Yeo Park (D 500212) Reserve Trust, refers the Plan of Management as it relates to Yeo Park (Crown Reserve) to the Minister of Primary Industries, Land and Water for consideration for adoption;

 

  1. Council undertake independent cost analysis of the proposed park improvements, notably a future restoration of the historic Yeo Park Bandstand/Rotunda and report these costs back to Council for consideration in the ten year capital works plan; and

 

  1. To ensure continued community access and enjoyment of the park as a whole, Council negotiate a formal license agreement with the NSW Department of Education for community access to the Department of Education land within the park.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:                    Nil

 

C1018(1) Item 4  ParkSafe - Camperdown Memorial Rest Park and Fleming Street Reserve Newtown.

Motion: (Lockie/Steer)

 

THAT:

 

1.      Council undertake a community safety survey to assess community views on             park safety at Camperdown Memorial Rest Park and Fleming Street   Playground.  The public survey will assess the following:

 

·        Community perceptions on safety within the two park areas;

·       Community ideas on reclaim the park initiatives with regards to the types of    community events and means in which Council and external agencies can assist         in activating the park;

·       Community perceptions on the establishment of an alcohol free zone in the     southern part of Camperdown Memorial Rest Park;

·       Community perceptions of the impact of lighting improvements on safety in    Camperdown Memorial Rest Park, including the 2018/2019 summer trial of    lighting pathways only;

·       Community support for increased Council presence in the park out of normal             working hours as a way of activating the park, such as evening ranger patrols;          and

·       Community support for the establishment of a community garden (subject to future community ownership and management) at Fleming Street Playground     and the removal of the picnic shelter.

 

2.         Council’s engagement actively includes young people who currently use      Camperdown Memorial Rest Park, including working with local youth outreach       organisations where required;

 

3.         The results of the public consultation are reported back to Council no later than     December 2018, with the report to include an interim assessment of the impact of          the lighting trial;

 

4.      Council implement the short term lighting improvements outlined in the report,          for a trial period over the 2018/2019 summer in which only path lights within the          park will be activated; and

 

5.      Council identify options for funding future long term lighting improvements   along key pathways within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park.

 

6.

a.            That the community survey recognise that there is well-established   community support for a public toilet, and propose a location or locations     for community comment;



b.           That council receive a report on funding and location options for the             construction of the public toilet in 2018/19 or sooner; and



c.            That council receive a report on the existing after dark operations of the       City of Sydney to improve safety and deter anti-social behaviour, with    consideration of whether these operations could be extended to the park. 

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:                    Nil

 

 

C1018(1) Item 6  Mandatory Reporting of Fire Safety Reports Referred to Council from Fire and Rescue NSW

Motion: (Macri/Drury)

 

THAT:

 

1.       Council note the correspondence provided by Fire and Rescue NSW for development (Attachment 1) and 30 Terminus Street Petersham (Attachment 2);

 

2.       Council endorse the Councils Officers use of statutory powers (and discretion as appropriate) under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 to require upgrades to buildings to the satisfaction of Council's Fire Safety Team in order to:

 

a.       improve the provisions for fire safety at the premises;

b.      improve the provision of fire safety awareness;

c.       improve the adequacy of the premises to prevent fire;

d.      improve the adequacy of the premises to suppress fire or prevent the spread of fire, and

e.       Improve the safety of persons in the event of fire.

 

3.    A further update on the process of implementing the required upgrades to these properties be brought to Council within the next 6 months.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

 

Councillor Passas retired from the Meeting at 8:59 pm.

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

9.10pm - The Mayor, Clr Byrne adjourned the meeting for a short recess.

9.13pm– The Mayor, Clr Byrne resumed the meeting.

 

C1018(1) Item 7  Biannual Progress Review (Q3/4) against the Operational Plan 2017/18

Motion: (Drury/Stamolis)

 

THAT the report be received and noted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Cr Passas

 

Matter Arising - Dawn Fraser Pool Funding (Porteous)

THAT:

1.    Council in regards to the restoration works for the Dawn Fraser Baths notes that:

a)    urgent works are estimated to cost $6.7 million and there is a current shortfall of $2.2 million in funding for these works.

b)    Council ‘s current position (Byrne/Drury)  is to:

Consider options for funding the remaining $2.2 million shortfall once the outcome of current grant applications for the project is known, noting that there must be no delay to implementation of the aforementioned essential works

 

c)    In line with the above Council has applied for a $4.2 million Greater Sydney Sports Facility Grant

d)    Council has already seen fit to reduce investment funds by approximately 30 million in this financial year to deliver a significant capital works program.

 

2.    Council therefore allocates a further 2.2 million funds from the investment funds budget in this financial year to the Dawn Fraser Pool restoration works to provide assurance to the community that the works will proceed.

 

3.    These investment funds are to be used in event that council is not successful in its application for the Greater Sydney Sports Facility Grant.

 

They Mayor ruled the Matter Arising Out of Order as it did not relate to the business being discussed in Item 7 being the Quarter 3 and 4 progress against the 2017/18 Operational Plan and the Matter Arising did not identify a source of funds to undertake the work as required by Clause 5.1(1) of the Code of Meeting Practice.

 

C1018(1) Item 8  Former-Council Legacy Policies Rescission

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT the following legacy policies rescinded as they are deemed obsolete:

 

a)   Audio Recording of Council Meetings Policy;

 

b)   Council Committee Structure and Terms of Reference;

 

c)   Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy;

 

d)   Provision of Information to Councillors Policy;

 

e)   Councillor Policy For Payment Of Expenses & Provision Of Facilities;

 

f)    Meetings Between Councillors & Members Of Parliament and/or Government Departments;

 

g)   Precinct Committee System Policy;

 

h)   Precinct Committee System Policy;

 

i)    Social Media Policy;

 

j)    Media Relations Policy;

 

k)   Community Engagement Policy; and

 

l)    Social Media Strategy.

 

 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar, Lockie and Macri

Against Motion:          Crs Da Cruz, Hesse, Kiat, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Absent                         Cr Passas

 

Foreshadowed Motion (Porteous/Da Cruz)

 

THAT this item be deferred so that Councillors can be provided with a copy of the Policies proposed to be rescinded.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Hesse, Kiat, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar, Lockie and Macri

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

 

 

 

 

 

C1018(1) Item 9  2017/18 Annual Designated Person Disclosure (Pecuniary Interest)  Returns

Motion: (Macri/Hesse)

 

THAT Council note the tabling of Pecuniary Interest Returns of Designated Staff for the return period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Cr Passas

 

C1018(1) Item 10       Notice of Motion: Future of White Bay Cruise Ship Terminal Bus

Motion: (Stamolis/Byrne)

 

THAT Council prepares a report by November 2018 which:

·      Provides an update on the status and effectiveness of the minibus service to the White Bay Cruise Ship Terminal;

·      Details the costs to Council of the minibus service since it commenced; and

·     Widely consult with the Chamber and businesses in Balmain and Rozelle about      any future use of the funds used for the bus.   

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

C1018(1) Item 11       Notices of Motion: Late Motions to the Local Government NSW          Conference

Motion: (Porteous/Da Cruz)

 

THAT:

 

1.   Council consider for endorsement as a Late Motion to the  NSW Local Government Conference any motion brought to this IWC council meeting by Councillors; and

 

2.   Those motions which are endorsed by council for inclusion as Late Motions are then forwarded to NSW Local Government as Late Motions for the conference. 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Hesse, Kiat, Lockie, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar and Macri

Absent:                                  Cr Passas

 

 

 

 

 

Confidential Session

 

Motion: (Byrne/Stamolis)

 

THAT Council move into Confidential session to consider Items of business containing Confidential Information.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

Members of the public were asked to leave the Chamber.

 

Motion: (Byrne/Hesse)

 

THAT Council return to open session to read out the recommendations from the

Closed Session.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

The Mayor read out to the Meeting the recommendation from the Closed Session of

Council.

 

Reports with Confidential Information

 

C1018(1) Item 12       Contract for ICT Hardware

Motion: (Byrne/Hesse)

 

THAT:

 

1.   The tender submitted by the vendor recommended in the confidential section be accepted for RFQ50-18 Desktop Replacement for Inner West Council; and

 

2.   The General Manager be delegated the authority to sign and execute the contract.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urgency Motion

 

Councillor Porteous requested that the meeting consider an Urgency Motion with regards to a report on the use of Round Up in Council parks, sporting fields and playgrounds and near waterways.

 

Motion: (Porteous)

 

THAT the motion be considered as a matter of urgency.

 

The Mayor declared this matter was not urgent in accordance with Clause 2.7(3) of the Code of Meeting Practice.

 

Urgency Motion

 

Councillor Kiat requested that the meeting consider an Urgency Motion with regards to Advertising for the Everest Horse Racing Event on the Opera House.

 

Motion: (Kiat)

 

THAT the motion be considered as a matter of urgency.

 

The Mayor declared this matter was not urgent in accordance with Clause 2.7(3) of the Code of Meeting Practice.

 

 

Meeting closed at 9.26pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Speakers:

 

 

Item #

 

Speaker                     

Suburb

Item 5:

Katrina Widauer

Tempe

 

Dr Angus Hughson

Tempe

tem No:          C1018(2) Item 1

Subject:         Financial Statements 2017/18           

Prepared By:     Pav Kuzmanovski - Group Manager Finance  

Authorised By:  Michael Tzimoulas - Deputy General Manager Chief Financial and Administration Officer

 

SUMMARY

To adopt the Financial Statements for 2017/18.

 

 

A report with details on the adoption of the Financial Statements for 2017/18 will be circulated prior to the Meeting.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 2

Subject:         Draft Dawn Fraser Baths Master Plan: Feedback from Public Exhibition           

Prepared By:     Vanessa Phillips - Landscape Architect  

Authorised By:  Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

 

SUMMARY

The Draft Dawn Fraser Baths Master Plan was on public exhibition from 31 August 2018 to 28 September 2018.  The plans received more than 93% approval from the community.  Minor changes were requested during the exhibition period and these have been included in the revised plan to better meet community needs. This report provides an overview of the revised plan, the design process and the feedback received from the community.  This report is seeking Council’s endorsement of the master plan so the plans can inform improvements at the Dawn Fraser Baths.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.       Council adopts the draft Dawn Fraser Baths Master Plan (ATTACHMENT 1);

 

2.       All residents and stakeholders who made submissions during the public exhibition period be notified of Council’s determination; and

 

3.       The master plan informs future capital upgrades at the Dawn Fraser Baths.

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

The Public Domain Planning team has engaged across Council, with the community, businesses and State Government Agencies to develop an integrated public domain master plan for the Dawn Fraser Baths.

 

The draft plan was endorsed for public exhibition at the 28 August 2018 Council meeting.  The minutes relating to the master plan from the meeting note that:

 

1.   The draft Dawn Fraser Baths Master Plan be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days;

 

2.   The results of the public exhibition and community engagement process are presented to Council recommending further action;

 

The plan was on exhibition for 28 days, during which the plans obtained much support with over 93% from the community in favor of the plan. Comments received have informed a revision of the plan to ensure it better reflects the community’s vision for the Dawn Fraser Baths.

 

Project Scope

 

The scope of the master plan includes:

 

·    The Dawn Fraser Baths including the buildings and pool surrounds

·    Access pathways to the Baths from nearby streets and through Elkington Park

·    A review of Elkington Park’s public toilet location and design

·    Park elements raised by the community during community engagement

·    Review of available car parking

·    Review of existing vegetation and slope stabilization options

·    Improvement of stormwater quality for water entering the harbour

·    Public domain elements that impact the design and construction of these listed elements.

 

The aim of the master plan has been to develop a ten year plan of improvements at the Baths for users and staff, while maintaining the existing character and sense of place.  The master plan provides an illustrative representation of the proposed improvements and includes text, images, plans and diagrams that are easily understood by a variety of audiences.  The master plan is fully costed to understand budget requirements and integrated with Council’s forward financial and asset plans.

 

Master Plan Process

 

Public Domain Planning has used its internal design team to develop the public domain master plan.  Staff worked collaboratively with Council stakeholders and the community to develop a master plan for the Baths.  Detailed site analysis reviewed site history, zoning, stormwater and drainage design, active transport connections, pathway and access networks, existing trees, existing parking, indigenous vegetation types, biodiversity and revegetation strategies, park furniture. The combination of site analysis and stakeholder input produced opportunities and constraints that were used to establish the master plan design strategies.  The strategies were costed to understand financial implications of proposed upgrades and the integrated into Council forward capital budget.

 

Master Plan Proposals

 

The draft master plan proposes strategies aim to improve the user experience at the Baths and in Elkington Park, while maintaining the existing character and sense of place.  Some of the master plan strategies include:

 

·    Renovate the male and female showers, toilets and change rooms

·    Provide unisex family change rooms

·    Provide at an equal access toilet, shower and change room

·    Provide additional seating options with moveable tables, chairs and sun lounges around the pool deck

·    Install pool-side shade umbrellas

·    Upgrade the existing lighting at the Baths to meet water polo match play requirements

·    Install a curated memorabilia display area

·    Improve the entry configuration and access from the harbour foreshore

·    Renovate the foreshore car park to improve equal access car parking and drop off area and provide an accessible route from the car park to the Baths entry

·    Improve the vehicle access driveway from Fitzroy Avenue

·    Raise the Baths floor level to mitigate climate change and sea level rise

·    Raise the beach area so entry is flush with the pool deck  and install children’s seating terraces at the beach edges

·    Undertake weed removal and bank stabilisation with new locally native tree, shrub and groundcover plantings on the escarpment immediately behind the Baths

·    Improve the playground within Elkington Park and include nature play and planting

·    Renovate the public toilet facility within Elkington Park

·    Include Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) options to improve quality of stormwater entering the harbour

 

 


 

Update on Dawn Fraser Baths ‘Essential Works’

 

The essential works scope includes: Design for sea level rise and raising the boardwalk, South Pavilion and Central Pavilion by approximately 1 metre; Demolition and reconstruction of the South Pavilion and Central Pavilion and re-using as much original fabric/ timber; New compliant bathroom and change rooms on ground floor; Upgrade electrical switchboard; BCA compliance; Sprinkler system to entire baths; Storm water upgrade; Improve accessibility; Refurbishment of piers; and Waterpolo lighting.

 

This is an update further to the 28th August 2018 report to Council. A Development Application for the essential works at Dawn Fraser Bath was lodged on 27 August 2018 with an extended notification period closing on 24 October 2018 due to the school holidays. It is estimated that the DA will be determined at the end of November, however this relies on an approval from the Office of Heritage and Environment (OEH).

 

The current project cost estimate is $6.7 million, however the identified risks that may increase project costs are:

 

-       Office of Heritage and Environment (OEH) conditions of approval/ refusal with the proposed works;

-       Complexity of site access and location of the works on and near the water;

-       Tender pricing due to specialised works (piers/ heritage fabric) and limitation of qualified firms to carry out the works;

-       Unforeseen conditions during the works;

-       Design development identifying uncosted issues;

 

Detailed design has progressed to 50% with a complete design anticipated by the end of November. At this stage, there have been no further major issues identified with the design development impacting on the project cost. The project estimate including cost escalation and contingencies will be updated through the design process with a further cost check at 75%, 90% and pre-tender estimate.

 

An expression of interest procurement process requesting submissions from suitably qualified contractors will commence with a select tender process to follow once the DA is approved and the design is finalised.

 

Monitoring of the structural integrity and flood inundation continues for public safety.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Masterplan

The master plan costs have been estimated to total $9,857,900.00.  The master plan costs have been grouped under six headings relating to the area and type of improvements proposed.  The cost breakdown associated with each grouping is listed below:

 

Stage

Amount

Essential works

$6,700,000

Poolside furniture and other master plan strategies

$1,117,058

Park and pathway access improvements

$2,040,842

 

 

Total

$9,857,900

 

‘Essential Works Project’

A grant application for $4.2 million to the Greater Sydney Sports Facility Grant was submitted. The outcome of the grants process will be available in February 2019.

 

In accordance with the previous resolution of Council, $2.1 million was transferred to the Essential works project from the Leichhardt Section 94 funds previously allocated to an indoor sports centre.

 

The funding gap is currently $2.2 million.

 

Options for funding were provided in the 28th August 2018 council report. In summary these include;

 

1.    Grant: An application for the Greater Sydney Sports Facility Grant program for $4.2million was submitted pending advice.

2.    Loan: A loan for the Ashfield Aquatic Centre is required and it can be extended to cover the shortfall for Dawn Fraser. This is not recommended without also undertaking a review of other council projects in both capital and operating budget to ensure that the Current Ratio does not go below the benchmark of 1.5.

3.   Repriotitise the budget: Review the entire capital works program to identify if there are funding sources or projects that can be reprioritised. This has commenced and will continue through the budget process.

4.   Allocate Surplus Funds: Surplus from end of financial year

 

Further to point No.3 above, a review of the long-term Capital Works program has identified that options exists to:

 

5.   Redistribute Aquatics Centre Renewal funding from outer years of the LTFP (years 5+) and allocate to Dawn Fraser Baths in the relevant year.  This option ensures that we are using Aquatics renewal funds and maintains the renewal ratio for aquatics assets.  It will result in other (as yet unidentified) aquatic centre renewal projects not being funded;

 

6.   Redistribute Leichhardt s94 Open Space funds from outer years of the budget to fund Dawn Fraser.  Unallocated VPA monies could be used to fund the projects that are identified that may have received Open Space funding in those years.

 

STAFF COMMENTS

The development of the master plan required collaboration with all disciplines across Council.  Staff input occurred multiple times and included a variety of forums including one on one meetings, design workshops, email correspondence, telephone discussions and a final review of the draft master plan.  The collaborative process has resulted in the development of multifunctional outcomes that benefit multiple users.  The internal stakeholders across Council included representatives from:

 

·    Development Assessment and Regulatory Services

·    Trees, Parks and Sport fields

·    Environment and Sustainability

·    Roads, Traffic and Stormwater

·    Properties, Major Building Projects and Facilities

·    Finance

·    Strategic Planning

·    Library and History Services

·    Recreation and Aquatics

·    Community Services and Culture

·    Communications, Engagement and Events

 


 

PREVIOUS COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

During October and November 2017 Inner West Council undertook community engagement to understand the current use and future vision from the community for the Dawn Fraser Baths. The community engagement included interactive engagement sessions and an online survey at the Inner West Council ‘Your Say Inner West’ website. During the six week engagement period, the online website received 1965 visits with 215 surveys completed. The engagement sessions also received input from over 125 respondents who completed interactive activities, paper surveys, had lengthy discussions with Council staff and submitted letters to Council.

 

The scope of the engagement included feedback on:

 

·    The Dawn Fraser Baths;

·    The caretaker’s cottage;

·    Access pathways to the Baths and the Caretaker’s Cottage through Elkington Park;

·    The Elkington Park public toilets;

·    Car parking areas, embankment, stabilization and storm water design solutions to ameliorate the degradation of the southern pavilion; and

·    Public domain elements that impact the design and construction of these listed elements.

·    Information on how attendees use the space and from where attendees travel from.

 

The feedback highlighted the majority of those that visit the Dawn Fraser Baths live on the Balmain peninsula, although 16% of visitors do travel from a wide range of suburbs including Surry Hills, Caringbah and Vauclause.

 

From the feedback, a clear list of actions has been requested by the community which has been considered in the master plan. The Community Engagement Report is included as ATTACHMENT 2.  Some of the feedback includes:

 

·    Retain the existing unique heritage and character of the Baths and Elkington Park;

·    Complete upgrades at the Baths once and do the works properly;

·    Retain the existing native vegetation on the slope between the Baths and Elkington Park - although remove the weed trees and Lantana;

·    Improve access pathways to the Baths and into the water at the Baths;

·    Renovate or improve the toilets and change rooms.  Provide family change rooms at the Baths;

·    Provide more shade options including over the beach area;

·    Provide more / different seating options;

·    Display the heritage memorabilia relating to the Baths;

 

Additional engagement was completed with stakeholders including the Balmain Swimming Club and Water Polo Club.  The feedback included a written submission that along with the other feedback from the community has been used as a layer of analysis (e.g. proposed flood levels or building structural condition) and design direction to progress the designs for both the essential works package and master plan.

 

 

PUBLIC EXHIBITION

During the 28 day public exhibition period from Friday 31 August 2018 to 28 September 2018, advertising material directed the community to review the master plan and complete a short survey at the ‘Your Say Inner West’ website.  Advertising material included Facebook posts, advertising in the Inner West Courier newspaper, Tweets on Twitter and cover sheets (on copies of the master plan) in each of the Customer Service Centres.

 

During the exhibition period the online documents received 663 visits and 96 submissions. From the 96 submissions Council received over 93% support for the plans. Some respondents provided comments and feedback.   The feedback has been used to amend the plans so they better align with community sentiments.   

 

A summary of key themes from the community include:

·    Maintaining access to the baths throughout construction works

·    Improved access into the baths from the pontoon

·    Request for additional detailed business case to be undertaken

·    Detailed geomorphic investigation undertaken prior to the import of additional sand

·    Intensification of water polo usage was not supported

 

Most comments were positive and others reiterated processes that had already been completed in the development of the plans.  The feedback was used to review and amend the draft master plan design strategies.  The full list of submissions with Council’s comments and listed requested amendments are included as ATTACHMENT 3.

 

CONCLUSION

The draft Dawn Fraser Baths Master Plan has been developed through a collaborative process to establish the values consistent with the views of the local community and stakeholders. This has been demonstrated through the high levels of support during the public exhibition process.  The high level of community support and the amendments to the plans post exhibition to address community feedback has established a detailed 10 year plan that is consistent with the community vision and values.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Dawn Fraser Baths Master Plan Report

2.

Community Engagement Report

3.

Improving Dawn Fraser Baths - Community Engagement Response

  


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 3

Subject:         A Healthier Inner West - Office of Sport           

Prepared By:     Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields 

Authorised By:  Elizabeth Richardson - Deputy General Manager Assets and Environment

 

SUMMARY

This report proposes the creation of an Office of Sport to assist and partner local sporting clubs and organisations to strategically address community health and wellbeing in the Inner West.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.       Council appoint an Office of Sport Coordinator to assist and partner local sporting clubs and organisations to strategically address community health and wellbeing and actively promote this service;

 

2.       That the position be be temporarily appointed for a trial period of two years initially.  The effectiveness and success of the Office of Sport shall be evaluated at the end of the two year period.

 

3.       The Office of Sport Coordinator strategically partner with the sporting clubs and key partners to increase participation of girls, women, people from lower socio economic backgrounds and people with disabilities as informed by the Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West.

 

 

BACKGROUND

At the Extraordinary Council Meeting on the 31 October 2017 it was resolved (in part):

 

THAT for the February 2018 meeting the General Manager provide reports on how Council can:

 

1.         Establish an Inner West Office of Sport to provide assistance to clubs and transform the Council’s relationship with sporting clubs from one based on ground hire only into a strategic partnership to improve the health and wellbeing of our community;

 

2.         Work with clubs to identify bold targets for increasing the participation of women and girls across all sports and implement ways of increasing participation from people from lower socio-economic backgrounds;

 

A report was presented to the 27 March 2018 Council meeting where it was resolved (in part):

 

Council defer the appointment an Office of Sport Coordinator until after the completion of the Recreation Needs Study;

 

The Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West is on the agenda for consideration at the Council meeting on the 30 October 2018.  This report on the Office of Sport is therefore presented concurrently.

The Council resolution identifies the need for Council to lead the development of a Healthier Inner West by providing the following:

 

·    Advance the health of our residents by increasing their opportunities to engage in community sport and recreation to combat the threat of increasing incidence of lifestyle related diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. 

 

·    Promote and encourage a healthy lifestyle for school age children specifically and the community generally through sports participation.   Work with local community sporting bodies to increase participation levels in sport for people from lower socio-economic backgrounds to remove economic or social barriers.

 

·    Transform the Council’s relationship with sporting clubs from one based on ground hire only into a strategic partnership to improve the health and wellbeing of our community.  Work with local clubs to set ambitious targets for increasing the participation of women and girls in sport.

 

·    Drive participation in community sport, which helps to build our community, community cohesion and social wellbeing. Encourage community sports clubs, which are the largest network of volunteers in our community, and ensure they get the recognition, support and investment they need.

