AGENDA R

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Council Meeting

 

TUESDAY 11 DECEMBER 2018

 

6.30pm


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Live Streaming of Council Meeting

 

In the spirit of open, accessible and transparent government, this meeting of the Inner West Council is being streamed live on Council’s website. By speaking at a Council meeting, members of the public agree to being recorded and must ensure their speech to the Council is respectful and use appropriate language. A person who uses defamatory, discriminatory or offensive language may be exposed to liability for which Council takes no responsibility. Any part of this meeting that is held in closed session will not be recorded

 

Pre-Registration to Speak at Council Meetings

 

Members of the public must register by 2pm of the day of the Meeting to speak at Council Meetings. If you wish to register to speak please fill in a Register to Speak Form, available from the Inner West Council website, including:

 

Are there any rules for speaking at a Council Meeting?

The following rules apply when addressing a Council meeting:

 

What happens after I submit the form?

Your request will then be added to a list that is shown to the Chairperson on the night of the meeting.

 

Where Items are deferred, Council reserves the right to defer speakers until that Item is heard on the next occasion.

 

Accessibility

 

Inner West Council is committed to ensuring people with a disability have equal opportunity to take part in Council and Committee Meetings. At the Ashfield Council Chambers there is a hearing loop service available to assist persons with a hearing impairment. If you have any other access or disability related participation needs and wish to know more, call 9392 5657.

 

Persons in the public gallery are advised that under the Local Government Act 1993, a person may NOT tape record a Council meeting without the permission of Council.

 

Any persons found recording without authority will be expelled from the meeting.

 

“Record” includes the use of any form of audio, video and still camera equipment or mobile phone capable of recording speech.

 

An audio recording of this meeting will be taken for the purpose of verifying the accuracy of the minutes.  

 

 

   


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

 

 

PRECIS

 

 

1          Acknowledgement of Country

 

2          Apologies

 

3          Notice of Webcasting

 

4          Disclosures of Interest (Section 451 of the Local Government Act
and Council’s Code of Conduct)
 

 

5          Moment of Quiet Contemplation

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                         Page

Minutes of 27 November 2018 Council Meeting                                                              6

 

7          Mayoral Minutes

 

Nil at the time of printing.

8          Condolence Motions

 

Nil at the time of printing.

9          Staff Reports

 

ITEM                                                                                                                                    PAGE #

 

C1218(1) Item 1       Code of Conduct Complaints Statistic Report                                       25

C1218(1) Item 2       Internal Ombudsman Shared Service Annual Report 2017-2018         28

C1218(1) Item 3       Change in Parking Meter Operational Hours in the side streets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain                                                                                            72

C1218(1) Item 4       Aboriginal Frontier War Memorial                                                        129

C1218(1) Item 5       Aboriginal Names for Inner West Council Wards                                135

C1218(1) Item 6       Live Music Action Plan                                                                         137

C1218(1) Item 7       Multicultural Policy Implementation                                                     155

C1218(1) Item 8       Portuguese Community Collaboration Protocols                                 159

C1218(1) Item 9       Gambling Harm Minimisation                                                               167

C1218(1) Item 10     Open Inner West 2018/19 Program for Endorsement                         171

C1218(1) Item 11     Birchgrove Wharf - Accessibility Options through Yurulbin Park        184

C1218(1) Item 12     Camperdown Memorial Rest ParkSafe Update on the Outcomes of Community Engagement                                                                                         318

C1218(1) Item 13     Yeo Park and Gough Reserve Plan of Management - Administration Error    354

C1218(1) Item 14     Pathway to Carbon Neutral Council                                                     432

C1218(1) Item 15     Balmain Leagues Club Precinct Development Control Plan Amendment       467

C1218(1) Item 16     Amendment to Ashfield LEP 2013 - Heritage Conservation Clauses 804

C1218(1) Item 17     Amendment to Inner West DCP 2016 for 2-6 Cavill Avenue Ashfield 827

C1218(1) Item 18     Victoria Road Precinct, Marrickville - Draft Developer Contributions Plan Update                                                                                                              876

C1218(1) Item 19     Harmonising Inner West Council Awards Programs                           881

C1218(1) Item 20     Appointment of Consultant as Developer Contributions Specialist      894

C1218(1) Item 21     Proposed Change to the Boarding House Provisions under State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009 to Limit Boarding Houses in the R2 Low Density Residential zone to a Maximum of 12 Rooms                897

C1218(1) Item 22     Model Code of Meeting Practice                                                         913

C1218(1) Item 23     Fee Waiver for use of Aquatic Centres                                                963

C1218(1) Item 24     Post Exhibition Report - Glebe Island Silos VPA                                 967

C1218(1) Item 25     Mandatory reporting of Fire Safety Reports referred to Council from Fire and Rescue NSW                                                                                                     985

C1218(1) Item 26     Statement of Business Ethics                                                              996

C1218(1) Item 27     Resource Recovery Operations Review                                           1005

C1218(1) Item 28     Brief Report of Best Practice Food Recycling                                   1007

C1218(1) Item 29     Inner West Council Land and Property Policy and Strategy             1013

 

10        Notices of Motion

 

ITEM                                                                                                                                    PAGE #

 

C1218(1) Item 30     Notice of Motion: Norton Street Footpath and Stormwater Works    1066

C1218(1) Item 31     Notice of Motion: The Pump House, Balmain Cove                          1067

C1218(1) Item 32     Notice of Motion: 12 Month Trial of Regulatory Staff being On Call, After Busieness Hours                                                                                                  1071

C1218(1) Item 33     Notice of Motion: Impacts of Multi-Dwelling Development upon on-street parking                                                                                                            1073

C1218(1) Item 34     Notice of Motion: Open Space Funding                                             1074

C1218(1) Item 35     Notice of Motion: Grants Program                                                     1075

C1218(1) Item 36     Notice of Motion: Former Haberfield Army Reserve Depot              1076

C1218(1) Item 37     Notice of Motion: Acknowledgement of NSW Government’s ‘Cooler Classrooms Fund'                                                                                                            1080

C1218(1) Item 38     Notice of Motion: Changes to 444 and 445 Bus Services Affecting Balmain Peninsula                                                                                                            1082

C1218(1) Item 39     Notice of Motion: Stormwater Drain Maintenance                            1084

C1218(1) Item 40     Notice of Motion: De-Amalgamation                                                  1104

C1218(1) Item 41     Notice of Motion: Tree and Street Sweeping Issue                           1105

C1218(1) Item 42     Notice of Motion: Alcohol Free Zone                                                 1106

 

11        Reports with Confidential Information

 

Reports appearing in this section of the Business Paper are confidential in their entirety or contain confidential information in attachments.

 

The confidential information has been circulated separately.

 

ITEM                                                                                                                                    PAGE #

 

C1218(1) Item 43     Organics Processing Tender                                                              1107

C1218(1) Item 44     Council Approval of the Licence of Leichhardt Oval No.1 to Sydney Football Club Pty Ltd

C1218(1) Item 45     120C Old Canterbury Road, Summer Hill - VPA

C1218(1) Item 46     Land & Property Strategy Initiatives                                                   1111

 

Late Items

 

C1218(1) Item 47     Appointment of External Member to Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC)

 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

 

Minutes of Ordinary Council Meeting held on 27 November 2018

 

Meeting commenced at  6.34 pm

 

 

 

Present:

Darcy Byrne

Victor Macri

Marghanita Da Cruz Mark Drury

Lucille McKenna OAM

Colin Hesse

Sam Iskandar

Tom Kiat

Pauline Lockie

Julie Passas

Rochelle Porteous

Vittoria Raciti

John Stamolis

Louise Steer

Anna York
Rik Hart

Elizabeth Richardson

Mayor

Deputy Mayor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor (6.41pm)

Councillor (6.37pm)

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor

Councillor (6.59pm)

General Manager

Deputy General Manager Assets and Environment

Michael Tzimoulas

Deputy General Manager Chief Financial and Administration Officer

John Warburton

Deputy General Manager Community and Engagement

Nellette Kettle

 

Annette Morgan

Cathy Edwards-Davis

Gwilym Griffiths

Joe Strati

Prue Foreman

Wal Petschler

David Birds

Ian Naylor

Katherine Paixao

Group Manager Civic and Executive Support, Integration,

Customer Service and Business Excellence

Group Manager Children and Family Services

Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

Urban Forest Manager,

Group Manager Legal

Engagement Manager

Group Manager Roads & Stormwater

Group Manager Strategic Planning

Manager Civic and Executive Support

Business Paper Coordinator

 

 

APOLOGIES:                                                 Nil

 

 

DISCLOSURES OF INTERESTS:               Nil

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES:

 

Motion: (Stamolis/Macri)

 

THAT the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on Tuesday, 30 October and Tuesday, 13 November 2018 be confirmed as a correct record.

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

C1118(2) Item 29       Mayoral Minute: Supporting Bhutanese Twins Dawa and Nima           Pelden

Motion: (Byrne)

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Provide a donation of $500 from the Mayor’s charitable fund to the Children First Foundation charity appeal to support Bhutanese twins Dawa and Nima who were surgically separated in Melbourne earlier this month; and

2.   Encourage other local governments to make a similar contribution.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:                    Nil

 

Councillor Porteous entered the Meeting at 6:37 pm.

Councillor Passas entered the Meeting at 6:41 pm.

Councillor York entered the Meeting at 6.59 pm.

 

C1118(2) Item 30       Mayoral Minute: Globe Wilkins Preschool EOI

Motion: (Byrne)

 

THAT Council:

1.   Welcome the announcement by the Member for Summer Hill, Jo Haylen, and the NSW Opposition that if elected to Government they would fund the construction of new premises for Globe Preschool within the Wilkins Public School site, noting that this is a real solution that would save the award winning preschool, while addressing the school community's need for additional classroom space; 

2.   Note that:

a.   The EOI put out by DET for construction of a pre-school in the grounds of the Wilkins School is a blatant attempt at cost shifting of responsibility for school infrastructure from the Department of Education and Training to Inner West ratepayers;

b.   Preschool education is a state government responsibility; however the operation of Globe Wilkins has always been a partnership between Council and the NSW Government. This successful partnership has been based on Council funding the entirety of recurrent costs of the service, which totaled several hundred thousand dollars in 2017/18, and the Government providing premises;

c.   The NSW Government has established a $6 billion fund to pay for school infrastructure but that despite this not a single school in the Inner West Local Government Area has been allocated funding for a major upgrade in this year’s Budget or in the forward estimates;

 

 

 

d.   That the recently released Local Government NSW report into cost shifting found that the Inner West Council is already amongst the most detrimentally impacted by state government cost shifting, with more than $18 million in state government costs having been imposed on ratepayers in 2015/16; and

e.   The extraordinarily brief time limit and conditions proposed through the EOI are extremely poor practice, with the normal period for a tender process of complexity at least 21 days.

3.   Write to the NSW Minister for Education calling on him to match the Opposition’s commitment to fund the construction of new premises for Globe Wilkins Preschool, and expressing our disappointment and anger that he has failed to reply at all to Council’s request for constructive negotiations over the future of Globe Wilkins;

4.   Submit an expression of interest for the operation of Globe Wilkins based on the following principles:

a.   An ongoing commitment to operation of the award winning service, including maintenance of the high services standards, currently costing several hundred thousand dollars per annum, being Council’s contribution to project;

b.   The Government providing increased classroom space for the School and appropriate indoor and outdoor space for Globe Wilkins through an upgrade to be funded through the $6 billion education infrastructure fund; and

c.   Seeking cooperation from the Government in implementing an interim plan to maintain enrollment levels in 2019 and for the duration of the construction of the new facility.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

 

Matter Arsing - Globe Wilkins Preschool

 

Motion: (Macri/Passas)

 

THAT:

1.     

a)    The lease by KU of the Council owned childcare facility at 53 Malakoff Street is currently operating on a monthly holdover;

 

b)    The Globe Wilkins Pre-School is earmarked to shut at the end of 2019;and

 

c)    The childcare centre erected by Council at Steel Park is as yet unallocated.

 

2.    Council receive a report which identifies the operational and financial feasibility of KU moving to the Steel Park facility and Globe Wilkins operating out of the Malakoff Street premises; and

 

 

3.    In preparing such report, Council is to initiate discussions with KU regarding its appetite for such an arrangement and include the outcomes of such discussion in the report.  

 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Macri, Passas and Raciti

Against Motion:                    Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, McKenna                                              OAM, Porteous, Stamolis, Steer and York

 

Suspension of Standing Orders

 

Motion: (Byrne/Passas)

 

THAT Council Suspend Standing Orders to hear from the registered speakers.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

 

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

8.05pm - The Mayor, Clr Byrne adjourned the meeting for a short recess.

8.11pm– The Mayor, Clr Byrne resumed the meeting.

 

Suspension of Standing Orders

 

Motion: (Byrne/Stamolis)

 

THAT Council further Suspend Standing Orders to deal with items that had registered speakers.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr York

 

Councillor York re-entered the meeting at 8.19pm

 

C1118(2) Item 6  Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy

Motion: (Drury/Macri)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council adopt the Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy and  Acknowledge that this policy also applies to relevant district  or regional sporting associations;

 

  1. The 46 Clubs currently utilising sporting grounds in the Inner West be advised by email that the Sporting Grounds Allocation Policy has been adopted;

 

  1. Council rescind the Sports Ground Allocation Policy of the former Marrickville Council;

 

 

  1. Council include the following additional clause in the Sporting Ground Allocation Policy:

 

            Maximise Use of the Sporting Grounds

 

Council has an objective to promote participation in active sport, physical activity and social connectedness.  Therefore, within the constraints imposed by Plans of Management and acceptable wear and tear on the grounds, Council wishes to maximise use of the Sporting Grounds.  Where it can be demonstrated that a Club has repeatedly booked a ground and not utilised the allocation, staff will investigate this.  At its absolute discretion, Council staff may cancel the hirer’s future allocations for the season.  Further, Council may consider excluding an applicant from future season allocations.

 

  1. Council amend clause 11 of the Sporting Ground Allocation Policy to:

 

“Other than where a contribution has been made in accordance with Section 6.10, should Council obtain new or upgraded sporting grounds (where the hours of use is substantially increased), access to these new facilities will be via a public, open, advertised Expression of Interest.”

 

  1. Council amend the words in the policy regarding the summer and winter season allocation to:

 

Summer Season Allocation

An allocation to a hirer to utilise a Council sporting ground and/or facility at agreed times between the period of the third Tuesday in September to the last Sunday in March (subject to maintenance needs).*

 

Winter Season Allocation

An allocation to a hirer to utilise a Council sporting ground and/or facility at agreed times between the period of the first Tuesday in April to the last Sunday in August (subject to maintenance needs).  Training (only) may continue to the second Friday in September (subject to maintenance needs).*

 

* Council acknowledges that all sporting codes are subject to season overlap of the above season allocation dates. Winter sports may commence pre-season training and trial games in March if sports such as cricket and baseball do not need to use their allocated sporting ground for training or finals games through to the end of March. This can be negotiated with Council and the individual clubs that share a ground in different seasons. Similarly, access to the grounds for special competitions (eg. Champion of Champions) will be negotiated on an as needs basis. All clubs in both seasons are asked to advise Council if a ground can be handed back earlier for the seasonal sporting ground changeover (eg) goal posts out and cricket wicket preparation.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

 

Councillor York left the Meeting at 8:22 pm.

 

 

 

 

C1118(2) Item 5  Draft Tree DCP - Endorsement for Exhibition

Motion: (Macri/Passas)

 

THAT:

 

1.         Council resolve to publicly exhibit the draft Tree Management Development             Control Plan for the Inner West, as detailed in ATTACHMENT 2 of this report, for            a period of 28 days, to replace the existing tree management controls contained       in:

i.      the Comprehensive Inner West Development Control Plan 2016 for Ashbury, Ashfield, Croydon, Croydon Park, Haberfield, Hurlstone Park and Summer Hill;

ii.     Leichhardt Development Control Plan 2013; and

iii.    Marrickville Development Control Plan 2011.

 

2.         The results of the public exhibition and community engagement process are           presented to Council along with a final Tree DCP for adoption;

 

3.          When the policy comes back off public exhibition, a summary of which options       identified in the discussion paper have been included and excluded in the draft     DCP policy be provided; and

 

4.          A plain english language explanation of the policy be provided in the post    exhibition report.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr York

 

Councillor York returned to the Meeting at 8:38 pm.

Councillor Passas left the Meeting at 8:39 pm.

 

C1118(2) Item 12       Classification of Crown Lands and Prioritisation of Park Plans of       Management

Motion: (McKenna OAM/Macri)

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Endorse the prioritised list of Park Plans of Management (Attachment 1) which are to be prepared for open space under its care, control and management;

 

2.   Note the list of Crown Lands which are to be managed by Council and endorse the initial categorisations of community land which are to be sent to the NSW Government for approval (Attachment 2);

 

3.   Write to the NSW Minister of Primary Industries and seek additional funding of $100,000 to support the preparation of park Plans of Management for Crown Land under its care and management; and

 

4.   Write to the NSW Minister of Primary Industries requesting that the NSW Government amend the timeframe for Plans of Management delivery, as they apply to Crown Lands, from three years to six years.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

Amendment (Stamolis/Porteous)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council review the Plan of Management (POM) for Propeller Park in this financial year; and

 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Raciti and York

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

 

  1. Fines on residents in regard to dogs off leash cease in the southern end of Propeller Park until the Plan of Management (POM) is finalised.

 

The Mayor ruled point two of the amendment Out of Order as Council cannot direct staff in operational matters.

 

Amendment (Da Cruz/Porteous)

 

That:

 

  1. Johnson Park Plan of Management be brought forward in the list; and

 

  1. Douglas Grant Park, Badu Park and Chester Street pocket parks be brought forward in the list.

 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Raciti and York

Absent:                        Cr Passas

 

Councillor Passas returned to the Meeting at 8:52 pm.

 

 

C1118(2) Item 21       Complaints Handling Policy

Motion: (Da Cruz/Kiat)

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Adopt the amended Complaints Handling policy shown as Attachment 1 incorporating six monthly report on complaint statistics to be published on website;

 

2.   Receive a six monthly report summarising the types of complaints received and actions to address issues identified;  and

 

3.   Rescind the below legacy policies of the former Ashfield, Marrickville and Leichhardt councils:

-     Customer Complaints Policy (Ashfield);

-     Service Complaints Policy (Leichhardt); and

-     Council Complaint Management Policy (Marrickville).

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

 

C1118(2) Item 25       Notice of Motion: Bring Council Meetings Back to the   Community

Motion: (Stamolis/Hesse)

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes that Ashfield Council Chambers is very difficult for many residents to access in order to participate in Council Meetings; and

 

  1. Bring a report to February 2019 Council Meeting with proposals in improving the accessibility of Council Meetings for all Inner West Council residents.

 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Hesse, Lockie, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar, Kiat, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Raciti and York

 

Matter Arising - Fire Safety at Petersham Service Centre

 

Motion: (Kiat/Drury)

 

THAT Council receive a report on the fire safety at Petersham Council Chambers at Petersham Service Centre in relation to current uses and possible future uses including large community meetings.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:                    Nil

 

 

C1118(2) Item 26       Greenway Delivery Project Management and Engagement Plan

Motion: (Drury/Byrne)

 

THAT:

 

1.   The report be noted;

 

2.   Council’s Communications team have responsibility for and management of all branding and communications relating to the Greenway project; and

 

3.    The existing Greenway logo be replaced by the Inner West Council logo in all  Council communications published on the website or to materials distributed to  residents .

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Cr Porteous

 

Amendment (Da Cruz)

 

THAT the Plan of Management for Johnson Park be brought forward in the list.

 

This Amendment lapsed for want of Seconder.

 

C1118(2) Item 27       Request for Reimbursement of Legal Expenses

Motion: (Byrne/Macri)

 

THAT the costs not be reimbursed and that the matters raised in the tabled document be referred to the Internal Ombudsman to review.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Raciti and York

Against Motion:          Crs Da Cruz, Hesse, Kiat, Lockie, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

 

Foreshadowed Motion: (Porteous)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council determines not to reimburse legal costs of Councillor Passas; and

 

  1. Should there be any code of conduct issues that a Councillor wishes to raise, they go through the proper processes to lodge such.

 

This Foreshadowed Motion lapsed.

 

Resumption of Standing Orders

 

Motion: (Byrne/McKenna OAM)

 

THAT Standing Orders be resumed.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

 

Councillor Passas left the Meeting at 10:01 pm.

Councillor Iskandar left the Meeting at 10:02 pm.

Councillor Hesse left the Meeting at 10:02 pm.

 

C1118(2) Item 1  Future of White Bay Cruise Ship Terminal Bus Service

Motion: (Stamolis/Byrne)

 

THAT Council notes the information outlined in this report.

 

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Hesse, Iskandar and Passas

 

C1118(2) Item 2  Enterprise Bargaining Agreement

Motion: (Byrne/McKenna OAM)

 

THAT Council receive and note this report.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Crs Hesse, Iskandar and Passas

 

Councillor Iskandar returned to the Meeting at 10:05 pm.

 

C1118(2) Item 3  Council Meeting Schedule for 2019

Motion: (Porteous/Da Cruz)

 

THAT:

 

  1. Council adopt the Council Meeting Schedule for 2019 as detailed in the report, subject to changing the date of the Ordinary Council Meeting from Tuesday 23 April to Tuesday 30 April; and

 

  1. In 2019 at least 2 Council Meetings are held in either Leichhardt Council Chambers or Leichhardt Town Hall. 

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Kiat, Lockie, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Crs Byrne, Drury, Iskandar, Macri, McKenna OAM, Raciti and York

Absent:                        Crs Hesse and Passas

 

Foreshadowed Motion: (Byrne/Drury)

 

THAT Council:

 

1.         Council adopt the Council Meeting Schedule for 2019 as detailed in the report, subject to changing the date of the Ordinary Council Meeting from Tuesday 23 April to Tuesday 30 April; and

 

2.       Publicise the Schedule on Council’s website, at Council’s Service Centres and on the Inner West Council page in the Inner West Courier.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Crs Hesse, and Passas

 

 

 

 

C1118(2) Item 4  Quarterly update on Tenders awarded

Motion: (Byrne/Stamolis)

 

THAT information on tenders awarded by the General Manager be received and noted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Crs Hesse and Passas

 

Councillor Hesse returned to the Meeting at 10:09 pm.

Councillor Drury left the Meeting at 10:10 pm.

Councillor Drury returned to the Meeting at 10:13 pm.

 

C1118(2) Item 7  Events in Parks Policy

Motion: (McKenna OAM/Byrne)

 

THAT:

 

1.   Council adopt the Events in Parks Policy;

 

2.   The known Event Organisers who currently manage events in Inner West parks be advised that the Policy commences on 1 January 2019;

 

3.   Council rescind the Event Management Manual of the Leichhardt Council; and

 

4.   Council receive a report back on the proposal to negotiate with Athletics Australia and that there be no progress In entering into an agreement with them as outlined until this report is considered.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Raciti, Stamolis, Steer and York

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Cr Passas

 

Councillor Passas returned to the Meeting at 10:17 pm.

Councillor Porteous left the Meeting at 10:17 pm.

Councillor York retired from the Meeting at 10:18 pm.

Councillor Hesse left the Meeting at 10:19 pm.

 

C1118(2) Item 8  Results - Community Satisfaction Research 2018

Motion: (Drury/McKenna OAM)

 

THAT Council receive and note the report.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Hesse, Porteous and York

 

Councillor Hesse returned to the Meeting at 10:25 pm.

C1118(2) Item 9  Local Democracy Update

Motion: (Byrne/Drury)

 

THAT Council:

 

1.       Receive and note the report;

 

2.       Replace the previously adopted Safety working group with the twice-yearly Local Safety Forums adopted by Council (C0718 item 1);

 

3.       Merge the previously adopted Cooks River and Parramatta River working groups to form the River Catchments working group;

 

4.         Note the inaugural combined meeting of the new Local Democracy Groups scheduled for Thursday, 29 November 2018 at Ashfield Town Hall; and

 

5.         Invite Co.As.It, Metro Assist, Chinese and Australian Social Services and the Ethnic Communities Council of NSW to work with Council to convene and host an Inner West Multicultural Inter-agency to meet quarterly for information sharing policy development purposes.  