 

It is proposed to create the position of Office of Sport Coordinator to work strategically with sporting clubs to achieve these operational and strategic objectives.  The Office of Sport Coordinator will liaise with local sporting clubs and relevant Council officers, regarding:

 

·    Using Parks and Sportsgrounds

Seasonal Hire

Casual Hire

Commercial Fitness Training

Lighting

Sportsfield maintenance

Building maintenance

 

·    Assistance for Clubs

Council grants

Assistance applying for grants

Club development including volunteer support, capacity building

 

·    Sports Forum

 

·    Policy and Planning

Recreation Needs

 

·    Other resources

ClubSpot

RecPost

      

·    A liaison point to Parks Planning & Engagement – sportsfields allocations (seasonal and casual bookings), sportsfield lighting, parks planning and master planning, capital works within parks, assistance with the preparation of grant applications to external bodies.

 

·    A liaison point to Recreation - strategic recreation matters including increasing participation in sports and the need for new facilities, and awareness of and assistance with grant funding opportunities.

 

·    A liaison point to Properties, Major Building Projects & Facilities – maintenance matters for buildings within parks, cleaning of buildings/ facilities within parks, and leasing and licencing of parks/ sportsfields (greater than one season).

 

In order to promote the newly appointed Office of Sport Coordinator, it is proposed that the Coordinator develop and implement a community engagement strategy, which will allow the Office of Sport to reconnect and build stronger relationships with the clubs, including:

 

·    Dedicated section on Inner West Council website;

·    Mail out to all local sporting and recreation organisations promoting the service in detail;

·    Follow-up meetings with clubs;

·    Updates through the Inner West Sports Forum, which meets at least twice per year; and

·    Dedicated online resource providing email support, training for volunteers and template documents (checklists, letters etc.)

 

It is proposed that the Office of Sport Coordinator be temporarily appointed for a trial period of two years initially.  The effectiveness and success of the Office of Sport will be evaluated at the end of the two year period to determine whether to continue the service.

 

Targets to Increase Participation

 

Based on the recommendations from the Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West, the Office of Sport Coordinator would work strategically with local sports clubs and other key partners to actively increase the participation of girls, women, people from lower socio economic backgrounds and people with disabilities.

 

The Office of Sport Coordinator will also develop a calendar of grant funding opportunities and promote awareness of this to sporting clubs and assist them with the development of applications for projects consistent with Council’s strategic objectives.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The position of Office of Sport Coordinator will cost approximately $120,000 including on-costs per annum. Funding for this position has been identified in the 2018/2019 budget.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Parks Planning & Engagement, Recreation and Finance staff were consulted in the development of this report.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Extensive public consultation was undertaken as part of the Recreation Needs Study.

 

CONCLUSION

It is recommended that an Office of Sport be created to assist and partner local sporting clubs and organisations to strategically address community health and wellbeing in the Inner West.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 4

Subject:         Alternative Sites for a Regional Skate Park Facility in the North of the Inner West LGA           

Prepared By:     Aaron Callaghan - Parks Planning and Engagement Manager 

Authorised By:  Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

 

SUMMARY

This report outlines the history of investigation into a regional skate park in Callan Park.  The report identifies opportunities for the skate park within the north of the Inner West local government area.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.   Council seek an urgent meeting with the Minister of Health and the Minister for Environment and Heritage to discuss in principal approvals for the development of a regional skate park on the footprint of Hastings House (B505) adjacent to the Iron Cove Bay Run at Callan Park;

 

2.   Council include in this proposal the demolition of Hastings House (B505) and Palm Court (B514) which will facilitate the opening up of the Waterfront precinct in this area of Callan Park; and

 

3.   Should the Hasting House Site (B505) not be supported by Government in writing by December 2018, that Council investigate an alternative location and proceed to undertake community engagement on the development of a skate park facility adjacent to Leichhardt #3.

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

Since 2011, Council has tried unsuccessfully to design and deliver a regional skate park facility at Callan Park. There is significant community support for the project, which included engagement with local youth in the design process.  To date, the NSW Government has not provided owner’s consent to allow Council to proceed with the lodgment of a Development Application on a revised location for a regional skate within Callan Park. The background and time lines involved in the development of a regional skate park are provided in Table 1.0 below:

 

Table 1.0 Chorological Timeline of Events-Callan Park Regional Skate Park Development

 

August 2011

Council writes to the Premier of NSW seeking care and control of site for Skate Park in Callan Park

November 2011

Council submits Callan Park Master Plan after community consultation, including provision for Skate Park

June 2013

Council approves $50,000 funding for the design and approval of skate park, intention to build in 2014/15

Dec 2014

Council completes design plans for Skate Park near Balmain Road sporting ground

Exhibited until late Feb 2015 and reported to Council.

February 2015

Council begins the process of a DA approval for the site.

June 2015

Council approves $907,000 for construction of the skate park

July 2015

Council meets with Minister Speakman and requests help to progress the Skate Park

December 2015

Council given approval to  lodge Development Application

March 2016

Heritage Council does not support the Development Application

9th November 2016.

Meeting held with Minister Speakman’s Chief of Staff and OEH Advisors on rational for Heritage Council determination.  Delegation of Council staff and Council’s Administrator attend meeting.

Council advised to explore options for an alternative location within Callan Park.

January 2017

New site identified near the NSW Ambulance base in the park. Informal approval provided from OEH staff, but contingent on the completion of their landscape structure plans.

February  2017

Council develops new design plans for Skate Park in highly modified area of the park (Adjacent to the NSW Ambulance Centre).

2nd August 2017

Council presents skate park plans on site at Callan Park to the NSW Heritage Council at their August 2016 meeting.

24th August 2017

Council receives minutes from the NSW Heritage Council meeting confirming in-principal support for the regional skate park and the new location.

5th December 2017

Council receives verbal confirmation that OEH will not support the new site, nor will it provide owner’s consent.

31st January 2018

OEH outline an alternate site within Callan Park at the rear of the Waterfront Drive sporting ground. Council officers highlight significant concerns regarding lack of passive surveillance and proximity to public transport.  Council officers request from OEH formal correspondence on alternative sites. None received.  

28th August 2018

Mayoral correspondence sent to Minister Upton (Minister of Environment, Minister for Heritage) seeking an urgent meeting to progress the regional skate park adjacent to the NSW Ambulance Centre and requesting a written response from Government on the adoption of the Callan Park Master Plan and the formation of the Trust model. Clarification on the purpose and the scope of the Landscape Structure Plan was also sought.  

 

 

An earlier report on skate park options was considered at the Council meeting on the 12 June 2018.  A copy of this report is attached.  Council resolved (in part):

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Seek an urgent meeting with the NSW Minister for the Environment to advocate for support from the State Government for the development of a Regional skate park in Callan Park, adjacent to the NSW Ambulance Centre. At this meeting if agreed to,  in addition, at this meeting Council requests:

a)   The Government’s written response to adoption and implementation of the 2011  Callan Park Masterplan and the establishment of the Callan Park and Broughton Hall Trust;

b)   Clarification on the purpose and scope of the Landscape Structure Plan (LSP) for Callan Park;

c)   In relation to the Landscape Structure Plan (LSP) that council and the community be provided with:

·    An outline of all further community consultation planned and how that will be promoted widely across the community;

·    A process outlined on how written submissions will be received and assessed by the consultants;

·    A formal closing date for receipt for submissions to the Landscape Structure Plan; and

·    A commitment to put any preferred landscape plan on exhibition to allow for further consultation with the community.

 

In recent weeks OEH staff have verbally advised that are prepared to consider a compromise site within Callan Park, subject to support from their Landscape Structure consultants and subject to future approvals. The new and alternative site within Callan Park is located in the waterfront precinct and is considered in Table 1.1.

 

Council staff have requested that in principle support for this location is provided in writing.  At the time of preparing this report, this written advice has not been provided.  This advice will be tabled at the Council meeting should it be received in the meantime.

 

REPORT

 

Four potential alternative sites have been identified by Council officers as future locations for a regional skate park facility in the North of Inner West Council Local Government area. These are highlighted in Table 1.1 below:

 

Table 1.1 Alternative Sites for a Regional Skate Park in the North of the LGA

 

Location

Opportunities

Risks

King George Park Northern Section of adjacent to the Iron Cove Bridge

Highly visible site with excellent passive surveillance.

 

Site is under utilised in terms of open space use.

 

Located next to major transport routes and the Iron Cove Bay run.

 

Likely to be opposition from local residents

Leichardt Park -Site adjacent to Leichhardt 3 Sporting Ground

Highly visible site with excellent passive surveillance.

 

Site is under utilised in terms of passive recreation.

 

Site is located next to the La Montage Function Centre, Café, the junior sporting ground and the Iron Cove Bay Run.

 

Site has the ability to be floodlit.

 

Residential impacts will be minor.

 

At least 20 Casurina trees and 2 Gum trees would be required to be removed however this could be balanced with improved landscaping as part of the overall project.

 

Plan of Management for Leichhardt Park would need to be amended to provide for the skate park proposal. Permission from the Office of Crown Lands would be required (land is Crown Reserve).

 

The size of the skate park would be half the size of the new Sydenham Green Skate Park (therefore not fully regional).

Rozelle Goods Yards

 

Site near the Lilyfield Light Rail Station

Site is currently utilised by RMS as part of the WestConnex M4-M5 Link Rozelle Interchange project. Government announced in July 2016 a new park will be developed on this site.

 

Site has previously been advocated by Council and community groups as a site for a regional skate park.

 

NSW Government has identified and supported this site for a skate park facility along with open space provision as part of its visioning for the future of the Rozelle Good Yards site, once the WestConnex project is completed.

 

Site is not owned by Council .

 

Any development is at least five to ten years away.

 

High risk that Government vision for this area may not proceed.

Callan Park-Hasting House (B505) Site

Site is located on the footprint of Hastings House (B505)

 

Site has high passive surveillance from the Iron Cove Bay Run and the current design of the regional skate park could be modified to support this location .

 

Site is located in front of the Refugee Welcome Centre.  Youth activities could be supported from this building further activating the space in the longer term.

 

With associated landscaping, the proposed skate park would enhance the waterfront precinct and attract a greater diversity of users to the park.

 

As per the previous proposal at the NSW Ambulance site, Council could consider as part of the project demolishing two buildings on the waterfront (Hastings House and Palm Court) to support and create a more harmonised open space setting which supports the concept of an urban parkland. Note: The previous proposal included demolishing three houses adjacent to the Balmain Road Sporting Ground. 

 

Significantly, both buildings have been identified as intrusive to the park setting in adopted Conservation Management Plans and removal is supported.

Site is not owned by Council. Support would be required from OEH for the proposal to proceed and a DA would need to be lodged and heritage approvals received.

 

May be opposition from some residents and community groups.

 

 

Site Photos and Diagrams

 

King George Park                                                      

 

 

 

Leichhardt Park

 

Rozelle Goods Yards

 

 Artists Impression of the Proposed New Inner West Park and Skate Park Facility Rozelle Rail Yards

 

 

 

Callan Park Site-Hastings House (B505)

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Council has allocated a budget of $1,275,000 for the regional skate park facility in the north of the LGA.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

The development of a regional skate park in the north of the LGA has been highlighted in the Draft Recreation and Needs Study “A Healthier Inner West” and as a priority in the Callan Park area. 

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Future Community Engagement will be required on any of the new sites which have been identified. Key stakeholder engagement with Government is required to move this project forward on the Callan Park site.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Callan Park remains the preferred location for a skate park in the northern part of the Inner West LGA.

 

Council has previously received in principal support from the NSW Heritage Council for the development of a regional skate park at Callan Park. The Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) who manage the park on behalf of Government have raised concerns in relation to the revised location of the skate park near the NSW Ambulance Centre and have notified Council that they won’t support this site.

 

OEH staff have however indicated informally that they may consider a proposal in the Waterfront precinct in an area where intrusive buildings have been identified to be removed. Council officers are awaiting a formal response from OEH on this matter.

 

It is recommended that Council seek an urgent meeting with the respective Ministers in this regard. It is noted that this site has significant potential and could result in positive outcomes for Council, the community and Government. 

 

Given the substantial delay in delivery of this project, should the preferred site at Callan Park not be forthcoming in the short term, it is recommended that Council move to the second preferred option.  Therefore, should Council not receive written commitment from the state government to support the regional skate park at the Hastings House site by the end of December 2018, it is recommended that Council proceed to investigate the site adjacent to Leichhardt #3.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Former Council Report 12 June 2018

  


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C0618 Item 1

Subject:         Callan Park Regional Skate Park Project           

Prepared By:     Aaron Callaghan - Parks Planning and Engagement Manager  

Authorised By:  Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

 


SUMMARY

This report highlights recent verbal advice received from the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) on the proposed regional skate park at Callan Park. OEH have recently advised that the skate park proposal will not be supported by OEH in the revised location which Council has suggested. 

 

OEH is currently developing a Landscape Structure Plan for Callan Park and has advised that specialist landscape architectural advice will be recommending that the skate park be located behind the Waterfront sporting ground. This site has poor visual surveillance and as such Council officers do not support this concept. The site being recommended by OEH’s principal architects appears to negate any prospect of a youth facility of this nature being developed in Callan park into the future.

 

The report also provides Council with a summary of other sites in the northern section of the LGA which have been assessed by Council officers as alternative locations for a skate park facility and the significant issues associated with any future planning and community engagements on these sites.

 


 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.       Seek an urgent meeting with the NSW Minister for the Environment to advocate for support from the State Government for the development of a Regional skate park in Callan Park, adjacent to the NSW Ambulance Centre.

 

2.       Note the significant planning issues associated with developing a skate park at alternative park locations.

 

 


 

 

BACKGROUND

 

On 19 July 2011, after 18 months of community consultation, the former Leichhardt Council adopted the draft Callan Park Master Plan, along with the Conservation

Management Plan and Plan of Management for Callan Park.

 

Callan Park is owned by NSW Health and is under the stewardship of the Office of Environment and Heritage.

 

One of the key community projects in the draft Callan Park Master Plan is the development of a regional skate park. During the master planning work statistical community support for a skate park within Callan Park was well received, with 70% online responses in favor of such a development.

 

Specific recommendations to facilitate a skate park included:

 

·    Removal of intrusive buildings to create the skate park site

·    Regional skate park with minimal structure to be constructed above the existing ground level to reduce visual impact.

 

Regional Skate Park Planning Timeline

November 2011: Council submits draft Callan Park Master Plan, including a provision for a skate park, to the State Government.

December 2011-2018: The State Government has provided no formal response to the draft Callan Park Master Plan.
December 2014: Council completes design plans for Callan Park skate park (first location).
December 2015: Council given land owner’s consent from the State Government to lodge Development Application for the skate park (first location).
March 2016: Heritage Council refuses to support the Development Application for the skate park (first location). Development Application is withdrawn by Council.
January 2017: New site for the skate park (second location) identified in Callan Park, near Balmain Road, adjacent to the NSW Ambulance car park. Concept plans revised to fit new location.  Informal in principal support from OEH staff and the NSW Heritage Council.
December 2017: Council receives confirmation that OEH will not support the new site for the skate park.

February 2018: OEH informs Council it will not support a skate park on the revised Balmain Road site and that a location for this type of facility may be considered as part of the Landscape Structure Planning programme of works.  

 

Revised Site Location Proposed Regional skate park Facility Callan Park

 

The revised location which OEH is considering as part of its Landscape Structure Plan is the demolition of B496 Foundation House (into the future) and the possible location of a skate park in this area. This site has poor visual surveillance, which may allow anti-social behaviour to occur and as such Council officers do not support this concept. In addition any such development could be many years away.

 

 

 

Review of Other Potential Sites

As part of a desktop review Council officers have reviewed a number of park areas in the north of the local government area which could potentially support a regional skate park. Table 1.0 below highlights these sites and outlines planning issues which Council would need to resolve should it wish to pursue an alternative site to Callan Park. Photos of each of the sites listed as part of the desktop review can be viewed in Attachment 1.

 

Table 1.0 Alternative Park Sites.

 

Park

Area Reference

Existing

POM

Positive Attributes

Areas for Concern

Recommended for Further Review

Shields PlaygroundDarley Road

Large Area of Passive Open Space adjacent to Darley Road light rail station

No

Located adjacent to the Hawthorne  light rail station.

Likely to be community opposition - as was the case when the netball courts were proposed at this site.

No

King George Park

High ground in  the northern section of the park (adjacent to Victoria Road) 

No

Located adjacent to Victoria Road bus services.

Good passive surveillance.

Site is very close to residential properties and there is likely to be community concerns associated with noise.

No

Hawthorne Canal Reserve

Southern section of the park which is a dedicated dog on-leash area.

No

(Being considered as part of the Greenway Master Plan)

Located adjacent to the Hawthorne  light rail station.

One tree would need to be removed.

The majority of the facility would need to be above ground due to the low water table in this area. 

Likely to be opposition from dog walkers.

No

Bridgewater Park

Large area of flat open space currently used for passive recreation and a dog off-leash park

Yes

Located adjacent to Victoria Road bus services.

Good passive surveillance.

Large area of flat open space

Site is very close to residential properties and there is likely to be community concerns associated with noise and perceived loss of greenspace.

The park is currently zoned off-leash.

No

Peace Grove (Leichhardt Park)

Linear section of passive open space adjacent to Le Montage in Leichhardt Park.

Yes

Good passive surveillance.

Site is very close to residential properties and there is likely to be community concerns associated with noise.

No

Leichhardt Park

Area between LPAC and Leichhardt Oval #2

Yes

Good passive surveillance.

No residents are immediately adjacent.

The space available is too constrained for a skate park.

No

 

While it is may be possible for Council to construct the regional skate park at the sites listed in Table 1.0, each location presents areas of concern.  From previous experience, opposition has often stemmed from perceived changes in use and a lack of acknowledgement of the wider community benefits that such facilities support. 

 

Council has received representations from a resident suggesting the construction of micro skate parks in the Inner West.  Similarly, to larger facilities, it is anticipated that smaller skate parks would receive considerable community concerns primarily associated with noise.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

Council has allocated a budget of $1,275,000 for the regional skate park facility in Callan Park.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

 

Nil

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

 

No consultation has been carried out on the alternative site being considered by OEH, to date.

Should Council consider any of the alternative sites viable then there would need to be  detailed and robust community engagement undertaken to assess community support for an alternative location.

 

CONCLUSION

 

This report highlights recent verbal advice received from the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) on the proposed regional skate park at Callan Park. OEH have recently advised that the skate park proposal will not be supported by OEH in the revised location which Council has suggested. 

 

OEH is currently developing a Landscape Structure Plan for Callan Park and has advised that specialist landscape architectural advice will be recommending that the skate park be located behind the Waterfront sporting ground. This site has poor visual surveillance and as such Council officers do not support this concept. The site being recommended by OEH’s principal architects appears to negate any prospect of a youth facility of this nature being developed in Callan park into the future.

 

The report also provides Council with a summary of other sites in the northern section of the LGA which have been assessed by Council officers as alternative locations for a skate park facility and the significant issues associated with any future planning and community engagements on these sites.

 

 


 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Attachment 1 -Alternative Site Locations

 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 5

Subject:         Outcomes from the public exhibition of the Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West.           

Prepared By:     Peter Montague - Recreation Planning and Programs Manager 

Authorised By:  John Warburton - Deputy General Manager Community and Engagement

 

SUMMARY

Further to the public exhibition of the draft Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West, this report details the outcomes and analysis from the exhibition process, the resulting changes and presentation of the amended final report to be considered for Council’s endorsement.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.       Council endorse the Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West report;

 

2.       The Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West report is used to inform the development of a Recreation Strategy, Section 7.11 Contributions Plan and other relevant Council planning documents; and

 

3.       All residents and stakeholders who expressed an interest are notified of Council’s decision and thanked for their contribution.

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

The merger of three local government areas to form the Inner West Council over the past two and half years highlighted the need for Council to undertake a study on recreation needs to inform a strategic position for the provision of recreation facilities, services and programs, that includes planning priorities, new Section 7.11 (formerly Section 94) Contributions Plan, recreation programs and services, and asset management for the equitable and relevant allocation of recreation resources to meet the present and future requirements of the local community.

 

Cred Consulting were engaged to research a range of specific factors relating to local recreation including:

 

·     Strategic document review and development of Engagement Plan;

·     Implementation of the engagement with community and stakeholders and presentation of the findings in a Community Engagement Report.

·     Quantitative research including condition audits of current recreation and sporting facilities, recreation activity undertaken in the LGA including the streets and streetscape as a recreation resource.

·     The development of an informed view of the future recreation and open space needs in the Inner West Council.

·     The findings from the analysis of current and future needs including identifying areas of unmet need and the implications for recreation facilities and services.

Community Engagement

 

A robust engagement process was an essential component of the project to provide an evidence base to inform future recreation and other planning. An extensive community engagement process was undertaken from October through December 2017 and targeted engagement with stakeholders continued in early 2018. Promotion of the engagement reached over 17,000 people through a variety of media and over 2,000 people participated in engagement activities through a range of engagement methods. A Community Engagement Report (CER) detailed the outcomes of the engagement process. This report was published on Council’s website in April 2018, notification sent to residents who had expressed an interest during the engagement process and a presentation of the CER undertaken at the Sports Forum in April 2018.

 

Cred Consulting undertook further targeted engagement, condition audits and data analysis throughout the early part of 2018 and the findings were brought together to form the draft Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West report which was presented to Council on 22 May 2018. Council determined that:

 

1.       Council endorse the draft report Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West for public exhibition for 6 weeks;

 

2.       That the public exhibition is widely promoted and all stakeholders and residents who expressed an interest are notified of the opportunity to provide further input; and

 

3.       Following public exhibition, the feedback and amended Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West be reported back to Council.

 

Related items were reported to the meeting of 27 March 2018, when Council considered the resourcing of recreation needs and the potential position of an Office of Sport Coordinator. It was determined that:

 

1.      Council invest $65 million in park and aquatic capital facilities over the next three years, subject to the development and adoption of the 2018/2019 Budget;

 

2.      Council defer the appointment an Office of Sport Coordinator until after the completion of the Recreation Needs Study;

 

3.      The Recreation and Aquatics Service Unit and Office of Sport Coordinator strategically partner with the sporting clubs and key partners to increase participation of girls, women, people from lower socio economic backgrounds and people with disabilities as informed by the Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West;

 

4.      Council progress the Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West to investigate the need and best location for hockey and netball facilities and a hydrotherapy pool; and

 

5.      Council progress the development of the Inner West Sporting Ground Allocation Policy, in consultation with the sporting clubs and that the draft Policy be reported back to Council for adoption.

 

Public Exhibition

The draft Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West (RNS) was placed on public exhibition from 15 June until the 27 July 2018. The opportunity for further engagement on the draft report was widely promoted to all internal and external stakeholders and residents. This included direct email, distribution to patrons at Council owned recreation and aquatic facilities, to sporting organisations that use Council facilities through relevant newsletters and hard copies placed at Customer Service Centres.

 

The public exhibition demonstrated substantial interest from the community and stakeholders with a total of 951 responses received comprising 796 from residents and external organisations in addition to 156 items of feedback from internal Council departments.

 

Respondents were asked to comment on the 6 themes of the strategic framework proposed to inform the development of the draft Recreation Strategy:

·    Theme 1 – Existing gaps in open space and recreation

·    Theme 2 – Future demand for open space and recreation

·    Theme 3 – Capacity for sports and recreation

·    Theme 4 – Inclusion and sharing

·    Theme 5 – Connections with nature

·    Theme 6 – Streets and laneways for walking, cycling and play

 

Respondents were also asked if they wish to comment on any of the recommended opportunities and proactively provide any other comments.

 

Analysis was undertaken on the topics covered in each submission (many submissions included multiple topics) resulting in identification of 969 topics. These have been summarised below to provide a snapshot of the most frequently identified topics under each theme.

 

Theme 1 – Existing gaps in open space and recreation

A total of 130 responses were received covering 163 topics. The most frequently mentioned topics were:

 

Sporting grounds

81

Open space

19

Sporting amenities

11

Footpaths / Trails

10

Play facilities

6

 

Despite extensive promotion, the initial engagement process in 2017 did not receive the level of interest hoped for from organised sporting groups. The renewed interest from sporting participants and organisations is evident in the public exhibition process with “sporting grounds” being the most frequently mentioned topic by some margin with considerable interest in synthetic turf surfaces and a multipurpose hockey field and sporting amenities.

 

Also evident in feedback was the importance to the community of retaining and improving open space as well as walking and cycling along footpaths / trails.

 

Theme 2 – Future demand for open space and recreation

A total of 128 responses were received covering 164 topics. The most frequently mentioned topics were:

 

Sporting grounds

55

Open space

47

Multipurpose open space and facilities

16

Footpaths / Trails

7

Sporting amenities

5

 

As with Theme 1, sporting grounds and open space dominated the majority of responses. It is worth noting the community understands of the importance of multipurpose open space and facilities as a mechanism to deliver on the broad spectrum of recreation needs.

 

Theme 3 – Capacity for sports and recreation

A total of 140 responses were received covering 165 topics. The most frequently mentioned were:

 

Sporting grounds

96

Open space

13

Sporting amenities

8

Multipurpose open space and facilities

8

Footpaths / Trails

5

 

Unsurprisingly, responses were dominated by feedback on sporting grounds, a key focus of this theme and also an indication of the high level of engagement from sporting groups in the public exhibition process.

 

Theme 4 – Inclusion and sharing

A total of 88 responses were received covering 96 topics. The most frequently mentioned topics were:

 

Sporting grounds

23

Inclusive recreation opportunities

22

Dogs

8

Multipurpose open space and facilities

5

Footpaths / Trails

3

 

It is encouraging that the need to share sporting facilities and the provision of recreation opportunities for all members of the community was recognised. Dogs were more evident in this theme with views typically polarised which is consistent with previous feedback on this topic.

 

Theme 5 – Connections with Nature

A total of 82 responses were received covering 96 topics. The most frequently mentioned topics were:

 

Greening / Trees

29

Sporting grounds

8

Footpaths / Trails

7

Nature / Adventure Play

6

Biodiversity

5

Informal recreation

5

Open space

5

 

Responses were more evenly spread under this theme though there was evident support for greening the inner west.

 

Theme 6 – Streets and laneways for walking, cycling and play

A total of 86 responses were received covering 127 topics. The most frequently mentioned topics were:

 

Cycleways / Cycle education

38

Footpaths / Trails

25

Connectivity

14

Greening

10

Streets for recreation

8

 

This theme was dominated by cycling and walking with cycleways and footpaths / trails being the two most frequently mentioned responses. The importance of creating connections was recognised as well as opportunities to connect with nature through greening.

 

Comments on Recommended Opportunities (Comments 1)

A total of 69 responses were received covering 84 topics. The most frequently mentioned topics were:

 

Sporting grounds

39

Support

4

Sporting amenities

4

Connectivity

3

Roller Derby

3

Open Space

3

 

The lower overall response in this section may indicate that respondents had adequately reflected their feedback under the earlier themes and much of the feedback reflected a reproduction of previous comments.

 

Other Comments (Comments 2)

A total of 62 responses were received covering 74 topics. The most frequently mentioned topics were:

 

Sporting grounds

21

Open space

10

Support

6

Connectivity

5

Multipurpose open space and facilities

4

 

As with the comments on recommended opportunities, there was a much lower overall response, possibly indicating that people feel they have been provided sufficient opportunity for input.

 

Key Findings

Despite extensive promotion, the initial engagement process in late 2017 did not receive the level of interest hoped for from organised sporting groups. The public exhibition process demonstrates a significantly higher level of engagement from sports participants and organisations with sporting grounds being the most frequently mentioned topic and considerable interest in synthetic turf surfaces and a multipurpose hockey field. Many responses indicated the preferred location of a future multipurpose hockey facility in the north of the LGA with many mentioning the Rozelle railyards as a potential site. This will be further explored through the development of the Recreation Strategy.

 

The majority of feedback was consistent with the recommended opportunities identified in the draft RNS and did not necessitate many changes to the draft final report. The process also helped highlight items which were discussed in the body of the draft report but which had not translated through into the ‘Recommended Opportunities’ section.

 

While the feedback from form the public exhibition did not result in many changes to the final draft report, the scale of feedback, along with the Community Engagement Report will be a significant determinant in the prioritisation of actions in the draft Recreation Strategy.

 

In conjunction with the Community Engagement Report, the feedback from the public exhibition will be used to prioritise actions in the development of the Recreation Strategy.

 

Changes to the draft Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West

The following list summarises key changes made to the RNS as a result of the public exhibition process:

 

·    Inclusion in recommended opportunities of improved lighting based on community engagement outcomes;

·    Inclusion in recommended opportunities of consideration of recurrent maintenance costs during design and increased maintenance resourcing as a result of new  facilities;

·    Inclusion in recommended opportunities of further investigation of netball needs and facilities;

·    Reference to Gymnastics included in existing recreation facilities as well inclusion in existing and future needs;

·    Inclusion in recommended opportunities of outdoor exercise equipment at appropriate locations;

·    Inclusion in recommended opportunities to review the provision of dog off leash areas in Ashfield;

·    Inclusion in recommended opportunities of continuation and growth of bushcare programs;

·    Increased reference to facilitation of running in recommended opportunities;

·    Include reference to biodiversity features in signage;

·    Increased reference to inclusive design in recommended opportunities;

·    Inclusion in recommended opportunities for promotion across all target population groups;

·    Increased emphasis on inclusive public toilet facilities in recommended opportunities;

·    Strengthened reference to passive recreation in recommended opportunities;

·    Inclusion of community gardens in recommended opportunities;

·    Change of description of small parkland areas from ‘Urban Landscape Amenity’ to ‘Pocket Park’.

·    Inclusion in the body of the report of reference to the social benefit of volunteers and noting the significant numbers involved in organised sport;

·    Broaden recommendation for laneway use to consider public art and multiple use; and

·    Inclusion of worker population in future recreation needs.

 

The public exhibition indicated that there was some confusion as to the 6 themes and the intention and distinction between each. A description of each theme has been added to clarify this as follows:

 

Theme 1 - Address existing gaps in open space and recreation facilities

Addressing the undersupply of open space and recreation facilities (for the current population) through new facilities.

 

Theme 2 - Plan for future demand for new open space and recreation facilities

Planning for new open space and recreation facilities to meet future demand resulting from population growth.

 

Theme 3 - Increase capacity of existing recreation facilities

Getting more from what we have by improving the quality and function of existing open space and recreation facilities to increase capacity to address current undersupply and future demand.

 

Theme 4 - Streets and laneways for walking, running, cycling and play

Reimagining our streets and laneways as recreation spaces to increase access to recreation opportunities.

 

Theme 5 - Inclusion and sharing

Supporting increased use and access to recreation opportunities for diverse community members. Encouraging sharing of open space and recreation facilities for a range of users and uses.

 

Theme 6 - Connection with nature

Providing opportunities to connect with nature, improve health and wellbeing and addressing climate and heat impacts.

 

The order of the themes in the final document has been changed from the draft public exhibition report so that Theme 3 (Increase capacity of existing recreation facilities) is followed by Theme 4 (Streets and laneways for walking, running, cycling and play), as they both relate to increasing the capacity of what we have rather than the provision of new facilities. Specifically, Theme 4 focuses on increasing the capacity of streets to provide for recreation. 

 

All the above changes are reflected in the amended final RNS attached to this report (ATTACHMENT 1).

 

Given the quantity of response from the community and stakeholders, the quantity of changes proposed to the final draft RNS are proportionately low with many changes as a result of multiple responses on the same item. The relatively low number of changes is indicative that the coverage of recreation needs in the final report closely matches community and stakeholder needs.

 

The feedback also highlighted numerous operational items or matters related to current projects and these have been passed onto the relevant areas of Council to be followed up. There were also multiple suggestions for actions and projects which will be considered in the development of the Recreation Strategy.

 

Current projects and programs

It is worth noting that throughout the development of the draft RNS and public exhibition process, a number of initiatives have been undertaken concurrently which are consistent with the needs identified in the RNS. Relevant items include:

 

·    Recreation Programs

-     Women and girls (Mums Get Active, Girls Get Active)

-     Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities – noticeably programs targeting refugees and activating the Welcome Refugee Centre;

-     Seniors activities – Council currently has a total offering of 169 program opportunities for seniors per week and development of a brochure is underway to promote this to a wider audience;

-     Free fitness classes for the community in parks at two locations across the LGA.

·    Skate activities – three events have been scheduled at Sydenham Green skatepark in October 2018 plus a series of clinics targeting female skaters funded through the Recreation Grants program;

·    Investigations have commenced with NSW Department of Education on potential access to school facilities for community recreation;

·    Sportsground Allocation Policy – this was recently reported to Council and has been endorsed for public exhibition;

·    Review of management options for Annette Kellerman and Fanny Durack Aquatic Centres;

·    A project to investigate the feasibility of synthetic turf at locations across the inner west;

·    Design and delivery of multipurpose courts at Richard Murden Reserve;

·    Development and adoption of the Greenway Master Plan;

·    Investigations for a regional skatepark in the north of the LGA;

·    Delivery of Waterfront sporting ground at Callan Park; and

·    Plan of Management and Master Plan for Marrickville Golf Course.

 

While the development of the Recreation Strategy is underway, a number of projects delivering on identified needs in the final RNS have been included in staff work plans for 2018/19:

 

·    Development of the Recreation Strategy;

·    Play Streets pilot program;

·    Nature Play Space pilot program;

·    Development of a centralised booking system;

·    Activation of skateparks through events and promotion;

·    Review of the management of the Robyn Webster Sports Centre;

·    Improved information on and promotion of recreation opportunities in the inner west, especially to CALD communities;

·    Harmonisation of fees and charges for parks and sporting grounds;

·    Development of a Parks Plans of Management Strategy to prioritise their review and development; and

·    Plan of Management and Master Plan for Dulwich Hill Parklands.

 

Office of Sport

Council has resolved to investigate an Office of Sport to partner with sporting clubs to achieve increased participation in sport and in particular among target groups identified in the RNS. A separate report will be prepared for Council’s consideration on this matter.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

A part of the project a report was completed by Jones Lang La Salle providing an analysis of the recreation needs identified in the RNS and indicative costs for land acquisition for potential open space, community facilities and sporting grounds upgrades including synthetic turf. This will inform the development of the Recreation Strategy which will develop a 10 year plan of prioritised and costed actions and projects across Council including capital costs and increased maintenance, operational and long term renewal costs.  This will inform the future 4 year Delivery Programs, Asset Management Plans and the Long Term Financial Plan.

 

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Extensive engagement has been undertaken with internal staff throughout the RNS project including a Project Working Group made up of key internal stakeholders and extensive liaison with a broad cross section of relevant areas of Council during the early phases of the project and once again through the more recent public exhibition period.

 

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

A robust engagement process was an essential component of the project to provide the evidence base for future planning. An extensive community engagement process was undertaken from October through December 2017 and targeted engagement with stakeholders continued in early 2018. Promotion of the engagement reached over 17,000 people through a variety of media and over 2,000 people participated in engagement activities through a range of engagement methods.

 

Further opportunity for input has been provided through the public exhibition process with the community and stakeholders demonstrating substantial interest with a total of 796 responses from residents and external organisations.

 

 

CONCLUSION

The independent Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West takes a holistic view of the recreation spectrum and presents a detailed analysis of the current recreation landscape in the Inner West, emerging trends and issues, and an extensive range of recommended opportunities.

 

The extensive level of engagement with the community and stakeholders has provided a robust evidence base to inform future planning across Council and the identification of recreation needs in the final report closely matches those identified by the community and stakeholders. The ongoing engagement of key internal teams through the Project Working Group has ensured that needs identified in the final report will readily transfer into future planning documents, notably the 7.11 Contributions Plan (formerly Section 94) and the Recreation Strategy.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Recreation Needs Study: A Healthier Inner West - Final Draft Oct18

  


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 6

Subject:         Waterfront Sporting Ground-Cricket Nets Location           

Prepared By:     Aaron Callaghan - Parks Planning and Engagement Manager  

Authorised By:  Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

 

SUMMARY

This report highlights the outcomes of discussions between respective sporting clubs, Balmain South Sydney Cricket Club and Balmain and District Football Club, along with the Office of Environment and Heritage on a new location for cricket nets on the Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground at Callan Park. The new location advocated by the sporting clubs and supported by OEH represents a departure from the approved Development Application. Consultation on a possible departure from this proposal has also been undertaken with the Friends of Callan Park.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.         Proceed with the installation of the cricket nets in the original Development Application approved site as per DA/2017/313, noting the significant risks associated with departing from this location;

 

2.         Note the significant number of heritage listed trees which will need to be removed should the proposal proceed and the detrimental impacts this will have on the open space qualities of the Waterfront Precinct;

 

3.         Consider revisiting the location of the cricket nets at a future time when             either:

 

(a)  an adopted Landscape Structure Plan is completed for Callan Park or

(b) the Callan Master Plan is adopted and the Callan Park and Broughton Hall Trust is established.

 

4.         Retain the current alignment of the fence on the north-western side of the             sporting ground noting that this area is a turning area for vehicles leaving the             Waterfront Precinct and as a site for emergency parking for ambulances which             may need to service the sporting field; and

 

5.         Note that a formal review of the current alignment of the fence on the north-western side of the sporting ground could be undertaken in the future, once car parking arrangements and realignment of the Bay Run are addressed as part of a landscape and traffic management plan for this area.

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

During the preparation of a Development Application for the Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground upgrade project, Council officers engaged with the Balmain South Sydney Cricket Club (BSSCC) regarding the club’s requirements in relation to the location of the cricket nets. For some 12 years the club has been advocating for the delivery of cricket training facilities within this area of Callan Park. Cricket was the inaugural sport played on the Waterfront Drive playing field in the early days of the asylum facility.

As part of the original DA, the cricket club requested and supported the need for three cricket nets.

 

The design associated with this work was focused on an evidence based assessment process which included:

·    Cricket Australia Guidelines for Outdoor Training Facilities (Cricket Nets)

·    Location of existing heritage listed trees

·    Location of existing facilities (sport & non-sport)

·    Current and proposed sporting ground use

·    Cricket Club needs

·    Available budget

·    Safety factors for sporting ground use

 

Importantly the Development Application recognised the need for a shared community facility and one which was not dominated by one sport in particular.

 

Approved Development Application (D-2017/313)

 

The approved DA specifies the location for the Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground cricket nets. The nets are located on the southern side of the Waterfront Sporting Ground (Refer to Fig1.0).  The approved site was assessed and supported by the NSW Heritage Council and was also deemed an acceptable location by the Inner West Local Planning Panel. Both Balmain and District Football Club (BDFC) and BSSCC participated in the DA process. It is noted that the soccer club was dissatisfied at the time with the determination on this matter.

 

Previous Council Resolution

 

At the Council meeting on the 25 September 2018, Council resolved:

 

THAT Council:

1.   Note the concerns regarding safety and use of the cricket nets in their current and proposed location;

2.   Note that discussions are currently ongoing between the Balmain District Football Club, Balmain South Sydney Cricket Club and the Office of Environment and Health (OEH) regarding an appropriate location for the cricket nets at Waterfront Oval;

3.   Consult with the Friends of Callan Park on the location for the cricket nets; and

4.   Receives a report back regarding:

a.   the relocation of the cricket nets pending completion of discussions between the Balmain District Football Club, Balmain South Sydney Cricket Club and OEH;

b.   the proposal to realign the fence on the north-western side of the sporting ground to improve functionality of the grounds; and

c.   the process to submit a 4.55 (2) modification application.

 

Landscape Structure Plan

 

The Callan Park site is owned by NSW Health, with the office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) being the delegated and responsible government agency for the day to day management of Callan Park. OEH are currently in the process of developing a Landscape Structure Plan for Callan Park. This plan is focused on the assessment of built form within the park and the longer term aim of the creation of urban parkland. The study builds on previous work by Council, including the Draft Callan Park Master Plan. The Plan once completed will identify structures within the park which are deemed intrusive and should be removed to enhance the open space qualities of the parkland and create a landscape which is unified in appearance, connectively and functionality. Government has provided no firm time line on when a draft plan will be completed or exhibited. OEH has however been working closely, as the government agent, with Council on the redevelopment of the Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground and has previously signed off on the approved development application site for the cricket nets.

 

Safety Concerns and Warm Up Areas

 

Council officers note that BDFC has recently raised concerns in relation to the safety of the cricket nets during winter training or during weekend match play.  To eliminate the soccer club’s concerns, Council will install gates on the cricket nets for the facility to be locked during winter sporting events. It should be noted that at Easton Park there are similar circumstances and the cricket nets here operate successfully with soccer use of the sporting ground. In addition to this, the Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground site has ample areas for the soccer club players to warmup pre-game including on the canal side of the sporting ground and around the periphery of the sporting ground.

 

Alternative Location for Cricket Nets

 

On the 15th October 2018, Council officers received confirmation from BDFC and BSSCC on their preferred alternative location for cricket nets at the Waterfront Sporting Ground. The new proposal reduces the number of  cricket nets to two nets.  The alternative location as opposed to the approved DA location is highlighted in Fig 1.0 below:

 

Fig 1.0 Approved DA Location and Alternative Location for Cricket Nets Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground

 

 

Sporting Club’s Position

 

The two representative sporting clubs have highlighted the following in support of the alternative location:

 

The alternative site was chosen with reference to the consultant's design principles as it:

 

1.   Is directly accessible to the sports fields but does not impact any facet of them (warm-up and spectator areas);

2.   Will be accessible all year round, ensuring better utilisation of a community facility;

3.   Allows significant run up and run-off zones into safe space;

4.   Is complimentary to the possible future creation of an active zone in and around B496 and allows for an open area of approximately 30m between the nets and B496;

5.   Is in keeping with the OEH consultants' desire to maintain sight-lines and views from significant areas and buildings on the site (the original location works directly against this intention and, once the Pavilion is removed, would be a blight on the important views and access from Building 497 and Military Rd to the Waterfront

 

OEH Positon

 

The alternative location for the cricket nets has been supported in principal by OEH staff.

OEH has indicated that they support a compromise position on this matter and that the revised location broadly meets the aims of the Landscape Structure Plan under development. OEH has also indicated that they have no issues with the approved DA location for the Cricket nets. 

 

Consultation with the Friends of Callan Park

 

As per the Council resolution, the Friends of Callan Park have also been consulted on the alternative location and have advised that they do not support the revised location of the cricket nets. The Friends of Callan Park have provided a detailed submission (Attachment 1) on the proposal. In summary, the Friends of Callan Park support the original DA approved location for the cricket nets and highlight that the new location is a community space that should be shared by the wider community. The Friends of Callan Park support the retention of heritage listed trees.

 

Council Officer Comments

 

The new proposed location was referred to Council’s Urban Forest team.  The proposal is not supported by Council officers on the following grounds:

 

·    The proposed relocation of the cricket nets will have a significant impact on a number of significant trees within that location so much so that, seven trees (including three significant trees) will require removal and, a major large diameter first order branch of one tree will need to be pruned back to the branch union with the trunk. Council’s Tree Management Controls and Urban Forest Policy have a focus on protecting and maintaining trees unless there is strong justification to support their removal. This is particularly relevant to a site such as Callan Park (an item of State Heritage Significance) whereby the tree canopy forms an integral part of the site’s curtilage.

  

·    The area proposed was observed to be largely undisturbed and as such, it is considered that there would most likely be many feeder roots within this area. In addition, a number of large diameter surface roots were noted (particularly where the Liquidambar is located) suggesting that the soil profile may be quite low. The anticipated scope of works would include the raising of soil levels and the installation of a large concrete slab within the TPZ. It is considered that these works would hamper the trees’ ability to thrive and as such, it would have a detrimental impact on their long term viability. Furthermore, given the existing site constraints, adequate and appropriate compensatory tree planting within this area to offset tree removal will not able to be achieved.

 

·    This area of the park has high value as an area of passive open space and is currently used and enjoyed by the wider community including spectators enjoying watching summer sports under the shade of the tree line canopy. Removing established mature trees in this area of the park will be detrimental to the landscape structure of the waterfront precinct and in terms of planning approvals there is a high risk that the proposal will be declined both in terms of landscape and heritage assessment phases of a revised development application. 

 

Given the above, the proposal cannot be supported in its current format and it is recommended that the existing proposed location of the cricket nets (an area where no trees will be affected) be retained.

 

Realignment of Current Fencing Arrangements

 

In terms of realigning the current fencing arrangements on the north-western side of the sporting ground to improve functionality of the grounds, this proposal is not supported given the current status of car parking arrangements along the Waterfront and immediately to the north west of the pavilion. The current use of this site as a turning area needs to be retained as does its use for emergency vehicles and importantly as a safe drop off zone for children utilising the sporting facilities. Any future plans to realign this area could be considered once a traffic and landscape plan is finalised for the Waterfront area by Government.  

 

Section 4.55 (2) Process

 

Should Council resolve to proceed with lodging a Section 4.55 (2) application for the proposed alternative location for the cricket nets, the following process would apply:

 

·    New plans for the alternative site would need to be developed;

·    Amend Heritage Impact Statement to address the proposal’s compliance with the Conservation Management Plans (already in place) applicable to the site and submit with the application;

·    Amend the hydraulics plans and details and submit with the application;

·    The State Government would need to sign owner’s consent on the Section 4.55 (2) application, which would then be lodged;

·    The Section 4.55 (2) application would be referred to NSW Heritage for approval, as an integrated development;

·    Public notification of the Section 4.55 (2) application;

·    Comments would be sought from relevant technical experts, including arborist comments;

·    An independent planner would be engaged to consider the proposed Section 4.55 (2) application and to prepare the planning report; and

·    The Section 4.55 (2) application would be considered independently by the Inner West Planning Panel.

 

The Section 4.55 (2) application is likely to take at least six months to determine.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The estimated cost to prepare and lodge the Section 4.55 (2) application is $20,000.

 

Should Council resolve to proceed with the Section 4.55 (2) application, this will require a senior Council officer to be taken from their current duties and it will result in delays to the delivery of other parks capital works projects, including the Cooks River Parklands upgrade and the Richard Murden netball courts.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Council’s Urban Forest team has provided comments which are outlined in the report.

 


 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

The Friends of Callan Park, The Office of Environment and Heritage and the representative sporting bodies have been consulted in the preparation of this report.

 

 

CONCLUSION

During the original Development Application process there was significant opportunity for the community sporting bodies to comment on the redevelopment proposals for the Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground upgrade. The DA which has been approved for the Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground was assessed independently by Council officers, the NSW Heritage Council and final determination on the DA was made by the by the Inner West Local Planning Panel.

 

Council received an alternative proposal for the location of cricket nets by the respective sporting clubs. The location proposed has a high risk of not proceeding and is not supported by Council officers or the Friends of Callan Park. The location proposed involves the removal of a significant number of mature and highly valued park trees which support the landscape values in this area of the park.  It is therefore recommended that the existing proposed location of the cricket nets (in an area where no trees will be affected) be retained and works on delivering the cricket nets continue to proceed. Safety issues associated with use of the nets have been addressed.  Finally, Council officers note that there is ample room for soccer warm up around the periphery of the sporting field. 

 

The construction program for Waterfront Drive Sporting Ground has the concrete slab for the DA approved cricket nets due to be installed within the next few weeks.  Council staff intend to proceed with the works unless Council resolves otherwise.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Attachment 1-Friends of Callan Park Submission.

  


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 7

Subject:         Swimming In Parramatta River - New Site for Inner West           

Prepared By:     Jean Brennan - Urban Ecology Manager 

Authorised By:  Jan Orton - Group Manager Sustainability and Environment

 

SUMMARY

Inner West Council has supported the Parramatta River Catchment Group’s aim of making Parramatta River swimmable by 2025 since the Our Living River initiative made it a goal in 2014. The joint effort has culminated in the Draft Ten Steps to a Swimmable River - the Parramatta River Masterplan, launched on Thursday 18 October for Public Exhibition. This report responds to Council’s recommendation at the 24 April 2018 meeting regarding C0418 Item 3, Improving Inner West Waterways, to provide a report following the endorsement of the Parramatta River Master Plan on investigations into a swim site at Callan Park. It outlines progress and steps needed to activate a swimming site at Callan Park, describing what needs to occur to deliver this goal as soon as practicable.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Promotes opportunities for comment on the Draft Ten Steps to a Swimmable River - the Parramatta River Master Plan by the Parramatta River Catchment Group via Council’s usual communications and media;

2.   Notes that the Parramatta River Catchment Group and Council will use the National Health and Medical Research Council 2008, Guidelines for Managing Risks in Recreational Water and NSW Health  guidelines as the risk and evidence based approach for confirming a swim site in Callan Park;

3.   Notes that the preferred site to investigate for swimming in Callan Park is the Callan Park Seawall site as the Callan Park Beach site is not recommended for activation as a swimming site due significant Aboriginal and ecological heritage in the surrounding area;

4.   Considers an allocation of funding of $45,000, to support chemicals in water and sediment testing to inform the decision-making process for swim site activation at the Callan Park Seawall site.

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

Inner West Council has been an active member of the Parramatta River Catchment Group (PRCG) since it formed in 2008. The PRCG has 14 financial members, comprising 11 councils, Sydney Water Corporation, the Department of Planning and Environment and the NSW Environment Protection Authority. It has coordinated catchment-wide strategy and planning, focusing on all-of-catchment approaches for greater improvements than individual agencies working separately. 