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Cr Hesse

Absent:                        Crs Porteous and York

 

C1118(2) Item 10       Audited Financial Reports as at 30 June 2018

Motion: (McKenna OAM/Steer)

 

THAT:

 

1.    Receives and notes the report; and

 

2.   Receives the final audited reports for the Inner West Council for the reporting period ending 30 June 2017 (ATTACHMENT 1). 

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Crs Porteous and York

 

C1118(2) Item 11       Inner West Council Annual Report 2017/18

Motion: (McKenna OAM/Steer)

 

THAT Council receives and notes the Annual Report 2017/18.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Raciti, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Porteous and York

 

Councillor Porteous returned to the Meeting at 10:33 pm.

Councillor Raciti retired from the Meeting at 10:34 pm.

Councillor Passas left the Meeting at 10:35 pm.

 

C1118(2) Item 13       Heritage Pub Protections Update

Motion: (Byrne/Macri)

 

THAT Council:

 

  1. Note the cultural, social and architectural, heritage significance of the Vic on the Park Hotel and the fact that it is not located in a heritage conservation area and is not a listed heritage item;

 

  1. Begin investigations, as soon as resources or in kind assistance from an academic or other institution become available, to establish the planning justifications for the Vic on the Park Hotel to be heritage listed;

 

  1. Officers provide initial advice on which of the hotels located in heritage conservation areas but not listed as heritage items should be prioritised for consideration for listing, based on known architectural, social and cultural heritage value;

 

  1. Convene, in conjunction with respected local hotel proprietors, licensees, music venue operators local business and hospitality sector representatives, and planning experts, hold a public forum in Balmain on the future of the night time economy;

 

  1. Write officially to the academic institutions listed in the report seeking their assistance in progressing the heritage listing of identified historic hotels; and

 

  1. Clarify whether the historic name of pubs can be mandated and preserved through council controls.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Passas, Raciti and York

 

C1118(2) Item 14       Proposed Expansion of Longitude Building, 36 James Craig    Road, Rozelle

Motion: (Byrne/Porteous)

 

THAT Council:

 

1.    Writes to the local State and Federal Members of Parliament, Minister for Planning and Minister for Heritage to state its strong opposition to any proposal to increase the height of the building due to the unacceptable heritage, visual and other impacts; and

 

2.   Forwards this report to the Department of Planning and Environment, to identify key issues and to inform the preparation of the Secretary’s Environmental Assessment Requirements.

 

 

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                                  Crs Passas, Raciti and York

 

C1118(2) Item 15       Proposed Compliance & Enforcement Levy

Motion: (Byrne/Drury)

 

THAT the matter be deferred pending advice from staff on how the cost burden can be redistributed away from owner occupiers.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Passas, Raciti and York

 

C1118(2) Item 16       Abandoned Shopping Trolley Policy and Protocol

Motion: (McKenna OAM/Byrne)

 

THAT:

 

1.   The draft Impounding Policy (Shopping Trolleys) be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days;

 

2.   The results of the public exhibition are presented to Council along with a final Impounding Policy (Shopping Trolleys) for adoption;

 

3.    The Impounding (Shopping Trolleys) Protocol be received and noted;

 

4.    Council amend the protocol/policy to include solutions to prevent our streets being littered with abandoned shopping trolleys;

 

5.    Council officers identify the problem areas and develop strategies for resolving the issues of the specific areas and report this back to Council; and

6.    All Development applications for Supermarkets, bottle shops and other retail outlets using trolleys (fruit shops, nurseries etc) to have a trolley containment system  as a condition of consent.

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Passas, Raciti and York

 

Councillor Passas returned to the Meeting at 10:49 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extension of Time

 

Motion: Drury/McKenna OAM)

 

THAT the meeting be extended until 11.30pm.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

 

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT Items 17,18,19,20,22 and 23 be moved en bloc subject to an additional point in Item 18 being inserted ‘Council receive a report back on the works associated on the projects funded by VPAs being Marrickville Hospital Site, 14 McGill Street Lewisham, 429-449 New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill’ and the recommendations contained in the reports be adopted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

C1118(2) Item 17       Draft Inner West Council Asbestos Policy

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT:

 

1.       The draft Inner West Council Asbestos Policy be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days; and

 

2.       The results of the public exhibition are presented to Council along with a final Inner West Council Asbestos Policy for adoption

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

C1118(2) Item 18       2018/19 First Quarter Budget Review.

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT:

 

1.       The report be received and noted;

2.       Council approves the budget adjustments required; and

3.       Council receive a report back on the works associated on the projects funded by VPAs being Marrickville Hospital Site, 14 McGill Street Lewisham, 429-449 New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

 

C1118(2) Item 19       Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 6 November 2018

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT the Minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 6 November 2018 be received and the recommendations be adopted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

 

C1118(2) Item 20       Inner West Local Planning Panel Update

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT the report be received and noted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

C1118(2) Item 22       Status of Legal Proceedings

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT the Report be received and noted.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

C1118(2) Item 23       Investment Report as at 31 October 2018

Motion: (Macri/Iskandar)

 

THAT the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Passas, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Raciti and York

 

 

C1118(2) Item 24       Notice of Motion: Save Globe Preschool - EOI and Contingency          Fund

Councillor Kiat withdrew this Motion.

 

 

Confidential Session

 

Motion: (Byrne/Drury)

 

THAT Council move into Confidential session to consider Items of business containing Confidential Information.

 

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Passas, Raciti and York

 

Members of the public were asked to leave the Chamber.

 

Motion: (Byrne/Drury)

 

THAT Council return to open session to read out the recommendations from the

Closed Session.

 

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Passas, Raciti and York

 

The Mayor read out to the Meeting the recommendation from the Closed Session of

Council.

 

Councillor Passas retired from the Meeting at 11:05 pm.

 

Reports with Confidential Information

 

C1118(2) Item 28       Mayoral Minute: Extension of Outgoing General Manager        Contract to Align with Incoming Chief Executive Officer          Commencement

Motion: (Byrne/Drury)

 

THAT Council extend the employment contract of the current General Manager to

1 March 2019 to enable a handover to the incoming CEO.

 

For Motion:                 Crs Byrne, Da Cruz, Drury, Hesse, Iskandar, Kiat, Lockie, Macri, McKenna OAM, Porteous, Stamolis and Steer

Against Motion:          Nil

Absent:                        Crs Passas, Raciti and York

 

Urgency Motion – Addison Road Site

 

Councillor Da requested that the meeting consider an Urgency Motion with regards to  Orders issued to the Addison Road Site.

 

Motion: (Da Cruz)

 

THAT the motion be considered as a matter of urgency.

 

The Motion Lapsed for want of Seconder.

 

 

Meeting closed at 11.16pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Speakers:

 

 

Item #

 

Speaker                     

Suburb

Item 5:

Mr Kostas

Nil

Item 6:

Ross Martin

Dulwich Hill

Item 12:

Annette Mayne

South Hurstville

Item 21:

Jonathan Bolton

Annandale

Item 25:

John Lozano

Haberfield

Item 26:

Jo Blackman

Alex Lofts

Dulwich Hill

Summer Hill

Item 27:

Lila Tillman

John Lozano

Summer Hill

Haberfield

Item 30:

Kathryn Greguric

Christopher O'Carrigan

Jemma McGirr

Hurlstone Park

Springwood

Petersham

 

 

 

 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 1

Subject:         Code of Conduct Complaints Statistic Report           

Prepared By:     Suellen Bullock - Internal Ombudsman 

Authorised By:  Rik Hart - Interim General Manager

 

SUMMARY

To provide Council with a report on Model Code of Conduct Complaint Statistics as required by the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council receive and note the report on the statistical data about Code of Conduct complaints relating to Councillors and the General Manager, and, that as required by the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW, a statistical report has been provided to the Office of Local Government for the 12 months ending 31 August 2018.

 

 

BACKGROUND

Part 12 of the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW requires that Council’s Complaints Coordinator must report annually to the Council and to the Office of Local Government on a range of complaint statistics within three months of the end of each September. The prescribed annual reporting period is from 01 September to 31 August each year. The Internal Ombudsman, Suellen Bullock, and Assistant Internal Ombudsman, Rodney O’Donahue, are Complaints Coordinators for Inner West Council. Under the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW, the requisite reporting relates to complaints about Councillors and the General Manager only, and not about other Council staff.

 

REPORT

As required by the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW, the following information is provided to Council and has also been provided to the Office of Local Government for the reporting period of 01 September 2017 to 31 August 2018.

a)   the total number of Code of Conduct complaints made about Councillors and the General Manager under the Code of Conduct in the year to September

There were ten (10) Code of Conduct complaints made against Councillors and no Code of Conduct complaints against the General Manager. It is important to note that two different complainants each made complaints about three individual Councillors and the conduct reviewer made a different determination in relation to each of the Councillors, the subject of the complaints. Advice from the Office of Local Government’s Performance Team is that in circumstances where there was one complainant complaining about, for example, three different Councillors, with different preliminary assessment outcomes being determined by the conduct reviewer, then this should be considered to be three separate Code of Conduct complaints.

 

b)   the number of Code of Conduct complaints referred to a conduct reviewer

There were eight (8) Code of Conduct complaints referred to a conduct reviewer for preliminary assessment. There were an additional two (2) complaints which were not referred to a conduct reviewer but were resolved by alternative means at the outset by the General Manager.

 

c)   the number of Code of Conduct complaints finalised by a conduct reviewer at the preliminary assessment stage and the outcome of those complaints

There were five (5) Code of Conduct complaints finalised at the preliminary assessment stage. Of these five (5) complaints, the conduct reviewer determined that three (3) complaints resulted in a determination that no action be taken. Two (2) complaints were resolved by the conduct reviewer dealing with them by alternative and appropriate means including informal discussion and explanation.

d)   the number of Code of Conduct complaints investigated by a conduct reviewer

During the reporting period, one (1) complaint has been referred for a formal investigation following a preliminary assessment. This investigation is ongoing at the time of reporting.

 

e)   the number of Code of Conduct complaints investigated by a conduct review committee

There have been no Code of Conduct complaints referred to or investigated by a conduct review committee.

 

f)    without identifying particular matters, the outcome of Code of Conduct complaints investigated by a conduct reviewer or conduct review committee under these procedures

As there have been no matters investigated by a conduct reviewer or a conduct review committee, there are no outcomes to report.

 

g)   the number of matters reviewed by the Division and, without identifying particular matters, the outcome of the reviews

As a result of preliminary assessments by a conduct reviewer, two complaints were referred to the Division for consideration. At the time of reporting, no outcome has been advised by the Division.

 

h)   The total cost of dealing with Code of Conduct complaints made about Councillors and the general manager in the year to September, including staff costs.

 

The total cost of dealing with Code of Conduct complaints is $18,139.00.

Confidentiality

Clause 13.1 of the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW requires that information about Code of Conduct complaints and their management and investigation, is to be treated as confidential and is not to be publicly disclosed except as may be otherwise specifically required or permitted under the Procedures.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Nil.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Nil.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Nil.

 

CONCLUSION

As required, the statistical data has been reported to Council and also submitted to the Office of Local Government. By providing this report, Council is notifying publicly the number, type, cost and progress on Code of Conduct complaints relating to Councillors and the General Manager.

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 2

Subject:         Internal Ombudsman Shared Service Annual Report 2017-2018           

Prepared By:     Suellen Bullock - Internal Ombudsman  

Authorised By:  Rik Hart - Interim General Manager

 

SUMMARY

To present to Council the first Annual Report of the Internal Ombudsman Shared Service (IOSS), which provides information about the work of the IOSS during its first year of operation. The IOSS Annual Report is a part of the IOSS’s accountability mechanisms.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council receive and note the IOSS Annual Report 2017-2018.