 

Our Living River with Masterplan for swim sites

Since its launch in 2014, Inner West Council has provided continuous support for the Our Living River initiative (with Councillor Drury as the current Chair of the Parramatta River Catchment Group) that aims to make the Parramatta River a ‘living river’ and swimmable by 2025.

 

To achieve the Our Living River mission, the PRCG has developed the Draft Ten Steps to a Swimmable River - the Parramatta River Masterplan, launched during the Parramatta River Study Tour on Thursday 18 October, 2018 for public exhibition. The Masterplan’s objectives are to:

·    Improve the health of the river

·    Strategically tackle issues of sewer and stormwater pollution

·    Provide tangible benefits to the local community

·    Provide the best cost-benefit for the community

 

The Masterplan outlines three priority sites that have commitment from their councils to create swimming sites, with the next steps already underway to activate these sites:

·    Bayview Park and McIlwaine Park in City of Canada Bay, and

·    Putney Park in the City of Ryde

 

The other nine proposed ‘shortlisted’ locations in the Masterplan are being considered further, including Callan Park, which is continuing to be investigated due to the high level of interest for activating it for swimming.

 

Callan Park is owned by the NSW Health. On 29 May 2015, responsibility for the Callan Park (Special Provisions) Act 2002 transferred to the Minister for the Environment. The Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) is responsible for the care, control and management of most of Callan Park, including the seawall area proposed as a potential swim site.   

This report addresses the recommendation from C0418 Item 3 Improving Inner West Waterways at Council meeting 24 April, 2018 that Council:

1.   Receives a further report following the endorsement of the Our Living River Masterplan by the Parramatta River Catchment Group - on investigations into the Callan Park swim site.

 

It provides an update on investigations and describes the next steps, focusing on the immediate action to be taken.

 

REPORT

SWIM SITE AT CALLAN PARK

Selecting and activating a site at Callan Park has involved/involves the steps outlined in the Parramatta River Swim Site Activation Framework, 2018 summarised here, and detailed further in the Investigations section of the report.

1.   Background research - Between 2016 and 2018, potential sites along Parramatta River were investigated for water quality, community desirability, ecological health and swim site activation, including sites at Callan Park by the PRCG and councils/landowners interested in swimming sites.

2.   Engagement - Discussions between land managers, owners, and users (on Aboriginal and colonial heritage, community uses and needs) have commenced and are ongoing.  

3.   Health and Safety - Complying with the relevant risk-based approaches (National Health and Medical Research Council 2008, Guidelines for Managing Risks in Recreational Water guidelines and NSW Health  guidelines) and building on initial investigations, more detailed and long-term water and sediment quality testing for pathogens and chemicals, assessments of bathymetry and bed hazards and seawall/bank stability.

4.   Governance - Responsibility for decision making, resourcing, and ongoing management and operation of the selected site are to be discussed and agreed following the formation of an interagency group after approval for activation is received.

5.   Site Activation and Management Plan – Discussions to agree on the responsibility and resourcing of the development and implementation of the site activation plan and subsequent management plan following the formation of the interagency group. An options study will be done before development of concept and detailed designs leading to construction, and the management plan for operations and management.

Inner West Council’s Immediate focus

To work towards a swimming site in Callan Park, two immediate steps need to be addressed:

1.   Confirming the site -  Two sites were proposed for further investigation – the Callan Park Seawall west of Callan Point and the old baths ruins, and Callan Park Beach to the east of Callan Point.

The Callan Park Seawall site has been given in-principle support by OEH, and is the preferred long term site for activation as a swim site, subject to the water and sediment quality meeting the health and safety requirements (confirmed in pers. communication 10-10-18).  The Beach site is not recommended as a swimming site by Council staff and OEH as following engagement with the community and a review of technical information, the site has been found to have significant Aboriginal and ecological heritage.

 

2.   Making certain water quality is suitable - OEH has initiated its Beachwatch program at the site; however, its current approach will take two years to get the required number of samples.  Council could supplement this testing to ensure adequate samples can be taken within a shorter timeframe – see report below.

 

INVESTIGATIONS FOR AN INNER WEST SWIM SITE

1.   Background Research

 

Site activation framework

Three sites at Callan Park were identified and assessed between 2016-2018 with the following two options proposed for potential activation as reported in the Parramatta River Swim Site Activation Framework, 2018.

1.   Callan Park Beach - east of Callan Point 

The natural rocky and beach shore area with fringing native vegetation was identified as having some potential activation for swimming but limited in catering for significant numbers. The site assessment identified that the beach is used by local dogs and their owners, to store boats, and is not far from moored boats.

Although Beachwatch is currently monitoring water quality (pathogens) at this site, following engagement regarding the Aboriginal heritage, the beach is not recommended due to its proximity to sensitive and significant Aboriginal Heritage, and potential impacts on the local ecology.

2.   Callan Park Seawall - west of Callan Point 

The seawall area to the west of Callan Point and the old bath ruins, and immediately adjacent to the open lawn and scattered trees, has significant potential for activation for swimming. It has received support from Aboriginal officers in relation to its appropriateness with the area’s Aboriginal heritage, and in-principle support from OEH.

Opportunities here are the:

1.   high activation potential due to its location on the popular Bay Run

2.   excellent potential for ecological sea wall restoration

3.   the large number of fish

4.   significant potential for relatively easy activation for swimming

 

The site assessments identified:

 

1.   erosion of the sea wall in some locations

2.   significant fill of varying quality at the site

3.   hazards on the sea bed in this area

4.   large services and submarine cables which need to be considered

5.   potentially many different users needing to be accommodated, including people using the Bay Run for walking, running, cycling and recreation, and sports clubs and their players

6.   the need to consider the important heritage of the site

7.   governance as an important consideration

 

The Site Activation Framework report identifies the key strategic next steps as seeking State Government support (as the owners and managers of the land) for activation of the selected site and developing a plan to develop the sites. The plan would be to activate the seawall area for ‘splash’ contact in the short term and for swimming in the medium to long term.

 

2.   Engagement

 

Since April 2018, Council officers have continued to work with the PRCG Coordinator, relevant Aboriginal Heritage advisors, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) staff and university researchers on investigations to keep the Callan Park site activation progressing as outlined below.

 

Aboriginal Heritage

At an on-site meeting in June, the Callan Point Seawall site was supported by Aboriginal advisors. It was also noted that this area is on reclaimed land. The Callan Park Beach site as mentioned above was not supported due to the need for access routes which would impact on sensitive areas, including significant heritage middens and carvings.

State Government

The PRCG Coordinator and Council officers have been in ongoing discussions with OEH and Environment Protection Agency (EPA) staff regarding assisting with water quality testing and determining roles and the way forward to swim site activation.

 

University of NSW

Discussions are ongoing with University of NSW (UNSW) researchers regarding:

·    water and sediment testing for chemicals and supplementing the Beachwatch data

·    doing a bathymetry study

·    developing the site management plan. 

 


 

Inner West Council

Preliminary advice and input has been sought internally on Council’s relevant policies, plans and resources.

 

Community

Community engagement is planned to seek feedback on the Draft Ten Steps to a Swimmable River - the Parramatta River Master Plan. Following approval to progress the swim site, further community engagement will occur.

 

3.   Health and Safety

 

The OEH has provided in-principle support for the Callan Park Seawall site, acknowledging that west of Callan Point has the best potential. However, OEH requires health risks to be investigated and managed in accordance with the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Guidelines for Managing risks in Recreational Waters (national guidelines) prior to activation approval (pers. communication 21-9-18)

 

Practical steps to activate the site for splash contact and swimming can continue to be made once the water and sediment quality has been determined as suitable in terms of pathogens and chemical contaminants.

 

1.   Water and Sediment Quality testing

Pathogens - Beachwatch

Water samples are collected as part of OEH’s routine Beachwatch monitoring program in Sydney Harbour/lower Parramatta River with data collected weekly from October to April, and monthly from May to September. Water samples test for the bacteria Enterococci as an important indicator of faecal contamination and exposure pathways in recreational waters based on concentration benchmarks.

 

At the request of the PRCG, Beachwatch has been monitoring water quality at the two sites originally proposed on the Callan Park waterfront at Callan Park Seawall and Callan Park Beach, shown on the maps below, since July 2018.

 

Consistent with NHMRC national guidelines, Beachwatch relies on the long-term assessment of water quality before determining whether the site is suitable for swimming, ensuring water quality is assessed in all weather conditions. Water quality is mainly assessed through faecal indicators with concerns predominantly focused on sewer overflows.

 

     

Callan Park Seawall water quality sampling site              Callan Park Beach water quality sampling site.

 

 

Sampling requirements

The national guideline recommends at least 100 water samples are included in the risk assessment. Under the current Beachwatch sampling regime, it will take at least two years to collect the amount required. While swim sites can be assigned a provisional beach grade using less data, it is noted the analysis is incomplete due to limited bacterial data. Beachwatch does not have the capacity to collect data more frequently but has agreed that if the data has proven quality assurance for collection and analysis methods, it could also be included in the assessment to reduce the amount of time taken to collect the 100 data points required.

 

Professor Stuart Khan from the UNSW is able to assist with this data collection if Council resolves to expedite the process. His team could supplement the Beachwatch data at a cost of approximately $5,000. There are savings in the Urban Ecology budget this year that cacn voer this work and fast tracking the sampling and once all parties (OEH, Council, PRCG and UNSW) agree on collection and laboratory analysis methods, implementation and quality assurance standards, this work could be completed by 30 June, 2019.

 

Beachwatch has indicated it would not be able to promote Callan Park as a swimming site until sufficient data has been analysed to provide the evidence to show that it is suitable for swimming. Nonetheless, it recognises that since there are no major stormwater drains discharging near the site, and that the location is in the lower part of the embayment, it would expect water quality to be suitable for swimming in dry weather conditions.

 

Sydney Water is investigating running a Riverwatch program. However, timeframes and associated costs have not been established.

 

 

Chemicals in water and sediment - UNSW

To accord with the NSW Health requirements for swimming sites, Professor Khan from UNSW is also working with the PRCG and Council to measure the most appropriate chemical contaminants in water and sediment that may impact suitability for swimming for the three sites outlined in the draft Parramatta River Masterplan, and for the Callan Park site.

 

To fast-track the data collection at Callan Park, Council has been in discussions with Professor Khan regarding commencing this work as soon as practicable and has received a cost estimate based on pricing schedules from the National Measurement Institute analytical laboratory (Table 1 below).

 

The table below shows the relevant chemical contaminants for the risk assessment for swimming suitability. Sufficient toxicity data exists for these chemicals to provide analysis to determine whether any positive samples are at safe concentrations levels.

 

Table 1. Chemicals and costs for water and sediment analysis by National Measurement Institute for UNSW (4/10/18).

 

 Chemical

Per sample

No. Samples

 Total

Water

PFAS (Perfluoroalkyl Sulfonate)

$180

10

$1,800

 

BTEX etc. (from crude oil - benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene)

$135

10

$1,350

 

Pesticides (Organochlorine, Organophosphorous, Polychlorinated Biphenyls)

$70

10

$700

 

Dioxins (TCDD and PCBs)

$2,355

8

$18,840

 

 

 

 

 

Sediment

PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons)

$55

10

$550

 

Dioxins + PCBs

$2,355

8

$18,840

 

Heavy metals

$28

10

$280

 

Pesticides (Organochlorine, Organophosphorous, Polychlorinated Biphenyls)

70

10

$700

 TOTAL

 

 

$43,060

 

Given its proximity to Iron Cove and its industrial history of contaminations, a rigorous assessment that meets the requisite National and NSW Health guidelines needs to be ensured in assessing chemical contaminants. Monitoring and analysis of the contaminants listed in Table 1 should provide a sufficiently comprehensive and detailed assessment of the water and sediment from an ecosystem and human health perspective in a manner appropriate to the historical land use context of the seawall location. It is possible that the work could be done within a three month period and completed by 30 June 2019 at a cost to Council of less than $45,000, should Council resolve this project. 

 

2.   Bathymetry and riverbed hazards

Assessing the bathymetry (depths) and riverbed hazards would also involve NSW Roads and Maritime Services. Potential for UNSW to do this work has been suggested and is being explored.

 

The bathymetry (depths) is not known so a study needs to be done. There are a range of hazards on the bed at the Callan Park Seawall site including oysters, rocks, fill and dumped material (e.g. concrete, reo, bricks, and glass). This requires a visual check of the area at low tide and a dive study of the river bed for physical hazards. The use of shark netting may also need to be explored. 

This work would commence following the assessment of water quality.

 

4.   Governance

 

Callan Park management

Callan Park is owned by NSW Health. A large portion of the park, including the areas originally proposed as potential swim activation sites, is managed by the National Parks Division of OEH on an interim basis. Roads and Maritime Services is responsible for the adjacent riverbed. 

 

OEH is sympathetic to the Seawall site activation providing it supports the objectives of Callan Park and is activated using an evidence and risk-based approach as required by the national guidelines. Its officers have been working with the PRCG Coordinator to set up the Beachwatch program there and supporting her and Council staff to determine the processes involved for the future stages. While approval to proceed with the activation of the seawall site is pending, OEH is supportive of Council proceeding to expedite the water quality and to plan the timetable for development of the activation project.

 

No other commitment from OEH for the seawall site has occurred at this stage.  

 

Interagency group

If and when OEH approves a site for activation, a Callan Park swim site interagency group will be formed.  It will determine matters such as:

·    planning controls (e.g. Heritage)

·    ownership, operation and maintenance of the resulting infrastructure

·    funding sources (no funding currently available from OEH, nor allocated in Council budgets)

·    ongoing integration of water and sediment quality data to understand the complete picture

 

5.   Site Activation and Management Plan

 

Developing the seawall site activation plan for short-term and longer-term activation will include:

1.   Engagement: community and stakeholder engagement to understand the existing site uses and needs 

2.   Feasibility studies including (but not limited to):

a.   Confirming water and sediment quality assessments;

b.   Investigating bathymetry and bed hazards, and potential options for a constructed swimming pool type option

c.   River dynamics including flow conditions and high velocity rates in wet weather 

d.   Land availability study to determine any heritage and service constraints

e.   Assessing the seawall condition and stability

3.   Governance:  agreeing on governance arrangements for the selected swim site.

Design and construction

The swim site options report will be informed by the engagement and feasibility studies and potentially developing on existing Callan Park plans including the landscape structure plan. Following the selection of the preferred option for the site activation approach, concept plans and detailed designs for the construction of the seawall swim site will be developed. 

Management plan

Reflecting the agreed governance arrangements, a multistakeholder approach needs to be used to develop the site management plan for the ongoing management and operation of the swim site.

 

UNSW has identified a potential research partnership with a PhD student from the Faculty of the Built Environment able to undertake this work, and would need approval from OEH. 

 

NEXT STEPS

1.   Confirm water quality monitoring and sediment testing for chemicals and complementing the Beachwatch pathogens monitoring

2.   Engage with community and other stakeholders on the draft Parramatta River Masterplan and Callan Park Seawall area uses and needs

3.   Seek a partnership with OEH to develop the swim site activation plan - continue to work with OEH and other stakeholders on governance and planning the steps and securing funding for bathymetry (depths) and riverbed hazards, site planning, design and management.

 


 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Immediate costs 

Immediate costs to Council of expediting data collection by mid-2019 through UNSW will be less than $50,000 (Table 2).

 

Table 2.

Sampling and analysis

Approach 

Total

1.   Supplement Beachwatch collection

Additional Enterococci samples

$5,000

2.   Chemical data collection

Water and sediment data collection as per Table 1.

$43,060

 

A $5,000 is available for monitoring in the Urban Ecology program budget for 2018/19. This can cover the monitoring to supplement the Beachwatch collections. However there is no budget for the additional Chemical data collection for water and sediments and Council will need to identify a funding source in order for the analysis to be complete.

 

Longer-term cost considerations

There will be financial implications for feasibility studies, including bathymetry, and the site assessment, detailed design, and capital works and ongoing management and monitoring. However, until an options report of potential action scenarios is completed, these costs are not able to be estimated.

 

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Advice was sought and received from the Parks Planning Manager, Recreation Manager, Aquatic Facilities Manager. Matters raised include:

·    the need to take a risk management approach as per national guidelines

·    liability – understanding the risks for Council in an open water setting

·    concern regarding the ownership and basis if Council operates and maintains a swim site (lease, licence)

·    the recreation needs study has not identified this as a need - existing sites nearby, including Dawn Fraser Baths, are already available for swimming; a swim site for activation is already identified in Sydney Harbour in the Mort Bay Masterplan 

·    net shortfall in funding for the capital upgrade Dawn Fraser Baths of approximately $2 million which have been costed as part of an integrated master plan for the pool

·    Dawn Fraser Baths should be the foremost priority of Council in terms of a swimmable Parramatta River

·    resources required, including need for upkeep

 

 

CONCLUSION

The steps to activate the Callan Park Seawall site are dependent on approvals being given that are reliant upon satisfactory water quality results being in line with the national guidelines targets for recreation in waterways and NSW Health guidelines.  Council can potentially shorten the timeframe for gaining sufficient results by supporting additional water quality monitoring for pathogens to the current Beachwatch program. UNSW can augment this work with the chemical sampling and exposure pathways risk assessment.

 

For UNSW to collect and analyse the chemical and supplementary pathogen water quality data by mid-late next year, the cost to Council is estimated to be less than $50,000.

 

Taking a partnership approach with UNSW (that includes very significant in-kind support) rather than waiting for Beachwatch and future Riverwatch Program results may be the best approach to take. It optimises benefits from the costs expended in terms of time and budget.  Co-funding the Riverwatch Program would also require additional sources of funding from Council, where seeking additional sources of funding (grants etc.) would involve more and unpredictable delays.

 

Making the river swimmable requires successfully addressing water and sediment quality issues first. Following that, it depends on Council and its catchment partners working towards the collective vision through coordinated interagency efforts.

 

References

McGregor Coxhall, 2018, Parramatta River Swim Site Activation Framework, report commissioned by the Parramatta River Catchment Group. Available:  http://www.ourlivingriver.com.au/content/uploads/2018/08/Parramatta-River-Swimming-Site-Activation-Framework-Final-Report-180713.pdf;

National Health and Medical Research Council 2008, Guidelines for Managing Risks in Recreational Water https://nhmrc.gov.au/sites/default/files/images/guidelines-for-managing-risks-in-recreational-water.pdf

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 8

Subject:         Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan for a common customer focussed resource recovery and waste management service            

Prepared By:     Jan Orton - Group Manager Sustainability and Environment 

Authorised By:  Elizabeth Richardson - Deputy General Manager Assets and Environment

 

SUMMARY

Inner West Council (IWC) was created on 12 May 2016 from the merger of Ashfield, Leichhardt and Marrickville councils. Serving the new, inner west community of over 185,000 residents across 26 suburbs, Inner West Council is 1,250 staff strong. As part of the development of a single IWC approach to resource recovery IWC through the Community Strategic Plan has as one of its key objectives to become: A zero waste community with an active share economy by 2036.

Under the IWC Delivery Program and Operational Plan the Resource Recovery Planning and Services teams provide the administrative, education, communication, collection and processing services – at the kerb side and at other facilities – on a daily basis, to more than 75,000 households and businesses. Each week Council staff and contractors service close to 150,000 bins. 

The resource recovery services are still operating as three separate service areas due to the complexity of staffing and contract collection, differing processing / disposal contracts, staff protections as a result of the amalgamations and a Council resolution, in December 2017, to extend staff protections to May 2021.

The IWC generates over $40 million per year in domestic and other waste charges. Funds are allocated to planning, education, communication, collection and disposal/processing on an annual basis and to future capital and plant expenditure over a ten year financial plan.

The purpose of this report is to:

1.   outline the steps to planning for the longer term resource recovery services

2.   plan for the transition to a common sustainable resource recovery service (and domestic waste charge)

3.   outline the service areas that are targetted for redesign in creating a common Inner West resource recovery service.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Note the proposed steps in developing the Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan;

 

2.   Endorse the planned redesign over the next 12 – 18 months, of key resource recovery and waste management services to allow Council to transition to and establish a common Inner West domestic and commercial service;

 

3.   Endorse the use of up to $200,000 from the Domestic Waste Management Reserve to fund the development of the Zero Waste Strategy  and Transition Plan;

 

4.   Note that a report/s on  redesigned services for the following will be presented to Council for consideration in early-mid 2019/2020:

a.   Kerbside domestic food and garden organics and landfill services,

b.   Kerbside domestic recycling services,

c.   Kerbside Household Clean Up including illegal dumping and other kerbside booked collections e.g. metals, white goods, mattresses,

d.   Drop off services including e-waste, problem wastes, the weekend transfer station and Community Recycling Centre/s,

e.   Reuse and Recycling Centre, and

f.    Kerbside commercial services (recycling, organics and landfill);

5.   Further to Council’s previous resolution to immediately commence consideration of the option of the collaboration with industry and universities on recycling micro factories. and in accordance with that resolution Council support the allocation of $10,000 from the domestic waste charge (currently within the resource recovery planning budget), over the next three years to partner with the UNSW on micro-recycling;

 

6.   Consider releasing, at the next quarterly budget review $100,000 of the allocated funds for the Reuse and Recycling Centre from the Domestic Waste Reserve to allow this project to recommence its planning and design.

 

 

BACKGROUND

As part of the development of a common approach to resource recovery and waste management, Inner West Council (IWC) through the Community Strategic Plan has as one of its key objectives, to become:

 

A zero waste community with an active share economy by 2036.

 

Figure 1: IWC definition of Zero Waste

 

Under the IWC Delivery Program and Operational Plan the Resource Recovery Planning and Services teams provide the administrative, education, communication, collection and processing services – at the kerb side and at other facilities – on a daily basis, to more than 75,000 households and businesses. Each week Council staff and contractors service close to 150,000 bins. 

The resource recovery and waste management services are still operating as three separate service areas due to the complexity and differences in staffing and contract collection, processing / disposal contracts, and fees and charges, as well as staff protections as a result of the amalgamations and a Council resolution, in December 2017, to extend staff protections to May 2021.

The IWC generates over $40 million per year in domestic and other waste charges. Funds are allocated to planning, education, communication, collection and disposal/processing on an annual basis and to future capital and plant expenditure over a ten year financial plan.

The purpose of this report is to inform Council about the stages (already underway) to develop a Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan for a common, customer focussed resource recovery service and outline the anticipated results of service redesign for the key domestic and commercial resource recovery and waste management services.

The amalgamation and the objective to become a zero waste community gives IWC an opportunity to redesign its waste services for maximum diversion of material from landfill, to innovate and partner with others in best practice management and to introduce a common customer focussed service to supports community with a zero waste lifestyle.

Ultimate objectives of the Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan are to:

1.       Align the IWC resource recovery planning and services to the Our Inner West 2036 plan and vision of becoming a zero waste community with an active share economy

2.       Establish a common domestic resource recovery and waste management service and charge for IWC

3.       Establish a common commercial waste and recycling service and charge for IWC 

 

Council resolutions on waste management and resource recovery

In addition to the objective to become a zero waste community, IWC has considered reports and Notices of Motion regarding resource recovery and waste management that will be addressed over the development of the Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan.

The resolutions relating to resource recovery and waste management that will be covered by the redesign of key services as part of the Strategy development are outlined in table 1 below.


 

Table 1: summary of Council resolutions relating to resource recovery and waste management

Item

Resolved

Action

C0518 Item 21

Recycling Contract with VISY - former Marrickville area

THAT Council Immediately commence consideration of the option of the collaboration with industry and universities on recycling micro factories.

This matter will be included in the redesign of the Recycling Service and as part of the redesign of the Household Clean Up and Drop-off Services and the development of a Reuse Centre. Staff are working actively with the UNSW on introducing ‘Reform’ to IWC recycling – reform is a new term being used to describe the reforming of recyclable materials into high value materials , a report on this matter will be presented to Council in early 2019/2020.

In order to implement this resolution Council has an opportunity to partner with the UNSW in the UNSW SMaRT Hub for micro-recycling factory for a $10,000 p.a. contribution for three years

C0518 Item 19 Notice of Motion:

Dumping Prevention and Control Policy

THAT Council prepare a report toward a dumping prevention and control policy, including a strategic and evidence-based approach to general and  scheduled pickups, education and communication (especially in areas with high resident turnover), and responding to illegal dumping when it occurs.

These service approaches will be investigated in the redesign of the Household Clean Up and Drop-off Services.

 

A report on these matters will be presented to Council in early 2019/2020.