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

The IOSS was established on 25 September 2017 with the aim, as detailed in the IOSS Governance Charter, of providing “residents, community members, ratepayers, ;local businesses, staff, Councillors with an ‘independent ear’ regarding complaints about administrative conduct; unethical behaviour by Council; corrupt conduct; misconduct; or maladministration.” The IOSS also has a mandate to provide training for staff and to undertake preventative work to foster good administrative conduct and strive for a corruption-free organisation. The IOSS is required under its Governance Charter to report quarterly to the IOSS Management Committee (the two General Managers of Cumberland and Inner West Councils and the Chief Executive Officer of City of Parramatta Council) as part of its accountability and transparency responsibilities. While there is no formal requirement for the IOSS to provide an Annual Report, the Internal Ombudsman considers it fundamental to good governance and accountability, that each of the member Councillors are provided with information about the function of the IOSS each year and especially after its inaugural year.

 

The IOSS Annual Report contains information about: the year in review, 2017-2018; key achievements; complaint statistics; activities in relation to training; preventative measures; financial management; stakeholder engagement; and future directions.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this IOSS Annual Report.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

The IOSS Management Committee has instituted a requirement that prior to an IOSS Annual Report being presented to Council, it must first be endorsed by Council’s Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC), following which it is presented to the Council. The IOSS Management Committee further resolved that once the IOSS Annual Report has been endorsed by the ARIC and presented to Council, then it must be uploaded to each Council’s website and intranet.

 

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

The IOSS Annual Report was considered and endorsed by Council’s ARIC on 28 November 2018. The feedback from all ARIC members was both positive and supportive of the IOSS and the important role it plays within Inner West Council.

 

Once the IOSS Annual Report has been presented to Council, then the Annual Report will be available on the Council’s website and intranet.

 

 

CONCLUSION

It is important for Councillors to not only understand and be informed about the various activities and benefits associated with the work of the Internal Ombudsman Shared Service with Inner West Council, but also to learn of the work with the other member Councils of Cumberland and City of Parramatta.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Internal Ombudsman Shared Service Annual Report 2017-2018

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 3

Subject:         Change in Parking Meter Operational Hours in the side streets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain
           

Prepared By:     Manod Wickramasinghe - Coordinator – Traffic and Parking Services 

Authorised By:  Wal Petschler - Group Manager Footpaths, Roads, Traffic and Stormwater

 

SUMMARY

Council at its meeting held 11 September 2018, considered a report on the results of the investigation into altering the parking meter operational hours and introducing 30min free parking into the side streets of Balmain, Rozelle and Leichhardt and requested that further analysis on the consultation be undertaken, and a further report investigating limiting the 30 minute free parking and turning off parking meters at 7.00pm to side street spaces in sections abutting businesses being brought back to Council.

 

This report recommends that parking meters in side streets not be switched off between 7pm and 10pm, due to:

·    Lack of resident support due to displacement of resident parking

·    Potential for motorist confusion due to changes in paid parking hours within a single street with paid parking occurring further away from the main street

·    Further decreases in parking turnover in side streets

 

It is also recommended that the 30 minute free parking not be extended into the side streets to limit shopper parking in residential side streets throughout operating hours of the parking meters.  However, in order to provide consistency in the free parking tickets issued, it is recommended that the existing 15 minute parking ticket zones (11 parking meters) be converted to 30 minute free parking zones.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.       This report be received and noted; and

 

2.       Existing 15 minute free parking zones (11 parking meters) be converted to 30 minute free parking zones.

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

At its meeting held 12 October 2017, Council committed to a policy of turning off parking meters in the former Leichhardt Municipality at 7pm and requested a detailed report on the policy’s cost, funding and implementation.  At the Council meeting held 13 March 2018, Council resolved that the parking meters on the mainstreets within the former Leichhardt Municipality would be turned off at 7pm and to engage with the community on switching the side street parking meters off at 7pm in addition to extending the 30 minute free parking to the side streets.

 

Community engagement was completed on this proposal and showed that 61% of respondents supported turning off side street meters at 7:00pm and 69% of respondents supported extending 30 minute free parking to the meters in the side streets.  However, it was clear from the comments received that the objections are primarily from residents who are concerned that switching the meters off at 7pm and introducing 30 minute free parking tickets to the side streets would increase demand for parking in the residential areas and displace resident parking.

 

The results of the investigation including community consultation results were reported to the Council Meeting held Tuesday, 11 September 2018.  Council subsequently resolved:

 

THAT:

 

1.   Council defer this matter to allow Council officers to investigate limiting 30 minute free parking and turning off parking meters at 7.00pm to side street spaces and abutting businesses; and

2.   Further information be provided on the breakdown of submissions from residents of relevant side streets.

 

Side street spaces adjacent to businesses

 

The sections of side streets adjacent/abutting businesses in Balmain, Rozelle and Leichhardt have been identified and are shown on the following three plans.

 

Identified sections of side streets adjacent to businesses in Balmain

 

Identified sections of side streets adjacent to businesses in Rozelle

 

Identified sections of side streets adjacent to businesses in Leichhardt

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

In the 2018/19 financial year, Council budgeted to receive $3,896,000 revenue from its parking meter management strategies following the reduction in operating hours of main street parking meters in Leichhardt, Balmain and Rozelle.

 

 a)   Turning off parking meters at 7pm (in sections of side streets adjacent to businesses)

 

The potential revenue losses associated with proposed meter changes have been estimated by analysing individual parking meter transactions and parking related infringement notices over a 3-month period and extrapolating potential losses over a year.

 

The modelling previously presented to the March 2018 Council Meeting has been updated to only consider meters in the identified sections of side streets adjacent to businesses and is shown in the following table.

 

 

 

Side Streets

Estimated Meter Revenue

$116,000

Potential Lost Fine Revenue

$26,000

Total

$142,000

 

A one-time additional cost of approximately $8,000 would be required to re-program parking meters, change tariff labels, supply and install new signage.

 

This matter would also require Traffic Committee approval to alter regulatory signage in the side streets.

 

b)    Extension of 30 minute free parking into the side streets

 

The potential parking meter revenue loss of extending 30-minute free tickets into the identified sections of side streets has been estimated by analysing short term parking transactions in side-streets over a 3-month period and extrapolating potential losses over a year.

 

Based on current usage this modelling indicates that introducing 30 minute free parking into the side streets is expected to result in a parking meter revenue loss of approximately  $64,000.  This potential loss will increase if motorist behaviour changes to make further use of the free parking.

 

Previous study into the introduction of 30 minute free parking into the main-streets indicated there was no overall decrease in the number of meter related fines in 2012/13.  This may have resulted as a consequence of increased enforcement consistent with the findings of the previous parking study which identified that enforcement needed to be increased in all areas to ensure parking compliance.  Approximately 75% of fines issued were for ‘not displaying a ticket’.

 

A one-time additional cost of approximately $7,000 will be required to re-program parking meters, change tariff labels and alter signage.

 

Subsequently, the total per annum cost of implementing the proposed amendments of both switching off the side street meters at 7pm and extending the 30 minute free tickets into sections of side streets adjacent to businesses is estimated at $206,000.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Parking Meter Strategy

 

Parking meters in the former Leichhardt Municipality are located in the Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain town centres and were originally installed in 2001 to better manage the high demand for, and utilisation of, parking in each business area.  The parking meters formed part of Council’s parking management strategy with objectives to:

 

·    Ensure on-street parking turnover

·    Provide improved access to on-street car parking for business customers

·    Discourage illegal / overstay parking

·    Discourage commuter parking

·    Encourage the use of public transport.

 

A number of nearby Councils in Sydney operate parking meter schemes including; City of Sydney, Waverley, North Sydney and Woollahra.

This approach recognised:

 

·    There is generally a shortfall of car parking for the current mix of businesses.

·    There is very limited capacity to increase off street car parking.

·    Staff parking took up valuable parking spaces within the Town Centre parking schemes.  However in recent years, the number of business permits issued has been reduced following the introduction of a fee and more strict limits.

·    Balmain, Rozelle and Leichhardt are desirable places to visit that need an Integrated Transport Plan that focuses on a wide range of transport options, not just reliance and promotion of the motor car.

Current Parking Meter Operation

 

Existing hours of operation of the parking meters in the main streets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain now span from 8.00am to 7.00pm, 7 days per week. Parking on the main-streets requires a motorist to display a paid or a 30-minute free ticket.  There are 70 main street parking meters in Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain.

 

Existing hours of operation of the parking meters in the side streets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain span from 8.00am to 10.00pm, 7 days per week.  Parking on the side streets requires a motorist to display a paid ticket, 15-minute free ticket (only operating for 11 parking meters in locations adjacent to the mainstreets) or valid parking permit.  There are 214 side street parking meters in Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain.  Residents in the metered side streets are eligible for parking permits which provide preferential parking by exempting them from parking meter payments and time limits on the parking control signs.

 

Council introduced 30 minute free, ticketed parking along the main-streets of these suburbs to allow for short term parking to access businesses.  This initiative has been popular and usage of the 30 minute free ticketed parking continues to increase.  Between 2013 and 2017, the issue of paid parking tickets on main-streets has decreased from approximately 25,000 tickets per month to 19,000 whilst free parking tickets has increased from 80,000 to 112,500 tickets per month.  The 30 minute parking represents 86% of parking tickets currently issued on main-streets.

 

Parking Management Impacts

 

(a) Turning Side Street Parking Meters off from 7pm-10pm in sections adjacent to businesses

 

Advantages include:

·    Allows additional free parking for resident visitors without requiring use of visitor parking permits

·    Allows additional free parking for shoppers on the side-streets for night-trade businesses

 

Disadvantages include:

·    Meter revenue loss is estimated at $116,000 pa based on current user behaviour and is likely to also affect fine related revenue by $26,000 pa.

·    Proposal will encourage shopper parking in side streets and this will potentially displace resident parking.

·    Creates inconsistency amongst side street parking meter restrictions which may lead to motorist confusion and resulting infringement notices.

·    A motorist can currently obtain a parking ticket from any meter in the street. When a parking meter experiences a technical issue, this allows a motorist to obtain a ticket from an adjacent meter.  Without this functionality, it is likely that a motorist may assume parking meters are not working if they attempt payment from a meter within a zone with ticket parking finishing at 7pm, although the motorist parked outside this zone in an area restricted to 10pm.

 

(b)   Extension of 30 minute free tickets to sections of side streets adjacent to businesses

 

Parking meters which issue 30 minute free parking tickets are limited to the mainstreets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain.  There are also 11 parking meters in commercially zoned side streets adjacent to the mainstreet which issue 15 minute parking tickets.  Extending the 30 minute free parking tickets to encompass all parking meters would have a number of advantages and disadvantages.

 

Advantages include:

·    Allows short term parking for resident visitors without requiring use of visitor parking permits

·    Allows short term parking for shoppers on the side-streets

·    30 minute free parking on the mainstreets has previously been shown to reduce the average length of stay for each vehicle from 51 mins (for 2P areas) to 41 mins.

 

Disadvantages include:

·    Meter revenue loss is estimated at $64,000 based on current user behaviour and may also affect fine related revenue

·    Proposal will encourage shopper parking in side streets and this will potentially displace resident parking.

·    Creates inconsistency amongst side street parking meters in the former Leichhardt LGA

 

Parking Study

 

In order to assess whether the existing parking meter fee is deterring motorists from parking in the shopping precincts, a parking study was undertaken in November 2017 to assess the usage of metered parking spaces in the shopping precincts of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain.

 

The following graphs outline the parking occupancy rates in side streets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain on a Friday and Saturday night in ticket parking areas.

 

 

 

The graphs from the current parking survey shows that parking occupancy in the side streets of Leichhardt and Balmain are very high.  It should be noted that Rozelle has only a small number of businesses which operate at night which is reflected in lower occupancy rates compared to Balmain and Leichhardt.

 

There is still a strong evening demand for parking within each of the shopping centres and this needs to continue to be managed through effective parking management strategies.

 

Altering the operational hours of any of the existing parking meters in the side streets to shut off from 7pm will likely reduce parking turnover near the mainstreets as motorists would be able to park for free from 7pm to 8am the following day.  Noting the side streets are predominantly residential, this may then displace resident parking.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Council previously engaged the local community on parking meter changes in Leichhardt, Balmain and Rozelle side streets.