 

C0718 Item 12 Notice of Motion:

Expand Waste Booking Services

THAT Council provide advice on options for assisting residents without access to vehicles to be able to make use of e-waste and chemical disposal service. This should include an assessment of the most cost effective model and any external organisations can assist with the coordination of the service.

C0818(2) Item 17 Notice of Motion:

Review of Food Organics Waste Management

THAT:
1. Council expedite a review of food organics services and programs, through use of an external contractor engaged by the Environment and Sustainability Unit,
and make recommendations on appropriate services to reduce food organics in landfill and move towards our goal of zero waste;

2. Work with leaders in the organics and waste management field on best practice organics management and divert most organic material from landfill;

3. Council officers contact the producers of the War on Waste TV program to identify whether there are any opportunities for collaboration;

4. Council officers report back following the review with the options for food organics services and funding;

5. Council adopt an objective of leading local governments across the nation in the separation of organic waste from domestic waste taken to landfill; and

6. The review look at ways local schools, business premises community gardens and other interested organisations could establish food organics programs with council support such as the ‘food scrap Friday’ program set up by Camdenville public school.

This will be the subject of the redesign of the kerbside domestic services, specifically greenwaste, landfill and food organics and the redesign of home and community composting programs and services.

 

A report on the future organics and landfill services will be presented to Council in early 2019/2020.

 

Council has also commenced a research partnership with the Institute for Sustainable Futures on organics – ‘Organics Evolution – Planning for 2036 and Beyond’. This project will see for the first time all organic outputs from the IWC area mapped – this will include dog poo, domestic garden and food organics, business organics – fats, oils, greases food and sewer. The map will then provide information about the quantity and location of organics and assist IWC and other key stakeholders (Sydney Water and the EPA) to determine the best immediate, medium and long term management of organics.   

C0818(2) Item 18 Notice of Motion:

Recycling at Inner West Council

THAT:
1. Council note that the three former Councils of the Inner West Council have current contracts for the receipt and processing of recycling with Visy Recycling;

2. Council note that Inner West Council is committed to the continuation of kerbside recycling;

3. Council acknowledge and encourage Inner West residents for their commitment to kerbside recycling which resulted in over 16,000 tons of recycling being diverted from landfill in 2016-17;

4. Officer produce a report into steps that can be taken to increase the quality of material recycled, and further options to help Council maintain a high quality recycling service without burdening Inner West ratepayers; and

5. The report include discussion of Council's capacity to provide recycling services to commercial premises in Marrickville and Leichhardt.

This will be the subject of the redesign of the kerbside domestic recycling and kerbside commercial services.

A report will be presented to Council on this matter in early 2019/2020.

 

IWC is also participating in the NSW Government Taskforce which was set up in response to the China ban on recyclables. Strategic directions from State and Federal Government to stimulate a market for recycled materials is essential and will have significant influence on decisions made by Council in this area.

C0918(1) Item 21 Notice of Motion: Single Use Plastics Reduction

A report on the reduction of single use plastics be incorporated in the next report to Council on Zero Waste in October 2018.

Officers are working to quantify the amount of single use plastics used across Council in directly controlled events, meetings and workplaces. Officers will work within the current procurement policy and events policies and facility managers to put plans in place to eliminate, phase out or significantly reduce single use plastics.

 

 

REPORT

The project to develop the Zero Waste Strategy will be completed in house with support from expert consultants brought in for specific technical areas. The project is divided into four stages:

 

STAGE ONE: Preparation of the Current State – Discussion Paper (complete)

STAGE TWO: Review, research and engagement – review, stakeholder engagement and redesign of IWC services including:

a)   Kerbside domestic food and garden organics and landfill services,

b)   Kerbside domestic recycling services

c)   Kerbside Household Clean Up including illegal dumping and other kerbside booked collections e.g. metals, white goods, mattresses

d)   Drop off services including e-waste, problem wastes, the weekend transfer station and Community Recycling Centre/s,

e)   Reuse and Recycling Centre,

f)    Kerbside commercial services (recycling, organics and landfill)

STAGE THREE: Decision Making – briefings and reports to Council on:

a)   service options and recommended service standards for a common IWC resource recovery service,

b)   changes to current systems

c)   community impact,

d)   impact on Domestic Waste charges and

e)   the draft Transition Plan – timing for roll out of new/changed services and associated policies, fees and charges.   

STAGE FOUR: Public Exhibition and Adoption of the IWC Zero Waste Strategy

This report outlines some of the key information from the Current State - Discussion Paper and highlights the activities planned for Stage 2 – review, research and engagement.

 

Timeframes

The work is planned to be carried out over 2018/2019 and into 2019/2020, see figure 1. It is expected that options for the key services will be ready for Council to consider as part of Stage 3 (Decision Making) in mid-2019.

 

Figure 2: Draft time lines for the Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan

 

STAGE ONE – CURRENT STATE DISCUSSION PAPER

 

This stage is complete. The Discussion Paper is intended for use internally and has brought all the information about the current state of waste management and resource recovery together for the three services areas and for the IWC area as a whole.

 

The information contained in this paper has been used for this report and will be used to brief consultants, community, Councillors and other stakeholders as we move through the project. It identifies the relevant National and State waste policies and strategies and directions adopted by Ashfield, Leichhardt and Marrickville councils.

 

Summary information from the Current State Discussion Paper:

 

What policy environment are we working in?

 

Inner West Council

IWC has a newly adopted Community Strategic Plan that sets the major direction for Council as outlined above. In addition there are two key legacy documents that outline the approach to resource recovery and waste management:

·          Rethink Waste Strategic Plan and Action Plan

·          Leichhardt Environment Strategy and Action Plan.

 

These documents vary in their specific use of targets however are aligned in their interest in reducing materials to landfill through organics management, reuse and empowering the local community to take action and responsibility for materials they generate.


 

NSW Government

The NSW government adopted its Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy in 2014. The targets for NSW are:

·               avoiding and reducing the amount of waste generated per person in NSW

·                increasing recycling rates to

70% for municipal solid waste

70% for commercial and industrial waste

80% for construction and demolition waste

·                increasing waste diverted from landfill to 75%

·                managing problem wastes better, establishing 86 drop-off facilities and services across NSW

·                reducing litter, with 40% fewer items (compared to 2012) by 2017

·                combatting illegal dumping, with 30% fewer incidents (compared to 2011) by 2017

Australian Government

The National Waste Policy was developed in 2009. Since that time little action has been seen from the national level. The most significant work was product stewardship legislation for televisions and computers. Introduced in 2011, it changed the face of e-waste recycling from a linear process, with Council responsible for the materials at the end of their life, to a circular process that sees manufacturers taking product back and designing for recycling. The diversion from landfill for televisions and computers collected at the IWC e-waste drop off is 98%.  

 

The China restriction on contaminated recycling has however promoted action, there is now a draft discussion paper from the Australian Government to inform and update the National Waste Policy, Updating the 2009 National Waste Policy: Less waste, more resources: http://www.environment.gov.au/protection/national-waste-policy/consultation-on-updating-national-waste-policy

 

A submission was made on behalf of local government in NSW by LGNSW and SSROC. IWC contributed to both these submissions with the following points:

·             Circular economy and ensuring language and intentions are well understood by all players

·             Behaviour change and adequately funding and supporting a national education and information campaign

·             Economic instruments / legislation to support product stewardship and extended producer responsibility

·             Coordination across the national, state and local government and industry sectors


 

What materials come from IWC?

 

In 2015/2016 the IWC had an overall diversion from landfill of 36%. Figure 2 below outlines the weight of materials collected by Council and how they were processed or disposed.

Figure 2: baseline year materials by weight and process and what is in the IWC Red Bin

 

What IWC spread of services looks like

 

The domestic and commercial services across the three service areas share many common elements, table 2 however highlights the differences that have evolved over many years.

Table 2: Current services across the three service areas

Service Area

West    (Ashfield)

North (Leichhardt)

South (Marrickville)

Red Bin – Landfill

weekly

weekly

weekly

Yellow Bin – recycling comingled

fortnightly

û

fortnightly

Yellow Bin – recycling containers

û

fortnightly

û

Blue Bin – recycling paper

û

fortnightly

û

Green Bin – Garden Organics

fortnightly

fortnightly;

fortnightly

Green Bin – FOGO

û

û

weekly to 1000 properties per week (trial);

Burgundy Bin - Food Organics

û

weekly 5,200 multi-unit dwellings

û


 

Composting

Compost Revolution

Compost Revolution

Compost Revolution

Compost Collective

Compost Huts trial

Clean up – general household

2 scheduled / year

2 scheduled / year

û

 

4 book-in general household / year

 

weekly book-in

 

û

û

weekly book-in bundled garden organics

 

û

additional general household collections – fee based

additional general household collections >2m3 – fee based

Whitegoods

û

book-in collection

book-in collection

Mattresses

scheduled clean up and booked service

weekend drop-off to Transfer Station – fee based

weekly booked service

E-waste – all IWC

drop off – monthly (Wed) and four Saturdays a year

weekend drop off Community Recycling Centre;

drop off – once/quarter

Problem wastes (6 categories - CRC) all IWC

û

weekend drop off Community Recycling Centre

quarterly Clean  Out

Hazardous Household Chemical Waste (EPA Clean Out) all IWC

û

û

quarterly

Garden Organics drop off

û

weekend drop off – fee based

û

Bin Maintenance

yes

last bin roll out 2017

yes

no large scale bin roll outs

yes

last bin roll out 2014

Lanes / Dumping

reactionary

monthly service and reactionary

3 week cycle;

hot-spot service and reactionary

Commercial services – landfill

weekly 600 businesses – Mon-Fri service

various frequencies – Mon-Fri service - fee per lift invoiced XX

û

Commercial services – recycling

fortnightly 600 businesses – Mon-Fri service

û

û

Misc services - schools, events

included in service - reactionary

fee for service

fee for service

 

Current integration and IWC focussed activity

The following activity is currently underway to assist with integration and the redesign of a common IWC service.

 

Procurement

Tenders for common processing and specific service area processing are complete, underway and or in development for the 2018/2019 year. This work will greatly assist with integration and will give IWC the information it needs to redesign and plan for new services across key areas:

·   Food and Garden Organics Processing (all IWC)

·   Clean Up / Dry Waste Processing (all IWC)

·   Mattresses Processing (all IWC)

·   Recycling (South service area – will align contract dates with other service areas)

·   Landfill (South service area – will align contract dates with other service areas)  

Financial Management

·    Inner West Council - DWMC Audit 2017/2018 – an external review of practice to ensure IWC management of the Domestic Waste funds is in line with the Local Government Act.

·    Inner West Council - DWMC financial model 2018/2019 FY – this financial model allows IWC to input all current and planned costs for the domestic waste service and predict current and future expenditure and associated impacts on the Domestic Waste Charge. 

 

Industrial Relations and Operational Service review

·   Operational Service Review –Council is concurrently undertaking a review of all of its ‘outdoor’ operations including Resource Recovery services. The objectives of the review are to develop a consistent service delivery and operational model across the Inner West and ensure Council’s services are being provided in the most effective and efficient manner possible.

·   Workplace agreement review – harmonisation of workplace agreements being managed by Human Resources will also be integrated with the development of the Strategy

Communications and Engagement

·   Promotion of E-waste recycling across IWC

·   Waste Info App and online service calendar

·   Waste Avoidance, Reuse and Recycling communications

·   Plastic Free July – GLC campaign

·   Home / community composting online education and subsidised compost bins/worm farms

·   Clean Up/Illegal Dumping – Regional Program (SSROC)

·   Clean Up/Illegal Dumping – Waste Inspectors – targeted sites (hot spots)

·   Footprints Eco-Festival

Services Assessment

It is essential that the IWC understands the service standards, costs and immediate opportunities for integration and longer term implications of service changes. Each current service offering is described with the following information:

·    Current processing / disposal contracts

·    Collection model

·    Baseline year data (2015/2016)

·    Tonnes collected (2017/18)

·    % diversion

·    Total cost of service per household (for the former council areas and for the IWC as a whole)

·    Total kg of material generated per person per year 

 

Additional information regarding the services has also been assessed including:

·    Relevant targets

·    Known best practice

·    Barriers to zero waste

·    Community perceptions / willingness for change

·    What is on offer from Industry now / future

·    Gaps in knowledge / information

 

STAGE 2 - REVIEW, RESEARCH AND ENGAGEMENT

 

This stage will involve a significant amount of work on the redesign of a common resource recovery and waste management service.

 

This stage involves the engagement of external consultants and creation of in-house project teams to work on the redesign of the following services:

 

1.       Kerbside domestic food and garden organics and landfill services

2.       Kerbside domestic recycling services

3.       Kerbside Household Clean Up including illegal dumping and other kerbside booked collections e.g. metals, white goods, mattresses

4.       Drop off services including e-waste, problem wastes, the weekend transfer station and Community Recycling Centre/s

5.       Reuse and Recycling Centre

6.       Kerbside commercial services (recycling, organics and landfill)

 

Each service will be reviewed across the three service areas and a number of new service scenarios/options will be developed to assist Council determine the future common IWC service. The following will be used as a guide to each service redesign:

 

1.       Review the existing services on offer across the IWC and identify best practice

2.       Research best practice services in other council areas that could apply to IWC

3.       Prepare a range of scenarios/options for a new resource recovery or waste management service for IWC with each scenario outlining:

a.         degree to which it  addresses the zero waste and diversion from landfill objective and Council resolutions

b.         market readiness including current and or planned facilities and access 

c.         costs – capital and recurrent  and potential impact on the DWMC for each service area and the IWC as a whole

d.         impact on other services on offer by IWC  - collection, frequency 

e.         communications required i.e. how different from current service

f.          recommended timing considering contracts, current or new policy, staffing and industrial issues, plant and asset management

4.       Provide a summary of the analysis for each scenario with a focus on diversion of material from landfill, costs/savings, ease of implementation and other issues specific to each service area

5.       Provide recommendations that will assist IWC prepare the Zero Waste Strategy and Transition Plan for a common resource recovery service.


 

The following table provides an overview of the current state of the services and the areas the redesign will be focusing on:

 

Kerbside domestic food and garden organics and landfill services

Current State

Service Mix

Service Area

West (Ashfield)

North (Leichhardt)

South (Marrickville)

Red Bin – Landfill

weekly

weekly

weekly

Green Bin – Garden Organics

fortnightly

fortnightly

fortnightly

Green Bin – FOGO

û

û

weekly 1000 properties (trial)

Burgundy Bin - Food Organics

û

weekly 5,200 multi-unit dwellings

û

Composting

Compost Revolution

Compost Revolution

Compost Revolution

Compost Collective to > 90 multi-unit dwellings

Compost Huts trial – two huts

The greenwaste service is an opt-in service, currently IWC does not have comprehensive data across the LGA about the number of households that have a green bin. In the South service area for example only 59% of households have a green bin.

The contents of the red bin are disposed to:

·    landfill (South) and

·    landfill via a MBT (mechanical biological treatment) facility at Woodlawn (North and West).

Organic material makes up approximately 37% of the red bin and it is this material IWC would be seeking to collect and process as a valuable re-useable product via an organics service.

IWC is currently tendering for garden organics, FOGO and FOO processing. This will give IWC vital information for the future service in terms of:

1.   whether there are any facilities that can take the organic material from the IWC area, (this has been a barrier in past tender processes with very few if any able to process organic material)

2.   location of tipping organic material,

3.   price per tonne for processing

Challenges

Council has resolved (C0818(2) Item 17) to work with leaders in the field to divert most organic material from landfill. A research project with the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF - UTS) Organics Evolution – Planning to 2036 and Beyond, has commenced. This project will influence the future of organics management in the area over the short medium and longer term.

The challenges for IWC are to design an organics service that is:

·    effective in its diversion of material from landfill

·    is acceptable to the community with respect to frequency of the service, cost, impact on space for bins, its convenience and ease of use  

·    as close as possible to cost neutral – currently organics processing is approximately $100 per tonne more costly than landfill

·    able to be accommodated by processing contracts in the Sydney region, the current greenwaste tender process will identify if there are any facilities willing or able to take the volume of organics, where facilities are and what impacts processing at those facilities will have on current collection methods, costs etc.

Current disposal and processing contracts also present a challenge to achieving a common service across IWC. Current contracts oblige IWC to send the organics material to Woodlawn MBT for the West (Ashfield) area (IWC is free to extract organics from the North (Leichhardt) area). The contract with the Woodlawn facility expires in June 2027.  A decision to change that contract to allow extraction of organic materials may incur penalties – this will be explored as part of the service redesign.

The community recognises the value of organic material and are increasingly demanding that government do better in its management of this material. The current MBT processing at Woodlawn (red bins from North and West service areas) extracts organics however the volume extracted is below expected and the quality of the organics extracted is low. Organics extracted through Woodlawn are currently only suitable for landfill cover or mine site rehabilitation.

At this stage it is unclear whether there are adequate processing facilities in the Sydney basin to accommodate the organics from IWC residents and potentially businesses.

Focus of redesign

IWC has a number of existing organics programs and services:

·    Food Only Organics (FOO) in 5200 units in Leichhardt

·    Food Organics and Garden Organics (FOGO) trial in 1000 households in Marrickville

·    Home composting via Compost Revolution (all IWC)

·    Green waste booked collections and drop off at the weekend Transfer Station – Catherine St. 

·    Home composting – subsidised bins and worm farms and workshops

·    Community composting – Compost Collective for Units and Composting Huts trial in Marrickville

·    Support for community composting in community gardens and schools

The kerbside service will be the major focus of this service redesign and options that will be considered include for example a roll out of FOO to units and FOGO to single houses with a shift in the frequency of collection of the red bin from weekly to fortnightly.

Operationalising composting at home and in the community will be an important element of the IWC service. Composting avoids collection and processing costs and will deliver the most sustainable and lasting impacts if it is adequately resourced.

 

 

Kerbside domestic recycling services

Current State

Service Mix

Service Area

West (Ashfield)

North (Leichhardt)

South (Marrickville)

Yellow Bin – recycling comingled

fortnightly

û

fortnightly

Yellow Bin – recycling containers

û

fortnightly

û

Blue Bin – recycling paper

û

fortnightly

û

A fortnightly comingled (paper and all containers) recycling service is common to the West and South service areas. The recycling service in the North service area has a weekly collection of recycling:

·    week 1 – containers only in the yellow bin

·    week 2 – paper only in the blue bin

Processing is currently contracted to VISY Recycling across all service areas. IWC has recently entered into a 12 month contract for recycling processing for the South service area. VISY has approached IWC to renegotiate the gate rates for the current contracts for North and West service areas. No agreement has been reached. IWC is also pursuing an agreement with VISY on the refund sharing from the NSW Container Deposit Scheme. An agreement for a share of the refunds is in both VISY and Council’s interest and it is anticipated that an agreement will be reached before December 2018. It is yet unknown the value of that agreement.

Challenges

The challenges for IWC are to design a recycling service that:

·    builds on good behaviours and expectations of the IWC community and is therefore effective in its diversion of material from landfill

·    is acceptable to the community with respect to frequency of the service, cost, impact on space for bins, its convenience and ease of use  

·    builds trust in the community that all materials collected will be recycled

·    demonstrates the best value for money and innovation in recycling and Council’s and communities role in contributing to the circular economy

The recycling industry has been significantly affected by the change in policy from China in the import restrictions of recyclables. This has highlighted the lack of planning and policy at the National and State level for a robust and resilient recycling industry / circular economy for Australia.

Immediate impacts for IWC are the increase to processing fees for our current contracts. IWC has negotiated a new 12 month contract for the processing of recycling from the South (Marrickville) service area at an increased rate per tonne, an increase of $138,000 per year. 

Council is still in negotiation around the contract for the West (Ashfield) and North (Leichhardt) service areas with respect to rates per tonne for processing. There is a significant financial impact on these two contracts as both were attracting a rebate for part of the recycling processing – cost increases for recycling of between $500,000 - $800,000 a year are being sought, Council is challenging the proposed increases. These contracts are current and expire in 2020 with an option (at Council’s discretion) to extend to 2023.

The change in global movement and trade in recycling will see future contracts seeking to share the risk between the recyclers and councils. Council is anticipating that new generation contracts will need to be more innovative and be more focussed on partnerships however significant leadership from the State and Federal governments is crucial if this is to be successful. The financial implications (costs and benefits) of risk sharing contracts are unknown.

Focus of the redesign

The redesign of the recycling service will need to assess the diversion, costs and benefits of a separated service (paper and containers) versus a comingled service or combinations of the two.

Industry has indicated that with cleaner, source separated streams of material comes greater diversion and recycling, and less stockpiling of unrecyclable materials.

The efforts of State and National governments and innovators such as UNSW Smart labs, are crucial in this space.

IWC is participating in the National Taskforce (hosted by the EPA) into recycling. IWC therefore has a seat at the table with government and industry however we are operating in a vacuum with a significant lack of policy direction and legislative support at the State and Federal level.

 

Kerbside Household Clean Up

Including illegal dumping and other booked collections e.g. metals, white goods, mattresses

Current State

Service Mix

Service Area

West (Ashfield)

North (Leichhardt)

South (Marrickville)

Clean up – general household

2 scheduled / year

2 scheduled / year

û

 

4 book-in general household / year

 

weekly book-in

 

û

û

weekly book-in bundled garden organics

 

û

additional general household collections – fee based

additional general household collections >2m3 – fee based

Whitegoods

û

book-in collection

book-in collection

Mattresses

scheduled clean up and booked service

weekend drop-off to Transfer Station – fee based

weekly booked service

The major differences in the services for kerbside Clean Up are:

·    booked (South and West) clean up

·    scheduled (North and West) whole-of-community clean up

The majority of materials put out in the Clean Up are disposed to landfill. Some recovery (between 10 – 25%) is reported by the supplier however materials are collected in the back of a compactor so reuse and recovery of good quality items is not possible.

Illegal dumping in the South service area has a hot spot run for known dumping sites with a separate crew and truck dedicated to collection of dumped materials. 

In the North and West service areas dumping had been managed and investigated differently and materials only collected following an inspection. IWC has recently introduced two new Waste Inspector positions, there are now four staff focusing on illegal dumping and compliance with local education, information and where needed enforcement they work across all of the service areas. 

Challenges

The challenges for IWC are to design a service for household materials that sees:

·    individuals encouraged to change purchasing and disposal behaviours e.g. using the share economy (libraries and cooperatives)

·    a shift to a drop-off culture rather than a collection culture (more resources from Council spent on reuse and recycling rather than collection) 

·    Council seeking and responding to industry changes e.g. in the design and manufacturing processes so that materials are recyclable and more durable – circular economy, product stewardship

·    Council providing a service that is acceptable to the community with respect to access to the service (there may be a perception that a shift from the 52 booked services per year will be seen as a service reduction in the South service area),

·    As close as possible to cost neutral service that is easy to use

·    Council develop a service that is equitable, and provides a mix of services at both the kerbside and at designated reuse/recycling facilities


 

Focus of the redesign

The redesign of the Clean Up service will assess the diversion, costs and benefits of booked versus a scheduled clean up or combinations of the two.

At this stage research suggests that a booked service is preferred over a scheduled model. A booked service allows Council to plan the collections by zone, manage costs and manage the volume of material sent for disposal. It also allows IWC to become more innovative and proactive in managing reusable items and using the Waste Inspectors programs to better distinguish between illegal dumps and booked Clean Up items.  

Work on the redesign of the Clean Up will be done in conjunction with the following:

·    E-waste drop-off

·    Problem Wastes drop-off

·    Community Recycling Centres and Catherine St weekend Transfer Station and

·    The Reuse and Recycling Centre.

Partnering with others, community, businesses and not-for-profits in delivery of these services will be crucial.

It is anticipated that a future policy on the household clean up will seek a ban on materials that have recycling services in place e.g. e-waste, greenwaste. This will be explored as part of the project.

Services to assist residents without access to a vehicle will also form part of this work. 

 

Drop off services

Including e-waste, problem wastes, weekend t’fer station and Community Recycling Centre/s

Current State

Service Mix

Service Area

West (Ashfield)

North (Leichhardt)

South (Marrickville)

E-waste – all IWC

drop off – monthly (Wed) and four Saturdays a year

weekend drop-off Community Recycling Centre

drop-off – once/quarter

Problem wastes (6 categories - CRC) all IWC

û

weekend drop-off Community Recycling Centre 

quarterly Clean  Out

Hazardous Household Chemical Waste (EPA Clean Out) all IWC

û

û

quarterly

Garden Organics drop off

û

weekend drop-off – fee based

û

E-waste events and problem waste chemical Clean Out events have also been managed differently at each council. All E-waste and Chemical Clean Out events, the Community Recycling Centre and the Transfer Station have been open and available to all IWC residents since soon after amalgamation.

E-waste covers all electronic waste, however only televisions and computers are covered under the Product Stewardship Act 2011. Other e-waste is recycled at Council’s cost.

Problem waste Chemical Clean Outs are funded by the EPA. Chemical Clean Outs are offered four times a year at the St Peters depot – two events funded by the EPA and two at Council’s cost.

99.6% of the e-waste collected at our events is recycled.  

 

11,000 vehicles dropped off e-waste last year at IWC’s drop off facilities - St Peters, and Summer Hill depots and Leichhardt Community Recycling Centre. These are great examples of how successful a drop-off facility can be for diversion of materials from landfill.

Challenges

These services are very linked to the Clean Up services and are being managed together in the redesign project. The greatest challenge for this area is being able to provide adequate facilities (physical space and land) for the community to easily drop-off items for recycling.

A second CRC is being planned for the St Peters Depot – this will take problem wastes and is part funded by the EPA, it is anticipated that the CRC will be open by December 2018. Staffing needs and opening hours will be addressed as part of the service. 

Focus of the redesign

The focus of this service redesign is in:

·    aligning the operations of the drop-off facilities to assist in growing the drop-off culture

·    shifting Council resources from collection focussed mostly on disposal and some recycling to facilities and collection focussed on reuse and recycling and as a last resort disposal

·    clearly communicating to the community about the service and what goes where

·    investigating support for residents without transport

 

Reuse and Recycling Centre

Current State

IWC currently has an allocation of funds (in the Domestic Waste Reserve) for the development of a Reuse and Recycling Centre at Tempe Lands, Swamp Rd, Tempe. The intention is for a centre that would facilitate a shift from the current collection culture to a drop-off culture and where more materials from the household clean up can be reused, repaired, repurposed or recycled rather than being crushed in the compactors and sent to landfill. 

The objectives were for a centre that: 

1.    Increases reuse and recycling and reduces the materials sent to landfill coming from households, businesses and construction sites

2.    Is socially, economically and environmentally sustainable and is loved by the community

3.    Enables local employment and social enterprise and is well connected to the local economy

4.    Supports creative industries

5.    Is developed through and run in partnership and participation with not-for profits

6.    Provides opportunities for community participation

7.    Is organised, contemporary and adaptable for growth

8.    Provides access to permanent drop-off / reuse / recycling facilities 

9.    Encourages the culture of “drop off” rather than kerbside collection

10.  Eliminates presence of problem wastes from landfill

11.  Offers life-long learning

12.  Looks to innovative solutions e.g. trial new systems and technologies

 

The project has developed concept designs for the site and a ten year operations plan that phases in services as Council and the community increases their understanding of the reuse space. There is a link between this proposal and the introduction of innovations in micro-recycling. These are currently being explored with the University of NSW. 


 

Challenges

Challenges associated with this project were with the amalgamation of councils and the resulting loss of momentum for the project. The impacts of Westconnex are also present with the Tempe site. The project can be reignited with direction from Council and release of funds from the Domestic Waste Reserve, $500,000 was allocated for the detailed design and $1M for the construction of the centre.

Following amalgamation it was clear that the Tempe site was not the best location given it is location on the periphery of the IWC area. Other sites in the LGA would be more suitable to encourage maximum accessibility. The site on Swamp Rd is also restricted due to the proximity of the flight path. Council cannot, for example, combine a drop off site for problem wastes in this location. Ideally a reuse centre would have the capacity for a one-stop shop for reuse and recycling. A review of property and lands available across IWC may result in a new location being found for a reuse centre.

Release of $100,000 into this years budget would allow Council to:

·    confirm a preferred site

·    review the previous operations planning and concept designs,

·    integrate the Reuse Recycling Centre into service redesign for Clean Up and drop off facilities

 

Kerbside commercial services (recycling, organics and landfill)

Current State

Service Mix

Service Area

West

(Ashfield)

North

(Leichhardt)

South (Marrickville)

Commercial services – landfill

weekly 600 businesses – Mon-Fri service

various frequencies – Mon-Fri service - fee per lift invoiced

û

Commercial services – recycling

fortnightly 600 businesses – Mon-Fri service

û

û

At present IWC offers two different commercial services. A general waste service in both North and West service area and a recycling service in West service area.

The services are administered differently. In the West service area landowners are charged for the waste and recycling services as part of the annual rates (much like the domestic waste charge), the waste and recycling is included in the collection contract. In the North service area businesses are charged directly for each bin lift. IWC staff operate this as an in-house service. There are no commercial services offered in the South service area.

Challenges

The biggest challenge with this service is getting a common administrative approach to the charging and service delivery. Council is currently working with the property owners and businesses in the West service area to shift from a rates-based fee to a fee for each business for each bin lift. This new approach will commence on 1 July 2019 and businesses will have more than six months to decide whether they wish to continue with a Council delivered service and the frequency of the service they need.  

Focus of the redesign

Getting a common approach to the administration of the commercial service for the current services in the West and North service areas is the initial focus. Following this Council will seek interest from businesses across IWC for a full waste and recycling service. Once Council has an idea of the interest a service can be designed. This element will not commence until early-mid 2019.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Zero Waste Strategy

The Zero Waste Strategy will guide the establishment of a common IWC resource recovery and waste management service/s. The strategy will include a review of every service and associated costs such as plant replacement and consistent bin stock across the IWC area as we transition to a common harmonised service. The financial outcome of the Zero Waste Strategy will see a harmonised Domestic Waste Management Charge and strategic management of the Domestic Waste Management Reserve. The project to develop a Zero Waste Strategy will be largely completed in house. Some funding is already allocated in the current budget for consultants and external support for the service redesign of Clean Up and associated services. This funding will cover the initial consultants fees for the Organics and Recycling service redesign.

However it is estimated that $200,000 will be required, to be drawn from the Domestic Waste Reserve, to support the stages two, three and four of the project and to fast track external and internal reviews, engagement of stakeholders, community and Councillors and to complete project documentation, graphic design and final Strategy development.  There are currently unallocated funds in the Domestic Waste Reserve to fund this initiative.

Reuse and Recycling Centre

Funding is also needed to continue work on the Reuse and Recycling Centre. An allocation of $500,000 was made by Marrickville Council for the detailed design of a Reuse and Recycling Centre at Tempe. To continue with this project, funds of $100,000 will need to be released from the Domestic Waste Reserve as a budget adjustment to allow for a review of the planning and design work done to date and to recommence the project. In line with the Council resolution to immediately commence consideration of the option of the collaboration with industry and universities on recycling micro factories. Council has the opportunity to partner with the UNSW on micro-recycling. To take advantage of this opportunity Council has been invited to make a financial contribution to the UNSW SMaRT Hub with an allocation of $10,000 over the next three years. There is funding available in the recurrent budget in Resource Recovery Planning to cover this. 

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

An internal Project Control Group (PCG) has been established for this project with members focussed on Environment and Sustainability, Finance and Customer Service.  The PCG has been involved in the project planning and risk assessment phases and will meet on a regular basis throughout the project. There will be considerable engagement with staff around this project.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

A communications and engagement plan is currently being developed for the project. Engagement with the Environment Strategic Reference Group, as part of the development of the Community Strategic Plan was carried out in 2017.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 9

Subject:         2018/19 Inner West Council Grants Program           

Prepared By:     Tess Newton-Palmer - Community Resourcing and Research Supervisor, 

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

This report proposes projects for funding by Council approval from the Inner West Council 2018-19 Grant Program. Council’s Grant Program comprises five different grant streams and the recommended projects address Council’s vision and priorities and individual grant program guidelines. In total, $362,225 has been recommended to support 91 projects in the Inner West community.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council approve the funding recommendations for the Inner West Council Grant Program 2018-19 contained in Attachments 1-5

 

 

BACKGROUND

The Inner West Council Grants Program provides assistance to groups and individuals to enable them to deliver programs and services that address identified needs and improve community wellbeing. The grants enable Council to support the diverse range of community and volunteer groups in the Inner West to achieve shared objectives. The following five grant programs are offered:

 

·    Arts and Culture grants (Living Arts and Independent Artist grants): grants of up to $7,500 available to not-for-profit organisations, social and creative enterprises, and individual artists. The grants support projects and initiatives that provide opportunities for creative participation and the celebration of local stories; enhance creativity and connection to place in the public sphere; develop skills; and strengthen the sustainability and capacity of Inner West cultural and creative industries.

·    Community History and Heritage grants: grants of up to $7,500 available to support and enrich Council’s local history collection, with a focus on organisations or persons to undertake projects about people, events and places of historical significance to the Inner West area. Projects may include research; collections; archiving; conservation; publications; and exhibitions about the Inner West’s social and cultural history.

·    Community Wellbeing grants: grants of up to $7,500 available to not-for-profit community based organisations or community groups auspiced by an organisation for sustainable local projects which address local issues; promote social justice; enhance wellbeing; strengthen the sustainability and capacity of the Inner West community and foster inclusion and social connection.


 

·    Environment grants: grants of up to $7,500 available to support groups that benefit the environment and community through projects focused on environmental improvement; sustainability education; awareness-raising; and the promotion of sustainable living as a way of life. Grants support projects that address issues such as climate change; sustainable transport; water sensitive urban design; biodiversity; recycling and reuse.

·    Recreation grants: grants of up to $7,500 available to community sporting and recreation groups and non-government community recreation organisations offering recreation programs and services to residents in the Inner West area. The grants support projects that address barriers to participation; create positive and meaningful involvement in neighbourhoods and communities; ensure inclusive and best practice access to recreation so  that all members of the Inner West community can enjoy activities that appeal to their interest and form closer connections.

 

Delivery of the 2018-19 Grants Program

The 2018 Grants Program round opened on 7 June and closed on 16 July 2018. To support prospective applicants during this period, Council officers hosted four information sessions at Ashfield Civic Centre and Petersham Service Centre. The information sessions included an initial presentation on the Grant Program, followed by a series of one-on-one discussions between Council staff and applicants to provide tailored advice and support. 160 prospective grant applicants attended these sessions.

 

Council officers advised and coached individuals and groups to clarify their ideas and develop their applications. This included a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities in response to an identified lack of representation of these groups in the 2017 Grants Program.

 

The Grant Program was publicised via the Multicultural NSW email broadcast service (8,000 recipients). Grant information was also translated into the top six community languages for targeted advertising in community press.

 

External Panel Representative

As required by Notion of Motion C0318 Item 8, each Inner West Grant Program assessment panel include an external representative and each of the five grant streams engaged an external representative as a member.

 

The Assessment Process

In the 2018 Grants Round, all applications underwent a three-stage assessment process before final funding recommendations were formulated.

 

Firstly, all applications are screened through an eligibility check conducted by grant administrators of the five rounds. This included an organisations status, previous grant compliance and completeness of applications.

 

Secondly, eligible applications were assessed and ranked against the evaluation criteria by Council staff with subject matter expertise. A score against each of the evaluation criteria is tallied to arrive at a total score for each application.

Based on this total score, staff assessors rank each application from high to low priority. Staff assessment sheets for each grant round are then reviewed by the appropriate senior staff of each unit to ensure accuracy and completeness.

 

Thirdly, for each of the five rounds, an assessment panel comprised of managers, executives and a community representative reviewed all the applications and the assessments. This panel then confirmed or fine-tuned scores and rankings, and developed funding recommendations.

 

In this third step, the assessment panel reviewed the project proposals, evaluations (total score and priority ranking), amount requested, target audience, previous funding including from Stronger Communities and previous Council grant rounds, the intersecting issue of any Council venue fee waivers, and whether the project could proceed with partial funding.

 

The Panel recommends funding based on highest to lowest scores until the total funding pool is exhausted. Due to the high volume of applications, only those projects receiving the highest scores are recommended for full funding. For the mid scoring projects that can proceed with partial funding, the panel then recommends funding based on a consistent percentage across the board. Those projects not recommended for funding are those where the applicants confirm they cannot proceed with partial funding, or do not meet the grant objectives and/or eligibility criteria.

 

Staff from across Council participated in assessing a total of 160 applications. Staff from the following Council teams participated: Community History and Heritage Community Wellbeing, Community Operations, Living Arts, Parks Planning and Engagement, Planning and Programs, Recreation, Resource Recovery Planning, Social and Cultural Planning, Urban Ecology and Urban Sustainability.

 

Funding Recommendations

 

Recommendations for the five grant panels’ funding allocations are proposed in Attachments 1-5. In many cases, the amount recommended for specific projects is less than the amount requested. This reflects a policy to support as many worthwhile projects as possible within the limited budget available. In addition, some applications budgeted for items that are ineligible under the guidelines for the particular grant, resulting in these amounts being removed or reduced from the grant funding recommended.


 

Summary of the 2018-19 Inner West Council Grant Program

 

Grant

Program

Business Unit

Available Budget

Applications

Assessed

Applications

Recommended

Amount

Requested

Amount

Recommended

Arts and Culture: Independent Artists

Community Services and Culture

Combined Arts & Culture

Budget

$150,000

27

12

$158,968

$44,800

Arts and Culture: Living Arts

Community Services and Culture

34

25

$208,772

$102,500

Community History & Heritage

Library and History Services

$25,000

15

6

$90,400

$25,000

Community

Wellbeing

Community Services and Culture

$113,700

53

29

$315,961

$113,647

Environment

Environment and Sustainability

$43,000

13

8

$84,360

$42,449

Recreation

Aquatic and Recreation

$33,829

18

11

$110,805

$33,829

Total

 

$365,529

160

91

$969,266

$362,225

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Nil. Grants recommended can be funded from within existing budget allocations.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Nil.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Nil.

 

CONCLUSION

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

2018-19 Arts and Culture Grants (Independent Artists and Living Arts)

2.

2018-19 Community History and Heritage Grants

3.

2018-19 Community Wellbeing Grants

4.

2018-19 Environment Grants

5.

2018-19 Recreation Grants

  


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

30 October 2018

 

Item No:         C1018(2) Item 10

Subject:         Planning Proposal Assessment Report - 1-5 Chester Street, Annandale           

Prepared By:     Gunika Singh - Strategic Planner 

Authorised By:  David Birds - Group Manager Strategic Planning

 

SUMMARY

Council received a Planning Proposal from ae design partnership on 2 February 2018 for 1 - 5 Chester Street, Annandale, requesting an amendment to the Leichhardt Local Environmental Plan (LLEP) 2013. The Proposal seeks to rezone the site from Light Industrial (IN2) to Medium Density Residential (R3), increase the floor space ratio to 2.6:1 and introduce a new height control of 17m. This would enable a six storey residential flat building development with approximately 44 apartment units. A site-specific development control plan is also proposed as part of the application. The site is located in the Camperdown Precinct of the Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy (PRCUTS), but is not earmarked for redevelopment until after 2023.

 

This report recommends that Council should not refer the Proposal to the NSW Department of Planning and Environment for Gateway Determination in accordance with s3.33 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act).

 

The report was presented to the Inner West Planning Panel for advice on 11 September 2018. This referral is required under the new s2.19 of the Act. The Panel supported the Council officer's conclusions not to support the subject Planning Proposal. The Panel's advice has been taken into consideration when making a recommendation to Council in this report.

 

A Strategic Merit assessment has been carried out against the Department of Planning and Environment's "A Guide to preparing Planning Proposals". The Planning Proposal fails to meet the requirements of this strategic merit test. It is also inconsistent with the key objectives of Greater Sydney Region Plan 2018, Eastern City District Plan 2018 and the recommendations of PRCUTS.

 

This Planning Proposal application has been submitted at a critical time in strategic and infrastructure planning for the broader Inner West Council area and the Parramatta Road Corridor. There are several relevant strategic planning projects currently underway at local and State level, most notably the new Inner West Local Environmental Plan (LEP) and Development Control Plan (DCP), Local Housing Strategy, Local Infrastructure Contributions Plan and the Camperdown Ultimo Collaboration Area Place Strategy.

 

These broad-scale strategic planning projects are the best means of reviewing the planning controls for the subject site and other sites in urban renewal areas such as Parramatta Road and the Sydenham to Bankstown Corridor particularly where ad hoc private planning proposals would undermine systematic forward planning. This is an additional reason that the Planning Proposal should not be supported.

 

For the same reason, this report also recommends that Council should take a policy position to decline to accept new private planning proposals in the urban renewal areas of Parramatta Road and Sydenham to Bankstown Corridor until the new Inner West LEP, DCP and Contributions Plan are completed. This recommendation is reinforced with another recommendation that the Minister for Planning be requested to suspend rezoning review requests in these corridors for the same period.

 

If the Minister for Planning does not accept this request and Council as Planning Proposal Authority does not accept such private planning proposals, it would have to address potential rezoning reviews by submissions to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.   Council does not support the Planning Proposal for the reasons outlined in the report including that:

a)   It fails the Strategic Merit Test of "A guide to preparing planning proposals" as it is inconsistent with key objectives and priorities of the Greater Sydney Region Plan 2018; Eastern City District Plan 2018; and Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy (PRCUTS) 2016.

Specifically, the Planning Proposal is inconsistent with the following elements of PRCUTS:

i.    Policy context and the Strategy's vision for the Corridor and especially for the Camperdown precinct which is for residential development including affordable, student and key workers accommodation to support biotechnology and employment uses;

ii.   Implementation Tool Kit including the Implementation Plan 2016-2023, Planning and Design Guidelines, Infrastructure Schedule and Urban Amenity Improvement Plan;

iii.  Reference Reports including the Precinct Transport Report, Fine Grain Study and Sustainability Implementation Plan;

iv.  Exceeds the Planning and Design Guidelines recommended density by 73.3% without satisfactorily demonstrating that the proposal would achieve better built form outcomes or design excellence; and

v.   Does not meet the requirements of the Parramatta Road Implementation Plan 2016 - 2023 'Out of Sequence Checklist'  criteria.

b)   It is inconsistent with the Ministerial Directions issued under Section 9.1 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 including Directions No. 1.1 - Business and Industrial Zones, 7.1 - Implementation of A Plan for Growing Sydney and 7.3 - Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy;

c)   It is inconsistent with the Inner West Council Community Strategic Plan 2018;

d)   It is inconsistent with Leichhardt Employment and Economic Development Plan 2013 - 2023, Leichhardt Employment Lands Study 2014 and Leichhardt Industrial Precinct Planning Report 2016 and would result in loss of employment and urban services land;

e)   It is premature in the light of the prospective outcomes of strategic planning studies and projects underway at State and Local Government levels;

f)    It does not demonstrate that it will make an adequate contribution towards the provision of affordable housing which is inconsistent with the objectives of the Greater Sydney Region Plan 2018, Eastern City District Plan 2018 and Council's Affordable Housing Policy; and

g)  Support of this Planning Proposal would result in a premature and adverse development precedent in the Camperdown Precinct and for other sites in the Parramatta Road Corridor Strategy area.

2.         Should the proponent request a Rezoning Review by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment, delegation is given to the Group Manager of Strategic Planning to lodge a submission to the review process in accordance with this report and Council's related resolution.

4.         Council prioritise preparation of a Masterplan for the Camperdown Precinct in collaboration with health and education stakeholders to support the development of innovative and incubator biotechnology activities in the area.

5.         Council resolves as the planning proposal authority for the Inner West LGA to not accept any new private planning proposals in the urban renewal areas of Parramatta Road Corridor and Sydenham to Bankstown Corridor until the completion of the Inner West LEP, DCP and Infrastructure Contributions Plan.

6.         Council write to the Minister for Planning to request a similar arrangement to that provided for the City of Ryde Council whereby the rezoning review process is suspended for planning proposals in the Parramatta Road and Sydenham to Bankstown Corridors from 30 October 2018 to 1 November 2020.

 

 

 

1.0       OVERVIEW OF PROPOSAL

The Planning Proposal (Attachment 3) submitted to Council by ae design partnership seeks to amend LLEP 2013 to establish R3 Medium Density Residential controls to facilitate redevelopment of 1 - 5 Chester Street, Annandale. The Planning Proposal is accompanied by a proposed amendment to Leichhardt Development Control Plan (LDCP) 2013 (Attachment 6) which also includes site specific controls for the property.

The key components are:

·    Rezoning the subject site from Light Industrial (IN2) to Medium Density Residential (R3).

·    An uplift in Floor Space Ratio (FSR) from 1:1 to 2.6:1.

·    Introduction of a new height control of 17m for the site resulting in a 5 storey building facing Chester Street and a 6 storey building facing Johnstons Creek.

 

2.0       APPLICATION HISTORY

·    D/2002/292 - Development Application - Ancillary sale of motor vehicles from motor vehicle repair shop - Approved on 10 August 2002.

·    Pre-Planning Proposal - Lodged on 24 July 2017 - Rezone the site from IN2 Light Industrial to R3 Medium Density Residential with a maximum Floor Space Ratio of 2.4:1 and a maximum building height of 17m - Advice provided on 26 October 2017.

·    Planning Proposal (Current application) -  Lodged on 2 February 2018 - Rezone the site from IN2 Light Industrial to R3 Medium Density Residential with a maximum Floor Space Ratio of 2.6:1 and a maximum building height of 17m - Reported to the Inner West Planning Panel on 11 September 2018.

 

3.0       SITE AND SURROUNDING CONTEXT

The site is a triangular shaped 1,307 sqm lot in the Camperdown precinct of LDCP (Figure 1). The site is located at the end of the Chester Street cul-de-sac, approximately 300m from Parramatta Road and 3.5 km from the Sydney CBD (Figure 2).

The site has a 44m frontage to Chester Street and 55m frontage to Johnstons Creek. The site slopes down by approximately 1m from the southern boundary to the northern and eastern boundaries.

 

Figure 1- Location of site (shown in blue) in the context of Camperdown precinct (shown in red).

 

Figure 2  Aerial view of the site (shown in red) looking towards the CBD.

Subject site

Figure 3 - Extract from the zoning map of LLEP 2013. Subject site shown in red.

The site currently accommodates a part one and part two storey industrial building, which provides car repair services (Figure 4). The northern boundary of the site adjoins Johnstons Creek. There are one and two storey single residential terrace dwellings to the north and east of the site and two or three storey industrial warehouse buildings to the south and west.

Figure 4 - Existing warehouse when viewed from Chester Street.

Subject site

Figure 5 - Subject site when viewed from Douglas Grant Memorial Park.

Figure 6 - Surrounding residential buildings to the north of Johnstons Creek.

Figure 7 - Kennards Storage Warehouse at 1 - 19 Booth Street opposite the subject site

The site is in an IN2 Light Industrial zone under LLEP 2013 which states the following objectives for the zone:

 

·    To provide a wide range of light industrial, warehouse and related land uses.

·    To encourage employment opportunities and to support the viability of centres.

·    To minimise any adverse effect of industry on other land uses.

·    To enable other land uses that provide facilities or services to meet the day to day needs of workers in the area.

·    To support and protect industrial land for industrial uses.

·    To retain existing employment uses and foster a range of new industrial uses to meet the needs of the community.

·    To ensure the provision of appropriate infrastructure that supports Leichhardt’s employment opportunities.

·    To retain and encourage waterfront industrial and maritime activities.

·    To provide for certain business and office premises and light industries in the arts, technology, production and design sectors.

 

The site has a maximum permissible FSR of 1:1 and no height control in the LLEP 2013. The public reserve to the north of the site is zoned RE1 Public Recreation. The application proposes to rezone the site to R3 Medium Density Residential, increase the FSR of the site to 2.6:1 and introduce a height control of 17m.

 

The site is a Flood Planning Area and has a 100 year Flood Planning Level plus 500mm freeboard requirement, which indicates that the minimum freeboard floor level of the development including units/ dwellings should be a minimum of RL5.45.

 

The basement carpark needs to be protected up to the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) level which is RL8.40. There is no minimum RL for the basement; however any part of the basement below the flood level will have to be flood proofed up to the PMF level.

 

The site does not contain heritage items and is not within any conservation area but is adjacent to the Draft Annandale Conservation Area extension.

3.0       BACKGROUND

The site is in the Camperdown precinct of Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy (PRCUTS) which is a State Government endorsed strategy for the revitalisation of Parramatta Road corridor given statutory force via a Section 9.1 Ministerial Direction in November 2016 (Figure 8).

PRCUTS is a plan to drive and inform land use planning and development decisions as well as long term infrastructure delivery programs in the Parramatta Road Corridor. The Strategy is supported by an Implementation Tool Kit and comprises the following documents:

·    Parramatta Road Urban Transformation Strategy

·    Implementation Tool Kit:

Ø Implementation Plan 2016 - 2023

Ø Planning and Design Guidelines

Ø Infrastructure Schedule

Ø Urban Amenity Improvement Plan

Delivery of the Strategy relies on the implementation of the principles in PRCUTS and will occur over 30 years in the following indicative timeframes:

·    Short term - 2016 - 2023

·    Medium term - 2023 - 2036

·    Long term - 2036 - 2050

 

The site is outside the PRCUTS '2016 - 2023 Release Area' which means that the redevelopment of the site should ideally be in the medium to long term between 2024 and 2054.