The engagement was promoted through:

·    Letter distributed to residences in Balmain, Leichhardt, Rozelle, Balmain East, Birchgrove, Lilyfield, Annandale and Haberfield (total 27,300).

·    Letter distributed to businesses in Norton Street, Leichhardt and Darling Street, Balmain and Rozelle (total 1,200).

·    Letter to Leichhardt/Annandale Business Chamber and Balmain/Rozelle Chamber

·    Media release, social media

·    Council’s column in the Inner West Courier

·    Council’s enews and Your Say Inner West enews

The engagement was open from 3 April to 20 May 2018 and a total of 338 surveys responses were received.

A detailed Engagement Outcomes Report is included in Attachment 1.

A majority of respondents supported turning off meters at 7:00pm (61% of respondents) and a majority also supported extending 30 minute free parking (69% of respondents) to the meters in the side streets.

 

Further analysis of the detailed comments provided by respondents indicated that at least 109 of the 338 comments (32%) were from residents in the affected side streets of Balmain, Rozelle and Leichhardt.  Of these submissions, only 10% supported switching off parking meters at 7pm in the side streets and 28% supported extending 30min free parking into the side streets.  These results are shown in the following graphs.

 

 

 

 

Residents in the metered side streets are eligible for parking permits which provide preferential parking by exempting them from parking meter payments and time limits on the parking control signs.

 

These residents have commented that parking levels in the side streets are already at capacity and by removing the ticket parking restrictions at 7pm, residents would have to compete with visitors/shoppers for the remaining parking spaces.

 

Those who support the proposal mainly believe it will support local business, bring in visitors and help revitalise the main streets.  The two local business chambers made submissions of support which are also shown in Attachment 1.

 

It should be noted that although the current investigation limits changes to the sections of side streets adjacent to businesses, there will still be an impact on resident parking in the side streets.

 

CONCLUSION

Based on the investigation and consultation outcomes three options are presented.

·    Option A – Retain existing metered parking restrictions in Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain and alter existing 15 minute free parking zones (11 parking meters) into 30 minute free parking zones.

·    Option B – Modify operational hours of parking meters in the side streets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain adjacent to businesses to switch off at 7pm to match the current operating hours of the main street parking meters and alter existing 15 minute free parking zones (11 parking meters) into 30 minute free parking zones.

·    Option C - Modify operational hours of all parking meters in the side streets of Leichhardt, Rozelle and Balmain to switch off at 7pm to match the current operating hours of the main street parking meters and alter existing 15 minute free parking zones (11 parking meters) into 30 minute free parking zones.

It should be noted that Traffic Committee review would be required for Council’s referred option.

 

Although the community engagement showed that the majority of respondents supported turning off side street meters at 7:00pm and extending 30 minute free parking to the meters in the side streets, further analysis has shown that directly affected residents in the side streets do not support the changes due to the increased demand for parking in the residential areas and subsequent displacement of resident parking.  Although Option B limits the impact to sections of side streets adjacent to businesses, there will still be an impact on resident parking in the side streets.

 

From a parking management standpoint it is difficult to justify paid parking in side streets after 7pm whilst it remains free in the adjoining main streets.  It is however acknowledged that restricting only sections of side streets may cause further confusion to motorists and could result in motorists being fined for not paying the meter.

 

It is also acknowledged that the change in main street meter operating hours was a significant change and the resulting disruption to parking turnover is still being assessed with a further report outlining the outcomes of the review to be presented to Council in 2019.

 

It is therefore recommended that parking meters in side streets not be switched off between 7pm and 10pm, and that 30 minute free parking tickets not be extended into the side streets adjacent to businesses due to:

·    Lack of resident support due to displacement of resident parking

·    Potential for motorist confusion due to changes in paid parking hours within a single street with paid parking occurring further away from the main street

·    Further decreases in parking turnover in side streets

 

However, in order to provide consistency in the free parking tickets issued, it is recommended that the existing 15 minute parking ticket zones (11 parking meters) be converted to 30 minute free parking zones.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Engagement Outcomes Report - Parking Meters Changes - June 2018

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 4

Subject:         Aboriginal Frontier War Memorial           

Prepared By:     Deborah Lennis - Aboriginal Programs Officer 

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

On 13 February 2018, Inner West Council adopted a Mayoral Minute (C0218 Item 16): initiating consultation about an appropriate Frontier War Memorial. Inner West Council endorsed that consultation with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Strategic Reference Group, Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council and further representatives from the local community about the need, form and location of a potential Frontier War Memorial, with a report drawing from both international and national examples, as well as outlining the results of the consultation.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.       Endorse the recommendations from the Aboriginal community to reflect the story of the Aboriginal peoples survival through the erection of a series of monuments; and

 

2.       Receive a report from staff detailing how the recommendations can be implemented including scalable budgetary options that could be considered as part of council’s 19/20 budget process.

 

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

Mayoral Minute (C0218 Item 16) Initiating Consultation about an Appropriate Frontier War Memorial.

 

THAT Council:

1.   Council consult with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Strategic Reference Group, the Metro Land Council and further representatives from the local community about the need, form and location of a Frontier War memorial;

2.   A report be brought back to council outline the results of this consultation; and

3.  The report should draw from international examples and research.

 

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population of the Inner West is 1.1% of the total population. Council recognises that the engagement with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their expressions of culture and faith enrich our whole community and build inclusion across the city.

 

This report seeks to ensure that the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples participate in local decision making, including in design of a suitable location for a War Memorial acknowledging the Frontier Wars, which happened during the colonisation of this country. This report also draws from examples of memorials internationally and within Australia that have been erected across the world in the name of progress and loss of Indigenous lives whilst opening new lands (Frontier Wars).

 

In the United States, there is no national Frontier War memorial, but a National Native American Veterans Memorial is being constructed in Washington DC. The many other American Indian Memorials throughout the United States are in places of significance to the American Indian culture, history and heritage. There is a current counter movement that is gaining momentum following removal of certain Civil War statues deemed racist and this movement calls for removal of statues featuring American Indians in racist poses.

In Canada, there is public awareness of an extensive and complex history of frontier war, dispossession and genocide of the First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultures, histories, and topics across Canada including Newfoundland, Ontario, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, and Quebec. The experience of Canada’s first people in their Frontier Wars is detailed in specific permanent exhibitions within the First People’s Hall of the Canadian Museum of History. The Canadians also have a National Aboriginal Veterans Monument.

 

In South Africa, the Keiskamma Tapestry is displayed in the foyer of the National Parliament. It details the history Eastern Cape Province, including the series of conflicts known as the Frontier Wars (1779-1878). Given the history of apartheid in South Africa, the issue of genocidal violence in early Frontier Wars is not the only focus for memorialising.

 

Within Australia there are approximately 31,279 memorials with 11 being of significance to the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander peoples and the Frontier Wars. There are 3 in Victoria, 1 in both Queensland and the ACT. Within NSW the only registered ‘Frontier War Memorial’ is for the well published Appin Massacre (17th April 1816). This memorial is situated Cataract Road, Cataract Dam, Appin. Current Aboriginal Monuments within the Inner West Council Area include:

1.   Mogo's Headstone Church & Lennox Streets Camperdown Memorial Rest Park - 1931

2.   Rangers League Memorial to Aborigines Church Street Camperdown Cemetery 1950

3.   Syd (Doc) Cunningham King Street Newtown Footpath Near IGA Store 1999

4.   Ngaraka Shire for Unknown Koori Balmain Road Sydney College of the Arts

            2001    Moved to ANU Campus Canberra

5.   Stolen Generations Memorial Reilly Lane Sydenham Green Sydenham 1999

 

Through 2018, extensive discussion and engagement on the issue of the most appropriate memorialisation of Aboriginal dispossession in the Inner West and Australia more broadly considered both the naming and the actual memorial itself. Generally Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples felt that memorialising the Frontier War alone placed too much emphasis on events in the past and too little focus on memorialising the remarkable survival of Aboriginal peoples.

 

The proposal from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is that Council erects three to five monuments across the LGA that tell a story of survival of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Locations proposed include Illoura Reserve – Balmain East Yeo Park, – Ashbury and Kendrick Park – Tempe.

 

If Council supports these broad ideas, it is proposed that a detailed case be developed for Council consideration in early 2019. This might be followed by a Council announcement in NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Week which will be held from the 7 to 14 July 2019 with the theme ‘Voice, Treaty, Truth – Let’s work together for a shared future’.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The $500,000 required for the implementation of a Memorial to embrace the survival of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (over two years 2019/20 and 2020/21) would need to be sourced through the 2019/20 budget process.

 

COMMUNITY COMMENTS

Aboriginal community members provided input on the proposed Frontier War Memorial. These are summarised in the table below:

 

Issue

Response

Frontier Wars: were there any within the Inner West LGA?

Research has shown that there were only Aboriginal raids and attacks with destruction of crops and property (around the Balmain East area) within the Inner West LGA  (see appendices #1)

Designs of current ‘Frontier War Memorials’.

Research has shown that the few Aboriginal Frontier War Memorials that have been erected within Australia have a look of TOMB stone more than a memorial or artwork. (see appendices #2)

Frontier War Memorial should this be what Council is promoting?

There are large number of memorials commemorating War, is it possible to give some thought about commemorating the ‘SURVIVAL’ of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Location of a memorial (celebrating the survival of the Aboriginal peoples)

This should be not in one place but across the whole LGA that tells the story of the Aboriginal peoples survival through the colonisation of this country and particularly this LGA.

 

It is noted that the NSW Government has recently purchased the property in Putney which is said to be the final resting place of Bennelong. Further, a local group has committed to raising the $1.5 million required for a modest Frontier War Memorial on that site

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander engagement on the idea of a Frontier War Memorial was promoted through:

•           Strategic Reference Group meetings

•           Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council at a public meeting

•           Local Aboriginal community

 

CONCLUSION

Responding to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities in regards to the needs, form and location of a Frontier War Memorial. The proposed Survival Memorial priorities and formalises an approach for Council in the wider community of the LGA in understanding the shared and true history of this country.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Recorded sites of conflict during colonisation (map)

2.

Pictures of current Frontier War Memorial across Australia

3.

Concept of pictures of ideas for possible memorials

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 5

Subject:         Aboriginal Names for Inner West Council Wards           

Prepared By:     Deborah Lennis - Aboriginal Programs Officer 

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

Inner West Council resolved (C1017 Item 17) to initiate consultation about appropriate Aboriginal words for the Inner West Council wards and that consultation involve the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Strategic Reference Group, Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council and further representatives from the local Aboriginal community.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.         Notes the staff process of Aboriginal community engagement; and

 

2.         Supports the recommendations of the Aboriginal community in Naming of the Council Wards as follows:-

 

Ashfield Ward –        Djarrawunang (Magpie)

            Balmain Ward –         Baludarri (Leather Jacket)

            Leichhardt Ward –    Gulgadya (Grass Tree)

            Marrickville Ward –   Midjuburi (Lillypilly)

            Stanmore Ward –      Damun (Port Jackson Fig).

 

 

BACKGROUND

As required by Resolution C1017 Item 17, this report seeks to provide Inner West Council with Sydney Aboriginal words to help establish area names for the five wards within the Inner West Local Government Area. This report will assist the Council in determining the Aboriginal language words to rename the ‘wards’ within the LGA. It will also provide local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and community a sense of belonging to area. 

 

At the same time as responding to the Naming of the Wards Council Resolution, Council staff had commissioned a Critical Investigation Report (2018). The Critical Investigation is a key piece of research which provides the historical and cultural context and research support instrumental in providing information to help establish Ward Names, as well as being a resource for works across the LGA including Wayfinding Artworks, (funded through Straonger Community Grants) which which have been funded via SCG funding which will be installed by June 2019. The Naming Criteria and principles for determining the proposed Ward Names has reflected upon the former Leichhardt Council’s Naming of Roads, Parks, Reserves, and Public Spaces Policy.