The Strategy will be implemented through:

·    State Environmental Planning Policies  for priority precincts (in the corridor to the west of the IWC local government area)

·    Planning proposals prepared by landowners or developers

·    Comprehensive LEP reviews undertaken by councils

Figure 8 - Structure of Parramatta Road Strategy Documents.

The key targets in the Strategy for the Camperdown area are:

 

·    1,400 new people by 2050

·    700 new homes by 2050

·    2,300 new jobs by 2050

 

Figure 9 illustrates the broad PRCUTS land use policy directions for the Precinct.

Figure 9 - Structure plan for the redevelopment of Camperdown precinct

PRCUTS sets out key actions associated with land uses; transport and movement; place-making; and open space, linkages and connections; and makes recommendations for future zoning, height and density controls to ensure a place-based approach for future development of the Corridor. Key actions related to the subject site and Camperdown precinct are considered in more detail later in this report.

 

The PRCUTS Implementation Plan 2016 - 2023 provides a methodological and sequential approach for growth and the alignment of infrastructure provision with that growth. As noted earlier, the site is outside the PRCUTS '2016 - 2023 Release Area' which means that the redevelopment of the site should ideally be in the medium to long term between 2024 and 2054. (Refer to the Figure 10 below).

 

 

Figure 10 - Extract from the PRCUTS Implementation Plan - Camperdown Action Plan 2016 - 2023. Subject site out of the 2016 - 2023 release area shown in blue.

Proposals that depart from this staging need to be assessed on their merit against the PRCUTS 'Out of Sequence Checklist' criteria to ensure that changes to the land use zones and development controls are timely and can be justified against the Principles and Strategic Actions of the Strategy.

 

PRCUTS recommendations and requirements have been taken into consideration in the assessment of this Planning Proposal.

 

4.0       THE PLANNING PROPOSAL

The Planning Proposal seeks to amend the provisions of LLEP 2013 for land use, FSR and height of building as they apply to the site. The application is supported by information as follows:

 

·    Urban Design Report by ae design partnership for a residential building of part 5 part 6 storeys and one level of basement;

·    Site-specific LDCP 2013 amendment;

·    Letter(s) of offer - Local and State contributions by ae design partnership;

·    Traffic and Transport Assessment  by Varga Traffic Planning;

·    Economic Impact Assessment by AECOM;

·    Environmental Assessment Report and Remedial Action Plan by Covas Pty Ltd;

·    Heritage Impact Assessment by Architectural Projects Pty Ltd;

·    Social Impact and Housing Affordability Assessment Report by Cred Consulting;

·    Flooding and Stormwater Management Planning Report by Sparks and Partners;

·    Acoustic Assessment by Corvas Pty Ltd;

·    PRCUTS Out of Sequence documents:

Ø Design Excellence Statement by ae design partnership and DKO Architecture;

Ø Stakeholder Engagement Report by Ethos Urban; and

Ø Integrated Infrastructure Delivery Plan by Northrop.

 

The application primarily relies on the land use and development controls recommended in the PRCUTS including zoning and height recommendations to justify the Planning Proposal. The Proposal heavily relies on the recommended height control (17m) in PRCUTS to justify the increased FSR of 2.6:1 which would breach the recommended PRCUTS FSR of 1.5:1. The proposal would result in a part 5/ part 6 storey development with 42 units and one level of basement car parking.

 

The following table provides a comparative analysis of the site's current controls, PRCUTS recommended controls and the proponent's proposed controls:

 

Criteria

Current LEP controls

PRCUTS recommendations

Proposed Controls

Zoning

IN2 Light Industrial

R3 Medium Density Residential - Focus residential development on student, key worker and affordable housing.

 

R3 Medium Density Residential - Market Housing.

 

FSR

1:1

1.5:1

2.6:1

 

Height

No control

17m (or 4 storeys)

17m (or 6 storeys)

 

Table 1 - Comparison of the site's existing, recommended (PRCUTS) and proposed controls.

5.0       ASSESSMENT OF THE PLANNING PROPOSAL

The Planning Proposal application including the supporting documentation has been assessed with consideration given to current planning strategies and controls at State and local level, strategic planning projects currently underway and the Department of Planning's A Guide to Preparing Planning Proposals.

Overall, it is considered that the Planning Proposal provides adequate documentation for Council to determine whether the Planning Proposal has merit to proceed to the Gateway Stage. However, there are key issues with the Planning Proposal as discussed further in this report which indicate that the Planning Proposal should not be supported in its current form. A detailed assessment of the Planning Proposal is also provided in the Planning Proposal assessment checklist attached to this report (Attachment 1).

 

Without prejudicing the final conclusion of this assessment, the detailed level of information provided by ae design for the proposed medium density residential development is thorough and comprehensive. However, the proposal does not adequately pass the overall strategic test and should not be supported in its current form. The following discussion highlights the key issues.

 

The tabulated analysis below assesses the adequacy of the supporting information supplied with the Planning Proposal and whether it meets the aims and objectives of the strategic framework in DPE's 'Guide to preparing planning proposals.'

 

Part 1 Objectives and intended outcomes

 

 

 

Guideline Requirements

2.1

Requires a concise statement setting out the objective or intended outcomes of the planning proposal.

 

The proponent's stated objectives or intended outcomes are unsatisfactory because:

 

·    'A guide to preparing planning proposals' requires a concise statement setting out the objectives or intended outcomes of the planning proposal. The proponent's statement is not specific enough to reliably define the likely outcome of the proposal.

 

·    In terms of overall strategic merit, it is agreed that the subject site has potential to accommodate residential uses, increased FSR and height controls. The site is located in Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy (PRCUTS) area which has a recommendation for rezoning from industrial to medium density residential. However, the Planning Proposal is inconsistent with a number of other key recommendations of PRCUTS as detailed later in this report and consequently, should not be supported.

 

·    The Proposal suggests it would provide affordable/ student housing in accordance with the development incentives available in State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009, but only in the context of a future development application. The proponent's objective is misleading as affordable housing that might be provided at the development application stage subject to the bonus floor space provisions of the SEPP 2009 is not directly related to the intent of this Planning Proposal.

 

·    The Proposal also seeks to provide open space along the site's northern edge as part of an open space and movement corridor along Johnstons Creek between Booth Street and Parramatta Road. The proponent's objective is considered to be acceptable; but no clear provision has been made in the Proposal to make this useful public open space as explained later in this report.

 

 

Part 2 Explanation of Provisions

 

 

Guideline Requirements

2.2

Requires a more detailed statement of how the objectives or intended outcomes are to be achieved.

 

The proponent has addressed this requirement but the Planning Proposal is not supported for the reasons expressed above and in other sections of this report.

 

Part 3 Justification

 

Guideline Requirements

2.3

Requires adequate justification documentation to be provided for the

specific land use and development standards proposed to the LEP.

2.3.1

Questions to consider when demonstrating the justification

Section A - Need for Planning Proposal

Q1

Is the planning proposal part of any strategic study or report?

 

The subject site forms part of the PRCUTS which recommends future development controls for the site. However, as detailed later in this report, the Proposal is inconsistent with the requirements of PRCUTS including the Implementation Plan 2016 - 2023 Out of Sequence checklist and its Planning and Design Guidelines and should not be supported.

Q2

Is the planning proposal the best means of achieving the objectives or intended outcomes, or is there a better way?

 

The PRCUTS includes the Parramatta Road Corridor Implementation Toolkit which recommends that one of the pathways to implement the recommended land uses and development controls identified within the Strategy is the LEP Gateway (Planning Proposal) process.

 

However, this Planning Proposal departs from the staging identified under the Implementation Plan 2016 – 2023 and comes in advance of studies and strategies underway at local and State government to inform future development controls for the PRCUTS corridor, the Camperdown Ultimo Collaboration Area, and the new Inner West Council local area.

 

The future of the Proposal site should be considered as part of the broader strategic planning framework rather than an ad hoc Planning Proposal. This would ensure that a systematic approach will be taken when determining the future development of the site and the surrounding area. It would be best, therefore, to defer the Proposal until the finalisation of comprehensive IWC LEP, DCP and Infrastructure Contributions Plan which would also potentially align with the staging sequence recommended in PRCUTS Implementation Plan 2016 - 2023.

Section B - Relationship to strategic planning framework

Q3a

Does the proposal have strategic merit? Is it:

i.   

Consistent with the relevant regional plan outside of the Greater Sydney Region, the relevant district plan within the Greater Sydney Region, or corridor/precinct plans applying to the site, including any draft regional, district or corridor/precinct plans released for public comment.

 

The following regional/district/corridor plans apply to the site:

 

·    Greater Sydney Region Plan 2018 (GSRP) - A Metropolis of Three Cities

·    Eastern City District Plan (ECDP) 2018

·    Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy (2016)

 

The Planning Proposal is consistent with some of the objectives and actions of GSRP and ECDP but fails to achieve sufficient consistency with following key objectives of GSRP and priorities of ECDP. A detailed analysis of the Proposal against these directions, objectives and priorities is provided in Attachment 1.

 

Direction 1: A city supported by infrastructure

 

·    Objective 2: Infrastructure aligns with forecast growth - growth infrastructure compact.

·    Strategy 2.1 - Align forecast growth with Infrastructure.

·    Strategy 2.2 - Sequence infrastructure provision across Greater Sydney using a place-based approach.

 

·    E1: Planning for a city supported by infrastructure.

 

Direction 2: A collaborative city

 

·    Objective 5: Benefits of growth realised by collaboration of governments, community and business.

 

·    E2: Working through collaboration.

Action 7: Identify, prioritise and deliver Collaboration Areas.

 

Direction 3: A city for people

 

·    Objective 6: Services and infrastructure meets communities' changing needs.

·    Objective 9: Greater Sydney celebrates the arts and supports creative industries and innovation.

·    E3: Providing services and social infrastructure to meet people's changing needs.

Direction 4: Housing the city

 

·    E5: Providing housing supply, choice and affordability with access to jobs and services.

 

Direction 7: Jobs and skills for the city

 

·    Objective 23: Industrial and urban services land is planned, retained and managed.

·    Strategy 23.1: Retain, review and plan industrial and urban services land in accordance with the principles for managing industrial and urban services land.

·    E11: Growing investment, business opportunities and jobs in strategic centres.

·    E12: Retaining and managing industrial and urban services land.

Direction 8: A city in its landscape

 

·    Objective 27: Biodiversity is protected, urban bushland and remnant vegetation is enhanced.

Strategy 27.1 - Protect and enhance by:

§ Managing urban bushland and remnant vegetation as green infrastructure

§ Managing urban development and urban bushland to reduce edge effect impacts.

 

·    Objective 31: Public open space is accessible, protected and enhanced.

·    Objective 32: The Green Grid links parks, open spaces, bushland and walking and cycling paths.

·    E15: Protecting and enhancing bushland and biodiversity.

·    E17: Increasing urban tree canopy cover and delivering Green Grid connections.

·    E18: Delivering high quality open space.

Direction 9: An efficient city

 

·    Objective 33: A low-carbon city contributes to net-zero emissions by 2050 and mitigates climate change.

·    Objective 34: Energy and water flows are captured, used and re-used.

·    Objective 35: More waste is re-used and recycled to support the development of a circular economy.

·    E19: Reducing carbon emissions and managing energy, water and waste efficiently.

The Planning Proposal is also inconsistent with Strategy documents in the following ways:

 

Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy (PRCUTS) 2016 Policy Framework:

 

The Planning Proposal does not adequately contribute towards achievement of the following Key Actions:

 

Land Uses

·    Prioritise Camperdown Precinct for biotechnology and employment uses that support the growth of the nearby institutions

·    Focus residential development on students, key workers, and affordable housing.

Open space, linkages and connections:

·    Provide new open spaces in the Hordern Place Industrial Area, and in the north of the Precinct adjacent to Johnstons Creek.

·    Prioritise works to complete the Johnstons Creek green corridor, connecting the Precinct to the Bicentennial Parklands and the harbour foreshore walks.

·    Provide new cycle routes along Johnston’s Creek, Mathieson Street, Chester Street and Guihen Street to improve connections with other cycleways.

PRCUTS Implementation Plan 2016 - 2023:

The Planning Proposal departs from the staging identified under the Implementation Plan 2016 – 2023. It also does not meet the criteria of the Out of Sequence checklist as detailed in the Attachment 2 and therefore, should not be supported.

PRCUTS Planning and Design Guidelines:

The large bulk and scale of the proposed development in association with its approach to urban design and relationship to the surrounding area make the Planning Proposal inconsistent with the following sections of Camperdown Guidelines:

 

·    12.4 - Future Character and Identity

·    12.5 - Open Space, Linkages and Connections and Public Domain

·    12.8 - Green edge setbacks, Transitions and Activity and Commercial Zones

·    Recommended Planning Controls

Land use (textual)

Building Heights (textual)

Densities (Map)

PRCUTS Infrastructure Schedule

The Planning Proposal is supported by an Integrated Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IIDP) prepared by Northrop (Attachment 15) which attempts to populate the Infrastructure Schedule for the Camperdown precinct.

 

Council officers are of the view that the PRCUTS's Infrastructure Schedule cannot be readily applied to determine accurate infrastructure contributions as the Council and State Government have not yet completed the infrastructure, transport and traffic studies necessary to update the 2016 cost estimates or capture the costs of infrastructure not covered by the Schedule.

 

In this context, the Schedule acknowledges that it is based on a high level analysis of population, dwelling and employment projections for the Corridor that will require additional detailed investigation. There are also gaps in this Schedule which cannot adequately be addressed until such time as Council implements a new local Contributions Plan. Its preparation will require additional analysis including audits of existing facilities and preparation of needs studies for the wider local government area beyond the Corridor.

 

There are reservations about the methodology used; formulas applied and the conclusions of the IIDP. Overall, it is noted that the proponent has underestimated the level of construction rates for projects listed, but not quoted in the Infrastructure Schedule. The Council's Property Capital Projects team have provided the following detailed analysis of these proposed rates in the Infrastructure schedule (p. 55 of Attachment 15):

Active Transport Network

·    Items 1-13: These works cannot be precisely estimated as the scope of works is broad and generic. Notwithstanding this the proposed base rate of $225/m is very low and the recommended rate would be approximately $350/m with some works such as site establishment being as high as $950/week.

Community Infrastructure

·    Item 14 - Meeting Space: Proponent's rate equates to $2,500/ m2 for a new building. This is very low and is anticipated to be approximately $3,500/m2 or $1.5M.

·    Item 15 - Cultural space: Proponent's rate equates to $200K/ building refurbishment which is low. This is generic without knowing which buildings are chosen and the extent of the refurbishment. In Council's view the rates should be approximately $350K-$400K per building.

·    Item 16 - Childcare: Council recently completed a 60 places childcare building at Leichhardt park for $3.5M. Using this rate would mean 49 places equates $2.86M. The rate quoted ($2M) is poor and probably excludes landscaping, furniture, fixtures and equipment.

·    Item 17 - Outside of school hours: Should be the same as above.

Road/ Intersection Upgrade

·    Item 18: This rate cannot be adequately commented until Council has completed its precinct wide traffic modelling;

Open Space and Recreation

·    Item 19–24: All the proposed rates are too generic and may apply to other areas of Sydney, however all IWC grounds usually have some form of contamination and the remediation costs are quite high. That rate should be more like $400/m2.

Camperdown Precinct Urban Amenity Improvements Program

·    Items 26-27 Proposed cycling link: The proposed rates for design, lighting and a proper cycling path have been very poorly quoted. Based on Council's recent works or the upgrade of the path (2.5m to 3m asphalt footpath and new lights between Marion Street and Parramatta Road, the rate ended up in the vicinity of $1,600/ m). For new work this should be more like $1,800- $2,000/m instead of the proposed rate $255/m.

 

Council is currently preparing its new developer contributions plan which will build financial capacity for provision of additional infrastructure in the Corridor and support future population growth in the Inner West LGA. In the absence of this critical information, Council officers are not in a position to reliably confirm the proponent's calculations and rates. Local infrastructure cannot be adequately levied for this type of proposed spot rezoning in the PRCUTS corridor until IWC adopts a new developer contributions plan.

 

Support of this Proposal could compromise the holistic and inclusive basis for achieving wider strategic planning objectives at local and State government level.

 

PRCUTS Urban Amenity Improvement Plan (UAIP)

UAIP identifies the following works for Camperdown precinct:

·    New north-south pedestrian and cycle connection along Johnstons Creek from Booth Street to Parramatta Road (Refer to the image below).

·    Public domain improvements and cycle connection to Pyrmont Bridge Road between Parramatta Road and Mallett Street.

 

Figure 11 - Extract from the UAIP (page 35) indicating the required infrastructure improvements for Camperdown precinct.

The identified works in point 1 above are the most relevant works for this Proposal site which adjoins Johnstons Creek but PRCUTS also identifies the following related projects:

 

·    Concrete shared path between Badu Park and Chester Street playground

·    Lightweight cantilevered walkway over the existing channel between Chester Street playground and Mathieson Street.

The proposed conceptual diagram in the above Figure 11 envisages a landscaped edge along both sides of the stormwater channel. The concept design for the Planning Proposal does not make an adequate contribution towards achieving this vision. The proposed basement setback (nil to 2m) cannot accommodate the modest to large scale trees that would be needed to create this 'landscaped edge'.

 

It is also envisaged that this landscaped edge would be a continuous link along the eastern side of Johnstons Creek. Support of this concept design without an adequate landscaped setback would set an adverse precedent for the landowners and developers of adjoining properties and compromise Council's vision to achieve a green corridor along the creek.

 

In addition, the original Planning Proposal sought to provide a new east-west pedestrian and cycling bridge at the south-western end of the site. This second bridge was considered unnecessary in light of Council's own current project to reinstate the existing bridge at the northern end of the site and would replicate its function. The proposed extra bridge also would not provide a link between any key points other than the site itself and would therefore, be superfluous.  The revised Planning Proposal submitted in response to Council's preliminary comments deletes the proposed bridge and seeks to make contributions towards Council's replacement of the existing bridge.

 

A new north-south pedestrian and cycle link along Johnstons Creek corridor on the subject site and across the neighbouring sites is desirable as recommended in PRCUTS. Council officers are not in a position yet to confirm the finer details of the envisaged north-south Johnstons Creek link as no associated work or studies have been undertaken at this stage to identify the cost/ delivery mechanisms and design for these works.

 

Any monetary contributions or potential land reservations required for the delivery of these works, therefore, cannot be accurately determined at this stage. The Planning Proposal should not be supported until such time as Council completes this piece of work and other broader strategic planning works which would assist in the making of an informed decision regarding the redevelopment of this site.

PRCUTS Precinct Transport Report

From a transport and traffic perspective with information currently available, the projected traffic volume levels (both the applicant’s and Council’s estimates) are generally acceptable for the adjacent street network. In addition, as the precinct develops public transport along Parramatta Road should be enhanced and mode share should increasingly move toward sustainable transport modes with a reduction in private vehicle use.

 

The proposed design concept indicates a mix of 1 and 2 bedroom apartment units with 15 one bedroom units and 27 two bedroom units. In accordance with the recommended maximum car parking rates in the PRCUTS Precinct Transport Report for Camperdown, the Proposal should provide a maximum of 23.4 car parking spaces (calculated @ 0.3 spaces for 1 bedroom and 0.7 spaces for 2 bedroom units).

 

In the proponent's letter to Council dated 29 May 2018, it was indicated that the proposal would provide 24 car parking bays 'less than the maximum requirement of PRCUTS'. This calculation is incorrect as the 23.4 car parking spaces would only be acceptable if the Proposal met he PRCUTS recommendations for provision of car sharing, unbundled or decoupled parking. The proponent has indicated that car share, unbundled or decoupled parking will not be considered until the future development application stage so the proposal fails to demonstrate how these measures could be achieved at the Planning Proposal stage.

 

It should also be acknowledged that until Council adopts new Development Control Plan parking controls, the Proposal's parking provision does not comply with LDCP standards.

 

The PRCUTS Precinct Transport Report also stipulates that 'prior to any rezoning commencing, a Precinct wide traffic study and supporting modelling be completed which will consider the proposed land uses and densities, as well as future WestConnex conditions, and identify the necessary road improvements and upgrades that are required to be delivered as part of any proposed renewal in the Camperdown precinct'.

 

This Planning Proposal comes in advance of any such work being completed and should not be supported.

 

PRCUTS Fine Grain Study:

The Proposal has been assessed in detail against the requirements of the Fine Grain Study in Attachments 1 and 2.

 

The Planning Proposal does not adequately meet the Fine Grain planning and design guidelines and should not be supported.

PRCUTS Sustainability Implementation Plan

The Planning Proposal relies on a future Development Application to demonstrate consistency with the relevant Sustainability and Resilience Principles. This is inconsistent with the recommendations of the PRCUTS which require a 'Planning Proposal' to sufficiently demonstrate that it would achieve or exceed the sustainability targets as identified in the Strategy.

Conclusion:

The Planning Proposal fails to meet the Strategic Merit test as it is inconsistent with the GSRP, ECDP and PRCUTS and therefore, should not be supported.

ii.  

Consistent with a relevant local council strategy that has been endorsed by the Department.

 

At this stage, there are no relevant local strategies that have been endorsed by the Department that are applicable to the site.

 

Inner West Council is currently preparing a wide range of broader strategic planning work including but not limited to:

 

·    Local Housing Strategy

·    Local Strategic Planning Statement

·    Employment Lands Review

·    Local Infrastructure Contributions Plan

·    Integrated Transport Plan

·    Comprehensive IWC LEP and DCP

·    Affordable Housing Contribution Scheme

·    Camperdown Ultimo Collaboration area framework

·    PRCUTS precinct wide traffic modelling

 

This work is currently underway and will potentially be endorsed by the Department over the next 1 - 3 years. This work will be the key to making informed decisions in relation to the future development and rezoning of this site and other sites in the precinct.

 

Given the significance and timing of this strategic planning work, it is recommended that this Planning Proposal be deferred until such time as Council adopts and publishes the IW LEP and DCP. This will allow Council to apply an integrated land use and infrastructure approach across the local government area to deliver coordinated outcomes for housing, jobs, transport infrastructure, social infrastructure, open spaces and urban services land.

 

Support of this Proposal in its current form and timing would compromise the holistic and inclusive basis of this wider strategic planning exercise and weaken Council's decision making process.

 

It is recommended that the Planning Proposal should not be supported. 

iii. 

Responding to a certain change in circumstances, such as investment in new infrastructure or changing demographic trends that have not been recognised by existing planning controls.

 

PRCUTS identifies changing demographic trends for the Corridor and provides possible future land use and built form controls to respond to these trends.

 

The Proposal is inconsistent with the projected demographic trends in Parramatta Road Corridor Strategy for Camperdown precinct. The Strategy forecasts that there would be 700 new dwellings in the precinct by 2050. However, there is no proposed indicative increase in residential Gross Floor Area until after 2023 as shown in the table below; in other words no new residential development is envisaged in the Camperdown precinct before 2023.

 

Table 2 - Extract from PRC Planning and Design Guidelines (p. 256)

The Planning Proposal also comes in advance of any infrastructure improvements in the area especially for public transport on Parramatta Road.

 

This Proposal would result in additional dwellings in the short term without these improvements in infrastructure which would be key to realising the vision of this Strategy. The PRCUTS Implementation Plan provides an 'Out of Sequence' checklist which prescribes a merit assessment process to determine whether proposals that are not fully aligned with the Implementation Plan should proceed before 2023. As detailed in the Attachment 2, the Planning Proposal fails to meet this Out of Sequence test and should not be supported.

Q3

Does the proposal have strategic merit with regard to the following:

i.   

the natural environment (including known significant environmental values, resources or hazards)

 

The Proposal is considered to be unsatisfactory in this regard. The site is affected by a significant flood risk along the Johnstons Creek boundary. The proponent's concept design provides a 5m setback on the lower ground level to the new dwellings along Johnstons Creek site boundary but the basement is only setback by nil to 2m from the creek boundary. This is insufficient to allow the planting of modest sized trees required to enhance the natural environment of Johnstons Creek.

 

Should the Planning Proposal proceed, the basement would have to be setback in line with the upper levels of the building to accommodate modest sized tree plantings.

ii.  

the existing uses, approved uses, and likely future uses of land in the vicinity of the proposal

 

These would be same specifically PRCUTS strategic merit in rezoning the site from industrial to residential.

 

However, the Proposal comes in advance of broader strategic planning work including preparation of the Local Housing Strategy, implementation of the Camperdown Ultimo Collaboration Area initiative and an Employment Lands Review. These studies should be completed to allow an informed decision in relation to the future uses of the site and its possible rezoning from industrial to residential.

 

In the absence of this important work, the Proposal does not have adequate site-specific merit to support its rezoning.

iii. 

The services and infrastructure that are or will be available to meet the demands arising from the proposal and any proposed financial arrangements for infrastructure provision.

 

The Planning Proposal would result in a small increase in population density which would place limited pressure on existing services and infrastructure. The Proposal is out of alignment with the proposed infrastructure delivery schedule for Parramatta Road corridor.

 

The Proposal does offer to make financial agreements for infrastructure provision at local and State level but its suggested contributions and scope of works are inadequate as discussed previously.

 

Council is currently preparing its new infrastructure contributions plan which will build financial capacity for provision of additional infrastructure in the Corridor and support future population growth in the Inner West LGA. Local infrastructure cannot be adequately levied for this type of proposed spot rezonings in the PRCUTS corridor until such time as IWC adopts a new Developer Contributions Plan.

 

At this stage, Council cannot make an informed decision regarding the redevelopment of the site or any site along the PRCUTS corridor.

 

It is recommended that the Proposal is not supported until such work has been completed by Council.

 

 

Q4

Is the planning proposal consistent with a council's strategy or other local strategic plan?

 

The Planning Proposal is inconsistent with the following local council strategies and plans:

 

Inner West Council Community Strategic Plan

(See Attachment 1 for assessment)

·    Strategic Direction 1: An ecologically sustainable inner west

1.1 The people and infrastructure of Inner West contribute positively to the environment and tackling climate change.

1.2 Inner West has a diverse and increasing urban forest that supports connected habitats for flora and fauna.

 

·    Strategic Direction 2: Unique, liveable, networked neighbourhoods

2.1 Development is designed for sustainability and makes life better.

2.2 The unique character and heritage of neighbourhoods is retained and enhanced.

2.3 Public spaces are high-quality, welcoming and enjoyable places, seamlessly connected with their surroundings.

2.4 Everyone has a roof over their head and a suitable place to call home.

2.6 People are walking, cycling and moving around Inner West with ease.

 

·    Strategic Direction 3: Creative communities and a strong economy

3.1 Creativity and culture are valued and celebrated.

3.2 Inner West is the home of creative industries and services.

3.3 The local economy is thriving.

3.4 Employment is diverse and accessible.

 

·    Strategic Direction 5: Progressive local leadership

5.3 Government makes responsible decisions to manage finite resources in the best interest of current and future communities.

Leichhardt Integrated Transport Plan

The Planning Proposal comes in advance of the completion of traffic and transport studies to determine the cumulative traffic impacts of the Corridor transformation and what infrastructure provision is needed to accommodate these impacts.

Although the Proposal is too small to have significant detrimental impacts on adjacent road intersections, there are concerns regarding the area-wide implications of the cumulative effect of PRCUTS developments. Support of this Planning Proposal ahead of the current IWC Parramatta Road Corridor traffic modelling would set a premature and adverse precedent in the area and would be inconsistent with the requirements of Out of Sequence Checklist. Detailed comments are provided in Attachment 2.

Leichhardt Economic and Employment Development Plan (EEDP) - (Outcome 4 - Protect and Leverage Economic Assets)

There are currently a number of contradictory policies at State and local level regarding the protection of industrial land. These include the Leichhardt EEDP. The proponent gives precedence to PRCUTS and the associated Section 9.1 direction to make the case for rezoning from industrial to residential. The proponent also claims that the proposed development would incorporate 2 Small Office, Home Office (SOHO) units creating 8 professional services jobs.

It is acknowledged that the Planning Proposal for rezoning has some merit in the context of Section 9.1 Direction 7.3 ‘Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy’ and the broad policy direction of the Strategy. However, the former Leichhardt Council in its 2016 approval of its Industrial Precinct Planning report for exhibition indicated serious concerns about the loss of industrial land in the LGA in general and in each precinct including Camperdown.

In addition, the proponent's justification for loss of industrial land by providing SOHO units creating 8 jobs in the area is considered to be unsatisfactory. The industrial lands are required for economic and employment purposes and 2 live work units are not an adequate replacement.

Furthermore, the PRCUTS recommendation to rezone the site to residential is in itself somewhat at odds with the Camperdown precinct's future role as a specialised medical and health precinct. The biotechnology hub role for Camperdown also underpins the work that Council is currently undertaking in collaboration with the GSC to inform the vision and narrative for the Camperdown Ultimo Collaboration Area.

Council's support for this Proposal would be a departure from a consistently held strategic planning position to resist rezoning industrial lands for residential or mixed use purposes in former Leichhardt Council LGA. Any form of residential development within the precinct may set a precedent for further development resulting in loss of biotechnology employment generating land.

Council will be reviewing all its employment lands as part of the wider LEP integration work. The Planning Proposal is considered to be premature in this respect and should not be supported. The site and its future uses should be planned holistically in the context of the Camperdown Collaboration Area and the Camperdown precinct's contribution to the revitalisation of Parramatta Road Corridor rather than in an ad hoc piecemeal manner.

Inner West Council Affordable Housing Policy

There are discrepancies throughout the Planning Proposal in relation to Affordable Housing. The proponent mentions that 7.5% of new GFA would be provided as affordable housing but no definite provisions have been made in the Planning Proposal report or supporting letter of offer to demonstrate how this affordable housing would be provided.

Part 1 Objectives or Intended Outcomes of the Planning Proposal refers to affordable/ student housing being provided in accordance with the floor space incentives of the Affordable Housing SEPP 2009. This indicates that affordable housing would only be provided over and above the maximum sought FSR of 2.6:1 resulting in a maximum FSR of 2.67:1 (@3% bonus FSR) which would result in a bulkier built form with unreasonable amenity impacts on the surrounding area.

This creates an ambiguity in relation to whether the provision of any affordable housing would be through the Planning Proposal process or a future DA. It also creates the possibility that additional FSR could be sought if the PP proceeded to the DA stage.

 

The proponent's letter to Council dated 31 May 2018 in response to the additional information request from Council states that the ‘Affordable Housing Contribution is provided in addition to the infrastructure contribution’. However, the revised letter of offer to Council dated 28 May 2018 only relates to infrastructure contributions and does not make any offer to provide affordable housing.

 

In addition, it is noted that the PP documentation refers to the dedication of affordable housing through a covenant on title with dwellings to be operated by a Registered Community Housing Provider. This is inconsistent with Council’s Affordable Housing Policy and would not be supported. The Proposal is also premature in light of Council’s recent inclusion in the SEPP 70 application area which requires Council to prepare affordable housing contribution schemes for relevant proposed developments.

 

In relation to the suggestion in the Planning Proposal that 7.5% of the additional GFA could be provided as affordable housing, there is no certainty that this would actually materialise in a manner that would meet the requirements of Council’s Affordable Housing Policy, Greater Sydney Region Plan 2018 and Eastern City District Plan 2018.

 

The Planning Proposal is therefore inconsistent with Council's affordable housing policy and requirements.

 

Q5

Is the planning proposal consistent with applicable State Environmental Planning Policies?

 

A detailed analysis of the Planning Proposal against the SEPPs has been provided in Attachment 1. The Planning Proposal fails to demonstrate consistency with the following:

 

SEPP 65 - Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development

The Planning Proposal is not adequately consistent with the following design qualities principles of SEPP 65:

·    Principle 1: Context and neighbourhood character

·    Principle 2: Built form and scale

·    Principle 3: Density

 

The Proposal is also inconsistent with elements of the planning and design criteria required by the Apartment Design Guide (ADG). The proposal raises concerns regarding potential amenity impacts on the surrounding properties as it provides inadequate building setbacks and transitions. A detailed analysis of the proposed design scheme is provided under Q8 further in this report.

 

SEPP 70 - Affordable Housing (Revised Schemes)

IWC has recently been included in the SEPP 70 application area to secure affordable housing in accordance with the Policy. To apply IWC's Affordable Housing Policy under SEPP 70, Council will need to prepare an affordable housing contribution scheme to support each new Planning Proposal where contributions for affordable housing are required. This work has not yet been completed.

 

Support of this Planning Proposal in advance of Council's broader affordable housing strategic planning work would compromise Council's ability to achieve integrated planning and provide affordable housing.

 

Q6

Is the planning proposal consistent with applicable Ministerial Directions (s. 9.1 Direction previously s117)?

 

A detailed analysis of the Planning Proposal against the Section 9.1 Directions has been provided in Attachment 1. The Planning Proposal fails to demonstrate consistency with the following Section 9.1 Directions:

 

1.1 Business and Industrial Zones

This s9.1 direction intends to retain the business and industrial zones but it contradicts s9.1 direction No. 7.3 in relation to implementation of Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy which recommends rezoning of the site from industrial to residential.

 

Former Leichhardt Council's policies and draft strategies oppose loss of existing industrial land because of the high demand for such land and its critical function in supporting a growing population and economy. Recently completed employment lands peer reviews for industrial land rezoning proposals in IWC confirmed that there is now an even higher demand for, and a shortfall of, available industrial land in South Sydney and North Shore industrial markets (Inner West is in the South Sydney industrial submarket). This is reflected by current high rents and market prices of industrial land in the area.

 

In the context of this shortfall of employment land at a sub-regional level, as acknowledged in the GSRP and ECDP, and the s9.1 Direction No. 1.1 in relation to protection of employment land in business and industrial zones; it is recommended that the Planning Proposal is not supported.

 

7.3 Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy

As discussed previously under Q1, the proposal does not fully comply with PRCUTS in the following ways:

 

·    It does not adequately address the Strategic Key Actions relating to Land uses and Open spaces, linkages and connections for Camperdown precinct.

·    It departs from the Staging identified in the PRCUTS Implementation Plan 2016 – 2023

·    It does not adequately meet the Out of Sequence Checklist merit test as:

It fails to demonstrate that it can significantly contribute towards the Strategy’s corridor wide and Precinct specific vision;

It is inconsistent with elements of all seven land use and transport transport planning principles of the Strategy and does not and cannot fulfil all the relevant Strategic Actions for each Principle.

It fails to demonstrate any significant net community, economic and environmental benefits for the Corridor and the Camperdown precinct area.

It is inconsistent with the land uses and building height recommendations in the text of the PRCUTS Planning and Design Guidelines plus others for density, open space, active transport and built form plans for Camperdown precinct area.

It fails to demonstrate that it can achieve outcomes aligned with the desired future character and growth projections for the area identified in the Strategy.

It does not achieve satisfactory design excellence in relation to its proposed built form, density and sustainability outcomes.

It cannot make an appropriate contribution towards the provision of local and state infrastructure as it comes in advance of the Council’s new local contributions plan and the State Government's State Infrastructure Contribution levy.

It does not demonstrate that it can achieve the sustainability targets of PRCUTS. In fact as an Out of Sequence Proposal, it should exceed the targets stipulated in the Strategy considering it's out of sequence nature.

It does not provide a thorough land use and development scenario to demonstrate economic feasibility with regard to the likely costs of infrastructure and the proposed funding arrangements for its delivery in the Camperdown Precinct area.

It does not demonstrate a land use and development scenario that aligns with and responds to the market conditions for the delivery of housing and employment. Unfortunately, in the absence of this information, viability appears to be the only justification driving the redevelopment of the site.

·    It is inconsistent with the built form envisaged in the Planning and Design Guidelines for both the Corridor as a whole and the Camperdown Precinct Guidelines.

·    It is inconsistent with the type of residential uses recommended in the PRCUTS which should be for key workers, affordable housing and student housing.

·    It exceeds the recommended density in the Planning and Design Guidelines by 73.3%.

 

This Planning Proposal relies on the PRCUTS for its justification but fails to satisfactorily address all the requirements of the Strategy as outlined before. PRCUTS requires a substantial contribution towards the Strategy's wider vision for proposals outside the 2016 - 2023 Implementation area. This is particularly difficult to achieve for small sites like Chester Street.

 

The most appropriate way to facilitate redevelopment of the site and review its land use and development controls will be as part of the broader strategic planning work for Council's new LEP and DCP.

 

The Planning Proposal is inconsistent with this policy direction and should not be supported at this stage.

Q7

Is there any likelihood that critical habitat or threatened species, populations or ecological communities or their habitats will be adversely affected as a result of the proposal?

 

There are no critical known habitat, threatened species, populations or ecological communities or their habitats on the subject site.

 

There are several trees and other vegetation on the boundary of the subject property with Johnstons Creek which contribute to this green corridor.

 

The proponent's concept design provides a 5m setback on the ground level to the creek boundary. However, the basement is only setback by 0 - 2m which is insufficient to accommodate medium to large size trees.

 

Should the Planning Proposal proceed, the proposed design would have to be revised to provide adequate basement and ground level setbacks which would contribute to the green corridor along the creek and enhance the environmental value of the area.

Q8

Are there any other likely environmental effects as a result of the planning proposal and how are they proposed to be managed?

 

A detailed analysis of the Proposal's environmental effects is provided below:

 

Urban Design and Built form

The proposed siting strategy is acceptable in view of the irregular shape of the lot as the building form provides an opportunity to address primary and secondary street frontages (Chester Street and Johnstons Creek) (Figure 12). However, the design raises concerns regarding the proposed setbacks, building heights, landscaping, overshadowing of the adjoining properties and self-overshadowing of communal open space and the building itself.

Figure 12 - Extract from the proponent's design scheme with a 5 storey building facing Chester street, 6 storey building facing Johnstons Creek communal open space on the ground level and roof top level.

Figure 13 - Building envelope views including subject site and potential redevelopment of adjoining property.

The key concerns in relation to the proposed concept design are detailed below:

Overshadowing: The proposed communal open space on the ground level of the development is completely overshadowed in mid-winter between 9 am to 3pm as shown in the image below.  This would adversely impact the amenity of the future residents of the development.

Figure 14 - Overshadowing analysis of the proposed development.

Setbacks: The proposed building setbacks are insufficient. These do not meet the minimum requirements of the Apartment Design Guide (ADG) and could result in adverse impacts on the surrounding area.

 

Setback to Chester Street: The proposed 5 storey development provides a nil setback to Chester Street. This would result in a large portion of the site being built to the street boundary without adequate setbacks and transitions. The proponent's intention to reinstate the industrial character of the area through zero street setbacks is acceptable in principle; however it  would result in a large bulky 5 storey building on Chester Street which is inconsistent with the existing and future desired character for the area. In particular, it is noted that the proposed schematic design relies on the adjacent site across the street (at No. 8 Guihen Street) to provide an additional setback to offset its own lack of setback (as shown in the section below Figure 15).

Figure 15 - Extract from proponent's Urban Design scheme indicating the relationship of the built form along Chester Street with the adjacent building at No. 8 Guihen Street. Red blurb indicating the potential street widening on the adjacent site.

The ADG requires a separation distance of 18m between habitable rooms/ balconies or 12m between habitable and non-habitable rooms for buildings between 5 to 8 storeys. In this regard, the proposal would provide an inadequate separation distance to 8 Guihen Street and restrict its development potential by assuming that this site in another ownership would accommodate any necessary widening of Chester Street. This approach is unacceptable and the proponent should work within the constraints of their own site without relying on the contribution of setbacks/ widenings from adjacent sites.

Notwithstanding this 5 storey street wall height along Chester Street is also inconsistent with the character of the surrounding area. In this regard, upper levels should be setback to reinforce the desired scale of buildings at the street frontage.

The proponent has also not demonstrated how the proposed development would maintain the visual privacy of future residents. The proposed units on the ground floor along Chester Street do not provide adequate visual/ acoustic privacy (as shown below in Figure 16).

Figure 16 - Indicative ground level of the proposed development.

In addition, a ground level setback to Chester Street would be desirable:

to improve passive surveillance and ensure that a person on a balcony or at a window can easily see the street; and

to create a prioritised walking link along Chester Street (as required by PRCUTS) through street and footpath widening.

 

Setback to Johnstons Creek: The proposed development provides a 5m setback to the ground level units facing Johnstons Creek and a 0 - 2m setback to the basement along this frontage. It is noted that the proposed design does not contribute much towards the enhancement of Johnstons Creek corridor as it only provides the minimum setback required from the site boundary to mitigate flood impacts. The proposed basement setback is insufficient to provide deep soil planting for a landscaped edge which would enhance the environmental value of Johnstons Creek.

 

The site's interface with Johnstons Creek is highly significant as it forms part of the future green link between Parramatta Road and Booth Street leading to Bicentennial Park and the harbour foreshore. The Proposal has the potential to contribute towards the enhancement of this corridor by providing adequate setbacks and building transition but fails to do so adequately.

 

Bulk, form and scale - The proposed building height of 5 storeys along Chester Street and 6 storeys along Johnstons Creek raises concerns regarding visual/ privacy impacts on the surrounding properties.  The upper levels of the development should be appropriately setback to create a gradual transition towards the lower scale dwellings to the north of the creek and reduce any potential visual/ privacy impacts.

 

The proposed development would result in a bulky building block facing Johnstons Creek and Chester Street without adequate transitions and articulations. The proposed building elements splayed in triangular fashion result in a poor corner building urban design outcome.

 

The building form and scale should be redesigned to avoid hard edge environmental outcomes and to ensure that it is not overwhelming for the residential dwellings to the north and west; and for the users of Johnstons Creek public domain corridor.

 

Deep soil planting - The proposed basement setback of 0 - 2m is insufficient to accommodate modest deep soil planting including medium and large sized trees. The basement must be adequately setback in line with the upper levels of the building to provide adequate deep soil planting; and potentially enhance and expand Johnstons Creek public domain corridor. Large trees would also soften the visual impact of the building and create a green link along the corridor to provide more open space for the future residents of the development and the surrounding area.

 

Communal Open Space - The proponent's design to provide communal open space on the roof is acceptable subject to any visual/ acoustic privacy impacts on the adjoining sites. However, the proposal should not rely completely on roof top open space to meet the requirements of the Apartment Design Guide (ADG) that a minimum 25% of the site area be provided as communal open space. The communal open space should ideally be co-located with deep soil areas to provide an enhanced useable space.

 

In order to resolve the above design issues, the proposal would have to be revised to reduce the bulk and provide adequate setbacks, articulations and transitions. The recommended density of 1.5:1 and building height of 17m in PRCUTS are appropriate development controls for the site. These would adequately resolve the above issues and achieve a built form that is consistent with the existing and desired future character of the area.

 

Traffic and Transport

 

Prior to assessing the traffic and transport impacts in detail, the Planning Proposal must adequately demonstrate that it meets all the criteria of the PRCUTS Precinct Transport Report and Implementation Plan including the current IWC PRCUTS traffic and transport study to proceed to rezoning.

There are concerns regarding the potential area-wide implications of a cumulative rezoning/ up zoning of sites in the Parramatta Corridor in the absence of adequate public transport infrastructure.

In future as the precinct develops and Parramatta Road is enhanced and mode share moves towards sustainable transport modes; the proponent's projected traffic volumes would generally be at acceptable levels for the adjacent street network.

Should the proposal proceed, detailed design aspects, including driveway configuration and pedestrian access points will need to be addressed at the development application stage.

Streets in the area are frequented by a mix of traffic and many of the footpaths are narrow and/or in poor condition.  This is likely to result in significantly increased pedestrian/vehicle conflict associated with pedestrian’s using the carriageway rather than footpaths. Consequently, care should be taken to ensure pedestrian (and cyclist) safety in the neighbourhood, if this residential development were to proceed.

Heritage

Any proposed development on the subject site must respond appropriately to the adjoining Annandale Heritage Conservation Area (HCA) and its future extension. In this regard, the proposed development would have to provide appropriate building setbacks and transitions to respect the values and character of the HCA.

Noise impact

The proposal would not generate any adverse noise impact; however the site is located adjacent to an existing pocket park. The use and enjoyment of the pocket park must be considered when designing the built form.

The proposed units on the ground floor along Chester Street do not provide adequate visual/ acoustic privacy for the future residents of the development and surrounding area as discussed previously. The future residents would be significantly affected by the imminent installation of a basketball hoop and concrete pad in the pocket park by Council. The proposed dwellings on the ground floor level are therefore a concern in terms of their relationship with the use and enjoyment of the pocket park. There are similar concerns in relation to the dwellings facing Johnstons Creek which will be close to the future shared path.

If the Planning Proposal proceeds to the DA stage, the proposed development consent must be conditioned to incorporate acoustic walls and measures to protect the visual and acoustic privacy of its future residents and ensure long term recreational use of the park and shared path along Johnstons Creek is not compromised by complaints from these residents.

Stormwater management and flooding

The subject site has significant flooding issues as it is located in a flood prone area and adjoins the Johnstons Creek Stormwater channel.

Any proposed development must not increase the risk of flooding of the subject site and other properties along the creek line and should also be designed to improve flood flows. All floor levels for the new development must be at or above the Flood Planning Level (100 year ARI flood level plus 500mm freeboard) or RL 5.45. The proposed basement carpark must be designed to ensure all entries/accesses are located above the Probable Maximum Flood level.

The proponent has revised the concept design in response to Council's preliminary concerns. The revised design is set back from the channel by 5 metres to retain the overbank flood flow capacity.

A detailed stormwater assessment would have to be provided at the development application stage to ensure that the proposed design meets DCP requirements relating to stormwater design and environmental initiatives.

Landscape

The site contains a number of existing trees. It is recommended that the proposal be amended to retain and protect the existing trees as per Leichhardt DCP Park C Section 1 C1.14. The lack of deep soil area in the proposal reduces the potential for increasing urban forest canopy.  The zero setbacks at basement level would compromise existing trees on the property boundary with Johnstons Creek, despite the 5 metre setback at ground level.

 

Whilst no detailed landscape plan has been provided, the representations of shrubs shown in the ground floor courtyard, the rooftop and the green privacy buffer on the southern corner, and based on past experience of the size of plants used in such areas, an estimated canopy for the site is one percent. Combined with the possible loss of tree canopy along the boundary with Johnstons Creek the site would suffer net loss of canopy, which conflicts with the State’s urban tree canopy goals and Council’s urban forest policy objectives.

 

Should the Planning Proposal proceed to Gateway stage, the following design amendments would have to be made:

 

An urban forest canopy target for the site of 25% should be achieved.

 

This reflects the Draft Regional and District Plans goals of increasing urban forest canopy, and also those of the urban forest policies of Inner West Council.  25% is considered an appropriate target for inner city multi-storey residential development.

 

A minimum of 10% of the site area should be required as deep soil area, with a minimum dimension of 4 metres (either length or width).

 

Based on the Apartment Design Guide, Section 3E, 12% of the site would be required as deep soil area to achieve a 25% tree canopy with two large trees.  Twice that area would be required for nine medium size trees.  A minimum of 4 metres setback for medium size trees and 6 metres for large trees is required for the trees to achieve the desired spread.

 

o The basement should be setback in line with the ground floor footprint to facilitate a deep soil area and potentially retain the existing trees along the boundary.

 

An Arboricultural Impact Assessment (AIA) report incorporating a tree protection plan and specification would be required to be submitted with a DA.

 

Development planning issues in relation to the existing trees will need to be addressed in more detail with any DA.

 

The ground level building on Chester Street should be setback to improve amenity. Tree and understorey planting should be provided along the Chester Street frontage to improve amenity, increase the quality of the streetscape, improve the pedestrian environment and contribute to land value.

 

WSUD principles should be incorporated as per the Leichhardt Environmental Sustainability Plan 2015 - 2025 to manage on-site overland water flows and minimse the risk of flooding on adjacent lots.

Contamination

The subject site has been associated with industrial uses. The proponent has provided a Remedial Action Plan prepared by EI Australia dated July 2017 which concludes that the site can be made suitable for the proposed residential use.

Should the Proceed to the Development Application stage, a detailed contamination report, site management plan and hazardous building survey must be provided prior to any demolition or redevelopment.

Conclusion

The proposal in its current form is likely to result in unreasonable environmental impacts including setting an adverse built form precedent for the surrounding area. The proposal's built form would also be an impediment to achieving Council and UrbanGrowth's vision in relation to a new enhanced green corridor along Johnstons Creek from Parramatta Road to Booth Street.

 

Whilst it is acknowledged that some of these issues can be resolved by amending the FSR in the Planning Proposal and the proposed built form envelope in the DCP; given the broader strategic planning issues relating to the land use, traffic studies and the inconsistency with the Out of Sequence