 

Including Naming Criteria 3

(a)     where appropriate, Aboriginal names should be used;

(b)     second to (a), names embracing the LGA’s heritage and community should be used;

(c)     the proposed name reflects the character, landscape, flora or fauna, or function of the site to be named;

(d)     community support for the proposed name is required;

 

Below is a table outlining proposed words for each of the five Wards in order of preference as determined through community consultation, with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities over the past few months. Metropolitan Aboriginal Land Council and Aboriginal linguist Jackelyn Troy have also been engaged to review the proposed ward names in reflection to Sydney Aboriginal languages.

 

DISCUSSION

 

WARD

PROPOSED ABORIGINAL WORD/S

WAYFINDING ARTWORK/SCULPTURE

Balmain

1.   Leather Jacket – baludarri

2.   Black Duck – yurungay

3.   Oyster – Badangi

4.   Tea Tree – bunya

Fish Traps @ King George Park

Leichhardt

1.   Grass Tree – gulgadya

2.   Possum – wali

Grass Tree @ Hawthorn Reserve

Ashfield

1.   Magpie  – djarrawunang

2.   Bat – wirambi

3.   Wattle – wadanguli

Mural @ Cadigal Reserve (Longport Street Wall)

Marrickville

1.   Lillypilly – midjuburi

2.   Dingo – dingu (also a consolation in the Southern skies)

3.   Bark Canoe – nawi 

Bark Canoe (nawi) @ Steel Park

Stanmore

1.   Port Jackson Fig – damun

2.   Bandicoot – burraga

3.   Sulphur-crested Cockatoo – garraway

Aboriginal Seating @ Camperdown Memorial Rest Park

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The installation of Wayfinding Artworks, have been funded via SCG funding, however should Council determine to adopt the Aboriginal Wards names, then appropriate resources will need to be considered to install, physical signage and update Council’s communication strategy. This may be timely with the current review of corporate branding being undertaken.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Community Services and Culture – Wellbeing Aboriginal Programs Team and Living Arts and

Trees, Parks and Streetscapes have all participated with feedback on the proposed names.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Strategic Reference Group (former)

Critical Investigation Report (2018) – Tocomwall Pty Ltd

Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council

Jackelyn Troy – Aboriginal Linguist

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the Inner West

 

CONCLUSION

The proposed Aboriginal words have been provided following research undertaken on the culture and history of the Inner West, reflecting upon existing policy and following community consultation. The report recommends the names preferred by the Aboriginal community.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 6

Subject:         Live Music Action Plan            

Prepared By:     Freya Ververis - Arts Grants and Engagement Support Worker 

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

Council has resolved to support creative communities, and to encourage live music in the Inner West. Live Music is a vital part of the cultural fabric and identity of the Inner West. The proposed Live Music Action Plan will support existing and new live music venues and create performance opportunities and audience development for emerging and established musicians. This project will also deliver advocacy and skill sharing opportunities for musicians, live music venues, and music industry professionals therefore nurturing the future growth of creative industries and ensuring a continuing leading role for the Inner West in live music in greater Sydney.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Adopt the Live Music Action Plan;

 

2.   Adopt the draft Live Music Grant Guidelines for public exhibition; and

 

3.   Council notes the NSW Parliamentary enquiry report The Music and Arts Economy in New South Wales and calls on the NSW Government to adopt the findings.

 

 

BACKGROUND

C1017 Item 11, 31 October 2017, NOTICE OF MOTION: SUPPORTING OUR CREATIVE COMMUNITIES (Extract of relevant elements only)

2. Establish a Live Music Development Fund

Proposed as an initial $200,000 live music fund to encourage artists and venues to put on more gigs at existing live music venues, as well as establish new venues throughout the Inner West.

3. Bring arts and live music to the shop fronts, former factories, cafes and office blocks  
    of the Inner West

Including options on reforms that will allow non-residential buildings to be used as a small scale arts and live music spaces, without the need for a development application to be submitted.

Council further resolved:

 

C0518 Item 4 22 May 2018 Creative Communities and Bringing Arts and Live Music to Buildings Across the Inner West (Extract of relevant elements only)

 

THAT Council:

 

3.         Investigate a sustainable model for the creation of a Live Music/Cultural Planning Liaison Officer to be the first point of contact at Council to assist existing and proposed live music and other arts and cultural activities-related venues to navigate the planning regulation system working closely with Council’s existing Business Advisory role within the Development Advisory Team;

 

4.         Develop planning guidance sheets on small scale arts, live music and cultural activities and their permissibility within restaurants, cafes, shops and office premises; and

 

5.         Engage with our local arts, live music and cultural activities communities on the provision of a planning advice service to understand, and ensure the service addresses, their needs.

 

This report proposes The Inner West Live Music Action Plan, Attachment 1 which gives effect to:

·    Inner West Council motion C1017 Item 11 number 2 and 3

·    Inner West Council C0518 Item 4 numbers 3, 4 and 5.

 

Council officers have consulted across the sector with neighbouring Councils and key industry stakeholders in developing the Live Music Action Plan. Engagement with live music venue operators in September 2018 identified further issues and actions Council could address to support live music.

The Live Music Action Plan comprises two major initiatives:

 

1.   Working with existing live music venues to develop solutions to immediate issues and build capacity for the summer performance season:

·    Launch the Live Music Planning Liaison Service providing a face to face service offering wayfinding through the planning and development process

·    Solving issues for Council that are raised with the Live Music Planning Liaison Service

·    Providing information resources that guide proponents through the development assessment process.

 

2.   Delivering support and resources for potential new venues and musicians entering or participating in the live music economy:

·    Live Music Planning Liaison Service continues for additional venues

·    Support and information resources for potential new venues and musicians

·    Grants, education and advocacy support for musicians and venues

 

The Live Music Action Plan creates a method for Council to support existing live music venues and provide performance opportunities for emerging and established musicians across all genres, for audiences of all ages, and in venues across the city.

 

The Inner West is home to approximately 60 venues that currently offer live music in some form. There is the opportunity for expansion of live music in the Inner West amongst the existing 100 pubs and clubs, 200 small bars and breweries, 600 cafes and restaurants and 150 art galleries and other spaces. 

 

Research commissioned by the Council of Capital City Lord Mayors entitled Measuring the Australian Night Time Economy 2016-17, reported Sydney core night-time economy included 4,872 establishments, employed 35,580 people and turned over $4,059 million.

 

Unfortunately the live music industry faces a number of threats resulting in the decline of live music venues across wider Sydney in recent years.  In the Inner West threats and challenges, include rezoning of industrial lands resulting in a loss of cultural spaces that house venues, rehearsal and recording studios. Increased residential development close to cultural activity and changing expectations of residents through the process of gentrification has led to issues around noise attenuation. The increased cost of housing is pushing those who work in creative industries further away from creative infrastructure, performance opportunities and peers.

 

The City of Sydney is acting to attempt reinvigoration of its declining live music sector and late night economy. The City of Sydney has approved a new Development Control Plan to for public exhibition. It proposes changes to planning controls for late night trading and initiatives to encourage performance venues, to provide guidance on appropriate trading hours for low impact venues outside of the key precincts, and to allow additional trading hours for venues located in late night trading areas that host live performances.

 

The NSW Parliament enquiry report The Music and Arts Economy in New South Wales finds that NSW has a music venue crisis that is impacting negatively on the grassroots music scene. The report highlights threats to and the actual demise of many live music venues (particularly in the City of Sydney) and the consequences for contemporary music in NSW, including the destruction of career pathways for emerging performers, adverse effects to Sydney’s cultural reputation, and the impact of closures on the economic viability of other nearby businesses.

 

The NSW Parliamentary enquiry report makes 60 recommendations, a large number of these recommendations mirror actions in the proposed Inner West Live Music Action Plan including:

·    Advocacy and support for live music venues and musicians

·    Support in creating new venues, including establishing a single point of contact to provide assistance in navigating the development application process

·    Opportunities to better support young people to engage in music performance

·    Development of grants for live music performances and for industry support and capacity building

·    Implementing audience development and marketing

·    New live music festival support

·    Best practice guides for venues and musicians

·    Musician loading zones.

 

Relevant Inner West Council references

 

Over the past 15 years there has been a notable decline in the number of arts and live music venues throughout Sydney. As a result, the live music scene has been the subject of a number of enquiries and studies in an attempt to arrest this decline, particularly within the city and inner city areas. Vanishing Acts: An inquiry into the state of live popular music opportunities in NSW, Johnson, B & Homan, S, 2003.

 

As part of its work, the Live Music Taskforce commissioned a study of Live Music and performance listings in gig guides in Sydney street press publication, The Drum Media ( now known as The Music) that showed a 61% decline over a nine-year period. Live Music and Performance Action Plan, City of Sydney, March 2014.

 

Following the release of the City of Sydney's Live Music and Performance Action Plan, Inner West Council has undertaken a range of actions to support local Live Music and night-time economies including:

 

·    Initiating the Off Broadway plan to activate Parramatta Road by encouraging Live Music and Arts activity.

·    Participating in the Live Music Taskforce, including collaborating with the City of Sydney, Newcastle Council, Wollongong Council and City of Parramatta.

·    Collaboration with the City of Sydney on a pilot program with Music NSW and the Live Music Office, Amplify, to give local venues targeted       support with music programming.

·    The Live Music Marrickville Action Plan, 2015 included a $50,000 grants program for audience development, all ages gigs and noise abatement. Identifying an arts planning representative and the Sydenham Creative Hub initiative to activate live music and creative industries in Sydenham/ East Marrickville.

·    Parliamentary Inquiry from the Legislative Council Portfolio Committee No. 6 - Planning and Environment. The Music and Arts Economy in New South Wales. Inner West Council Evidence: 28 May 2018.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Council has allocated $200,000 for the Live Music Fund in 2018/19 financial year. The program will be evaluated with a recommendation to Council regarding ongoing financial commitment.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

There has been extensive collaboration within Council in producing the draft Live Music Action Plan.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Recent consultation includes with neighbouring Councils, industry stakeholders and sector leaders.  A specific consultation was undertaken in September 2018 through Inner West Council’s Live Music focus groups.  The findings and report of the Leichhardt and Marrickville Live Music Reference Group has informed the development of this paper.  It is proposed to exhibit both the draft Live Music Action Plan and Live Music Grant Guidelines and report back to the first Council meeting in February 2019.  

 

CONCLUSION

It is proposed that Council adopt the draft Live Music Action Plan and Live Music Grant Guidelines. The Live Music Action plan seeks to enhance the potential of the Inner West’s cultural and creative industries and ensure the sustainability of live music venues through a range of measures. 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Live Music Action Plan

2.

Live Music Grant Guidelines

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 7

Subject:         Multicultural Policy Implementation           

Prepared By:     Simon Watts - Social and Cultural Planning Manager  

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

On 13 November 2018 Council approved the Multicultural Policy and requested further advice on whether or not the proposed position Multicultural Policy Project Officer could be funded as full time. Noting funds of $113,000 have been allocated to implement the policy on an ongoing basis, this report recommends a staged implementation with additional resources in the first six months to gain momentum.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Endorse the proposed Community-led Celebration Day Grant Guidelines for exhibition;

 

2.   Approve:

 

a.   Recruiting a Multicultural Policy Project Officer position four days per week as a permanent position;  and

b.   Allocating funds for an additional day per week until 30 June 2019 to give traction to policy implementation.

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

C1118(1) Item 3 Multicultural Policy

 

THAT Council:

1. Endorse the Multicultural Policy;

2. Reallocate $113,000 in 2018/19 and subsequent financial years within the

Community Services and Culture Group to deliver the Multicultural program

priorities:

a. Employing a part time Multicultural Policy Project Officer ($84,000 per

annum);

b. Developing and delivering a multicultural small grants program enabling

community-lead celebrations of culture $29,000;

c. Initiating the Multicultural Advisory Committee commencing 29

November 2018;

d. Initiating the Inter-Faith Reference Group commencing first quarter 2019

e. Continuing translation of key Council documents into community

languages as required;

f. Developing the framework and protocols supporting community to

community relationships; and

g. Identifying a prospective Chinese city with which to form a community

to community relationship.

3. Note that the following Multicultural program priorities are not recommended to

proceed in 2018/19 and are unfunded:

a. Additional investment in expanding Lunar New Year celebrations

b. Investment in an anti-racism film competition and festival.

4. A report be brought back at the December 2018 Ordinary Council meeting on

funding the multicultural project officer as a full time position; and

5. A report be brought back in 12 months on a review of the achievements of the

Multicultural Project Officer.

 

This report addresses items 2 b. and 4 above.

 

Draft Community-led Celebration Day Grant Guidelines (Multicultural Communities) are proposed for Council approval (Attachment One).

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Council is advised that to increase the proposed four day per week Multicultural Policy Project Officer up to five days per week would cost an additional $16,800 per annum. This funding is available in 2018/19 due to under expenditure in the Multicultural Policy allocation, however no additional funding for a fifth day is available beyond 30 June 2019.

 

CONCLUSION

Implementing the Multicultural Policy is a priority project.  The first six months of the position needs to achieve significant new outcomes.  It is therefore proposed that Council recruit a Multicultural Policy Project Officer position four days per week as a permanent position; and allocate funds for an additional day per week until 30 June 2019 to give traction to policy implementation.  

 

This approach enables Council to achieve significant outcomes, including delivering the Community-led Celebration Day Grants, in 2018/19.

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Community-led Celebration Day Grant Guidelines

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 8

Subject:         Portuguese Community Collaboration Protocols           

Prepared By:     Simon Watts - Social and Cultural Planning Manager  

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

On 27 February 2018 Council agreed to enter a collaboration protocol between the Portuguese Republic, the Sydney Portuguese Community Club and the Sydney Madeira Club (Attachment One). Council is now asked to approve the next phase of this work, agreeing on specific projects to create to give effect to this collaboration intent.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.       Receive and Note this report;

 

2.       Agree to explore further:

 

a.   The potential community health and wellbeing initiatives that might better meet the needs of people of Portuguese backgrounds;

 

b.   Potential renaming of Audley Street Petersham between New Canterbury Road and Trafalgar Streets to a name with greater cultural significance to the Portuguese community;

 

c.   Explore the potential for street art created by Portuguese artists; and

 

d.   Further liaison with Roads and Maritime about inclusion of Portuguese elements in the Petersham Station access improvements.

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

Inner West Council has provided long-standing support to the Portuguese communities in the city. Council affirms the socio-cultural and economic contribution of the Portuguese community in Petersham and the broader city.

 

Petersham is referred to as Little Portugal and has been the geographic heart of Portuguese-Australian culture in Sydney since the 1960’s. Council is investing in the Petersham Public Domain Master Plan and this will guide incorporation of Portuguese art and design elements in future works. This is an opportunity to integrate the local Portuguese community in a way that enhances design outcomes and build strong connections to the local community.

 

These collaboration projects are proposed to be a further development in planning and working in cooperation to strengthen the existing ties and implement new means of cooperation for the benefit of the Portuguese community in Sydney.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

These projects will be undertaken within existing Council resources and plans.

 

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Collaborative engagement with Portuguese community representatives has led to the identification of the following issue for further work:

 

·    Community health and wellbeing initiatives that might better meet the needs of people of Portuguese backgrounds

·    The potential renaming of Audley Street Petersham between New Canterbury Road and Trafalgar Streets to a name with greater cultural significance to the Portuguese community

·    Explore the potential for street art created by Portuguese artists, potentially traditional stone art or more contemporary artistic expressions by younger Portuguese artists

·    Further liaison with Roads and Maritime about inclusion of Portuguese elements in the Petersham Station access improvements.

 

CONCLUSION

Council is requested to note the advice and to endorse further work on developing these projects.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Portuguese Community Collaboration Protocol 2018

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 9

Subject:         Gambling Harm Minimisation           

Prepared By:     Simon Watts - Social and Cultural Planning Manager 

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

To report back on the Gambling Harm Minimisation Mayoral forum and the proposed features of a Gambling Harm Minimisation Compact for 2019.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council :

 

1.   Note the outcomes of the Gambling Harm Minimisation Mayoral forum; and

 

2.   Approves negotiating an Inner West Gambling Harm Minimisation Compact based on the following points:

a.   Engaging a high profile ambassador for promoting harm reduction

b.   Improved training for staff in venues provided by the industry

c.   Targeted support from Office of Responsible Gambling.

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

Notice of Motion (C0818 (1) Item 35) Gambling Harm Minimisation:

 

THAT Council:

Convene an Inner West Gambling harm minimisation round table with representatives from the Alliance for Gambling Reform, experts in gambling harm minimisation, local clubs and pubs, other interested organisations and Councillors. The aim of the round table would be to discuss making a local gambling compact with local strategies we as a community could agree on to reduce the problem gambling and assist those who experience this problem.

 

A Gambling Harm Minimisation Mayoral forum was held on 7 November 2018 with key stakeholders from the Alliance for Gambling Reform, local hotels and clubs, Clubs NSW, Australian Hotels Association, Bet Safe, a leading academic, and Council officers. Participants outlined a range of perspectives on the issue of gambling harm minimisation. Participants discussed three elements that might be included in a compact and committed to further work on these options. This report provides a brief summary of key issues from the meeting and a potential approach for a compact for 2019.

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Gambling is a lawful activity and Australians are the world’s most prolific gamblers.

 

The most popular form of gambling is the purchase of a lottery ticket – almost 30 % of Australians reported spending money on lottery games, like Powerball or Oz Lotto, in a typical month. Just 8% of Australians report spending money on poker machines, 6 % on the horses and 3% on other sports betting. Last year Australians lost nearly $24 billion to gaming, more than half on poker machines at pubs and clubs across the country. 39% of Australians aged 18 years or older are estimated to engage in at least some form of gambling activity on a regular (at least monthly) basis.

 

8 per cent of Australian adults report some form of adverse consequence from gambling including almost 60 per cent of this group, for example, report at least sometimes betting more than they can afford to lose, and almost 40 per cent admitted to at least sometimes thinking they might have a gambling problem. 200,000 Australians are problem gamblers.

Men, Indigenous Australians, people with lower levels of educational attainment, and unemployed job seekers are all more likely to be problem gamblers.

 

Gambling with machines in Australia is generally declining in terms of numbers participating, except in NSW, where modest increases are being experienced. The single biggest decline in machine gambling is attributed to the ban on smoking in licensed venues, explaining directly renovations to hotels to enable outside smoking area, often with gambling machines.

Losses on machine gambling are generally declining Australia wide, including in NSW, although NSW is still the highest nationally. The amount lost per poker gambler (in pubs and clubs) in both NSW and Victoria is around $3,500 per year, or around $65 per week. The ACT sits at around $3,000 per gambler per year, followed by the NT and Tasmania at around $1,500 per year. To put this in some perspective, the average Australian adult spent $1,245 on electricity and gas in 2014-15.

 

SUMMARY OF ISSUES RAISED IN THE MAYORAL FORUM

 

The following key issues were raised during the Mayoral Forum:

·    Every staff member who works in gaming is required to undergo responsible conduct of gambling course.  This aims to develop the skills to offer gambling in a responsible way, and comply with state regulation.

·    Every club and pub required to have responsible gambling program. Activities include self-exclusion, immediate 24 hour phone gambling counselling and support.

·    Clubs and pubs make a significant contribution to the economy of the Inner West.

·    There has been an approximate 70% reduction of gaming floor space in hotels in the Inner West since 2001. State average over that time is 10% reduction

·    There are 92,000 poker machines in NSW outside of casinos

·    Inner West clubs rank 19 of 103 for poker machine losses, and 18 of 103 for number of machines

·    Inner West pubs rank 7th for poker machine losses and 2nd for number of machines.

·    Although the total number of machines is decreasing, the losses are increasing.

·    Losses in last 12 months in Inner West have increased 12 %

·    Clubs are doing very well, their losses are falling

·    There's no one single solution, gambling is very complex problem

·    Pathways into counselling are critical

·    Harm minimisation requires a better conversation about gambling in the public domain.  There is too much victim blaming. The blame is often placed on the gambler experiencing harm, not the industry providing the machines.

·    Local government is not the consent authority for gaming machines

 

POTENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A GAMBLING HARM MINIMISATION COMPACT

There was broad agreement at the forum of the importance of reducing stigma associated with those who are experiencing gabling harm, of raising awareness of the issue and of encouraging people to seek support with gambling issues early.

There was considerable discussion of what actually works to reduce harm. It was argued that there was there was a role for venue management to support staff to be proactive and engage with gamblers, exploring sign of emotional distress in a non-judgmental manner and refer people for support as appropriate. It was argued that there are elements of corporate social responsibility and customer service that might be argued to be behind such a renewed approach.

There was also an appetite for exploring the following elements:

1.   High profile ambassador promoting harm reduction

ClubsNSW have developed a campaign that Nathan Hindmarsh leads as the ambassador. The tag line is: If it's not fun anymore, it's ok to ask for help. Mr Hindmarsh speaks to groups about his personal experience with gambling, how he got help, about looking after mates, and not being afraid to own up to needing help. ClubsNSW can deploy the campaign in the Inner West perhaps in conjunction with school or sports events, along with council.

2.   Improved training for staff in venues

A new training package is being developed at the University of Sydney for venue staff. It aims to ensure that staff are well trained not just to identify signs of gambling harm, and to learn skills on how to interact with customers in a non-judgemental way. The onus is placed on corporate responsibility where venue operators shift the focus away from the issue of problem gambling to customer service. Current training imparts competency for gambling and teaches the signs to look at for, but doesn't give skills to respond.

3.   Targeted support from Office of Responsible Gambling

The Office of Responsible Gambling has funded programs from multiple service providers across the Inner West. They are open to discussions about targeting to areas of emerging need.

 

CONTEXT

 

The most pervasive gambling method is poker machines (electronic gambling machines). The Inner West has two clubs and two hotels in the list of 100 most profitable NSW venues by gambling machine revenue. Overall poker machine numbers in the Inner West are much lower than other areas, particularly compared to the City of Sydney.

 

In the six months 1 December 2017 to 31 May 2018 the Inner West had 1,126 gambling machines at 17 clubs. These machines made a net profit of $28.8 million, attracting tax of $5.9 million. In the same period, the Inner West had 916 gambling machines at 56 hotels. These machines made a net profit of $40.3 million.

 

The role of the NSW Government and councils

 

In NSW, poker machines are regulated by the Government through the Office of Responsible Gambling. Section 209(3) of the NSW Gaming Machines Act 2001 prohibits Councils considering gambling in social and economic impact assessments. This provides a statutory limit on the direct influence local councils have on the number of EGMs and their associated impact in the community. Fairfield City Council is the only LGA with an EGM harm minimisation policy, although Northern Beaches is working intensively on the issue, and has released a draft EGM Harm Management Strategy for public comment. Fairfield has the largest number of poker machines of any LGA and records the biggest gambling losses in NSW (and Australia). 

 

The Office of Responsible Gambling funds and provides a range of programs to minimise gambling harm. The Responsible Gambling Fund is funded by a levy on the Star Casino and allocates around $18 million per annum for such initiatives. The Office leads on a number of issues including:

 

·    Gambling related signage (in seven community languages)

·    Player information brochures

·    Self-exclusion schemes

·    Displaying clocks

·    Gaming machine advertising

·    Locating gaming machines and jackpot displays

·    Cheques and cash-dispensing facilities

·    Player reward schemes and promotional prises

·    Gambling inducements

·    Responsible Conduct of Gambling Training (renewal required every five years)

·    Investigation of any possible misconduct, mismanagement of funds and assets

·    Investigation of complaints and breaches.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Nil additional. Council staff will assist in the development of a compact.

 

CONCLUSION

This report provides feedback on the Gambling Harm Minimisation Mayoral forum and the proposed features of a Gambling Harm Minimisation Compact for 2019.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 10

Subject:         Open Inner West 2018/19 Program for Endorsement           

Prepared By:     Raffaela Cavadini - Community Cultural Development Officer  

Authorised By:  Erla Ronan - Group Manager Community Services and Culture

 

SUMMARY

Open Inner West (OIW) is an annual festival and grants program which celebrates cultural diversity (multiculturalism), encourages the transfer of skills and traditions across generations and targets participants of all ages. The Festival demonstrates the talents and creativity of our culturally diverse community as well as the humanity connecting us all.

 

The next  festival will take place from 14 to 23 June 2019 and will comprise a range of events and activities for Council’s consideration and endorsement as included in this report.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.       The report be received and noted;

 

2.       Council note evaluations have been received for 2017-18 programs;

 

3.       Council note the festival dates for 2018-19; and

 

4.       Council endorse funding the 19 applications as outlined in Attachment 1. Successful Grant Recipients 2018-19, totalling $59,994 for the OIW 2018-19 grants Program.

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

The Open Inner West program is in its eighth year and contributes to key goals in Council’s Community Strategic Plan, Our Inner West 2036, including:

 

Strategic Direction 2: Unique, liveable, networked neighbourhoods

OIW showcases the diversity of communities who live here (making culture and heritage visible) and offers residents and visitors enjoyable, distinctive and interesting experiences in neighbourhoods with affordable or free events.

 

Strategic Direction 3: Creative communities and a strong economy

The Festival employs local community leaders, community workers and artists to develop ideas and events which provide residents and visitors with a vibrant entertainment district. New ideas are often piloted during the Festival and have gone on to be developed into successful events in their own right.

 

Strategic Direction 4: Caring, happy, healthy communities

The OIW program demonstrates Council’s commitment to cultural diversity. The festival works to build harmonious communities where there are opportunities for cultural learning and positive interactions to take place in a safe and fun environment.

 

Strategic Direction 5: Progressive local leadership

The festival is an empowering tool. It puts the decision making in the hands of the community and engages them in democracy and local government. The program provides practical workshops on best practice in Food Safety, Media and Marketing and Event and Risk Management. Workshops are provided in plain English to make the information more accessible and ongoing support ensures groups can successfully deliver their events and activities while also meeting regulatory and compliance requirements of Local Government.

 

2018 Program Acquittal

In 2018 OIW showcased and celebrated the inner wests’ cultural diversity with 18 events and activities from 15 -24 June between refugee and NAIDOC week. All 18 grants have been acquitted.  The acquittals reveal that 11,156 audience members attended with 129 partners and 12 Council teams involved in the delivery of these events. 

 

70% of event organisers reported they were “extremely satisfied” with their event and 77% of audiences reported the event was ‘excellent’ with an additional 19% reporting the event was ‘very good’. Audiences reported they attended events to support the culturally diverse community, the desire to support their own community or to learn about another culture. The most liked aspects of the events were the sharing of culture, the theme of the event and the fact that the events were community run.

 

Feedback from event organisers about Council’s support provision in the lead up to the Festival was appreciative. Statements were themed around how the support provided recipients with new skills and awareness, fostered new networks, provided practical  assistance and advice.

 

Please see Attachment 3: 2017-18 Open Inner West Feedback from Acquittals for more details.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Nil additional resources required. There are sufficient funds in the 2018/2019 Living Arts Operating Budget to implement the recommendations appearing in this business paper.

 

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

2019 OIW PROGRAM

 

Council’s 8th OIW Festival will take place from 14 June to 23 June 2019.

 

The OIW 2018-19 Grants Program opened 5 October and closed 7 November 2018, during this time two public information sessions on were held. The grants were promoted through advertising in local papers, Council’s website and social media accounts and the Living Arts Newsletter. Flyers were also distributed to Council library branches and the information boards. Community organisations, community members and individual artists that participated in previous programs were also notified of the funding via e-mail campaign.

 

30 OIW grant applications were received, requesting a total of $138,551 from a pool of $60,000. Applications were assessed by an Assessment Panel, consisting of:

 

•           Settlement Services Officer, Metro Assist

•           Refugee Welcome Centre Coordinator, Settlement Services International

•           Local Resident, Aboriginal Educator and previous OIW program contributor

•           Living Arts Manager, Inner West Council

•           Community Project Officer, Inner West Council

•           Community Arts Project Officer, Inner West Council

 

Applications were assessed against the selection criteria in the OIW 2019 Guidelines.

 

Of the 30 applications assessed under the OIW Grants Program, 18 applications totaling $59,994 are recommended for funding (see Attachment 1. Successful Grant Recipients 2018-19). It is the Panel's view that a number of projects could deliver outcomes aligned with the Community Strategic Plan, to the benefit of residents, with Council support at a more modest level than the requested amounts.  Accordingly, a number of projects are recommended for part-funding. The projects represent a variety of events and activities across the Inner West.

 

The recommended applications are of a high standard, meet the OIW Eligibility and Assessment Criteria and address the program objectives. Once the recommended applications have been endorsed and recipients notified, professional development workshops will be provided. Council officers will also provide support to groups and individuals on an as needs basis.

 

12 applications are not recommended for funding (see Attachment 2. Unsuccessful Grant Recipients 2018-19). The applications not recommended for funding were not eligible or as strong as other applications, did not address the selection criteria as well as others and were viable without Council’s support.

 

It is recognised that the funding pool is $60,000 and therefore Council is not able to fund all proposals each year.  Council Staff liaise with unsuccessful applicants, and refer them to other grants rounds where appropriate, assist them to develop program concepts, and invite their participation in Council- run programs including Edge.  Two of the applications in this category will be partly supported through other Living Arts operational funds, Know Your Neighbour (Metro Assist) and Movement: A World Refugee Day Celebration (Eleni Christou).

 

 

CONCLUSION

The principle elements of the Community Strategic Plan are sustainability, social justice and creativity, recognising the inner west as defined by our diversity of people, places and ideas. The grants programs enable Council to work towards this vision in partnership with our community.  The positive response and previous evaluations of the Open Inner West Program demonstrates the success of this initiative in building stronger community relationships and enhancing the already culturally rich demographic.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Successful Grant Recipients 2018-19

2.

Unsuccessful Grant Recipients 2018-19

3.

Open Inner West 2018 Feedback from Acquittals

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 11

Subject:         Birchgrove Wharf - Accessibility Options through Yurulbin Park           

Prepared By:     Aaron Callaghan - Parks Planning and Engagement Manager 

Authorised By:  Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

 

SUMMARY

Transport for NSW have developed options to address equal access provision to Birchgrove Wharf, through Yurulbin Park.  The positive and negative attributes of the options are discussed within the report.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.       Advise Transport for NSW that it supports Option 3 as the preferred option for equal access to Birchgrove Wharf, through Yurulbin Park;

 

2.       Requests that Transport for NSW engage Bruce Mackenzie and Associates to provide comments on the detailed design for improved accessibility and provide input into the landscaping design works for Yurulbin Park; and

 

3.       Request that Transport for NSW reconsider the option of relocating the ferry wharf to Miklouho-Maclay Park, Grove Street, Birchgrove, should the accessibility project to Birchgrove Wharf not proceed within five years.

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

An award winning designed park, Yurulbin Reserve was designed by Bruce Mackenzie and Associates, landscape architects, and developed between 1972 and 1977. Bruce Mackenzie also designed the park at Illoura Point in 1970. Both parks were seminal works that demonstrated two main philosophies that would become dominant in Australian landscape architecture during the period. One was a design which was focused on creating an environment in sympathy with its natural origins using Australian native plants. The other sought to create an escape from urban pressures.

 

The park, originally known as Long Nose Point Park, like Illoura Reserve, incorporates a sequence of spaces, and uses natural stone elements and outcrops.  The hand hewn sandstone path, the slipway, concrete walls and heavy timber elements incorporated into the design also remain as a reminder of its former commercial use. The design received the 1982 merit award of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects. In 1994 the name of the point and park was changed to “Yurulbin Point” to reflect the Aboriginal heritage of the area.

 

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) operates a ferry wharf at the base of the park as part of the F8 ferry route between Cockatoo Island and Circular Quay. This route operates 23 times a day Monday to Friday in each direction, 17 to 18 times a day on Saturday in each direction, and 12 to 13 times a day on Sunday and on public holidays in each direction. Patronage for Birchgrove Wharf in the financial year 16/17 was approximately 65 customers per day. A new pontoon ferry wharf, constructed by TfNSW was opened on the 24 April 2018.

 

Of the 32 wharves in the Sydney Ferries Network, Birchgrove Wharf is one of 10 that is not accessible.  The Human Rights Commission has ruled that Transport for NSW as a provider of public transport infrastructure, has an obligation to ensure that there is a continuous accessible path of travel linking the nearest public street to the wharf. This is consistent with the requirements of clause 7 of AS1428.2 (1992).

 

Discussions on the provision of equal access at Yurulbin Reserve have been ongoing for a number of years.  Detailed design options from TfNSW have recently been received following a ruling from the Human Rights Commission requiring TfNSW to resolve with Council an agreeable access plan within six months. This ruling was handed down in May of 2018. A copy of this ruling is provided as Attachment 2.

 

During the planning and construction period associated with the new wharf, discussions were initiated by TfNSW on options for equal access from the new ferry wharf to Louisa Road at the top of the park. At the outset of the discussions in 2015, prior to the new wharf build, Council officers recommended that a more suitable and /or supplementary site for the Ferry wharf would be that of the Miklouho- Maclay Park at the end of Grove Street in Birchgrove. This location would have made more practical sense as DDA compliant access can be easily achieved and importantly the site is also serviced by the 441 bus (site highlighted in Fig 1.0). This option was not supported by TfNSW due the additional travel time component that this would place on the existing ferry timetable. Council officers still believe that this is an option worth exploring further especially if Yurulbin Reserve is alienated as a construction site for the Western Harbour Tunnel. 

 

 

Fig 1.0 –Yurulbin Reserve, Birchgrove Oval and Miklouho- Maclay Park

 

 

Equitable Access Options in Yurulbin Reserve

 

Access to the wharf is solely via a worn set of stairs, comprised of a mix of concrete steps and steps hand hewn from the sandstone bedrock. Improvement of the stairs is included with all options. Seven options, featuring a combination of lifts and graded paths for wheeled access have been considered by TfNSW and presented to Council. Attachment 1 highlights the options which have been recommended for consideration by Council. All of the options presented have impacts on the park.

 

All of the options presented will have impacts on the character and amenity of the park as well as its design within the landscape, which was a core principal in its design intent. At the park’s inception and design in the 1970’s accessibility was not a key design criteria. In this respect it is noted that Council is committed to achieving equal access in all of its parks where this is technically possible. 

 

Council has an obligation to provide equity of access to the park regardless of the time or period of when it was constructed.  Both TfNSW and Council have a legal compliance issue to address triggered by the wharf upgrade. Council needs to recognise in considering any design improvements for access, that both access to the ferry wharf and the park are considered in an integrated manner. These issues can’t be considered in isolation. In undertaking design considerations it is critical that the landscape qualities of the park are recognised and that the proposed access improvements provide the least impact on these qualities.

 

Preferred Options

 

Attachment 1 outlines the potential options for the site.  TfNSW is promoting Option 7 as their preferred solution. 

 

With respect to the current options presented, Council staff have two differing views. Both options provide access to the foreshore however access to the whole park is not achievable due to the differing gradients and landscape topography.

 

The option preferred by TfNSW (Option 7) is also supported by Council’s Community and Cultural Services team.  This option includes a lift facility and an elevated path option which also leads from the top of the park to the mid lawn area. Option 7 is supported by Community and Cultural Services staff as it provides ease of inclusive access and would open up much of the bottom of the park for those with mobility impairments. This option has a larger footprint impact on the park and also impacts upon its original design intent.

 

It is noted that the option with the least impact on the park is that of Option 6.  This option includes an inclinator car, which provides for direct accessible access to the ferry wharf.  However, it does not provide access to any other part of the park.  The design could be modified at the middle landing point to provide future access to the central section of the park.

 

The option preferred by Council’s Parks Planning and Engagement team is that of Option 3. This option provides improved access to the central area of the park as well as the ferry wharf and foreshore.  In addition, it could be modified in future years to provide additional access to the park. Some realignment of the existing access to the bottom of the park will be required for maintenance vehicles.

 

Whichever design is recommended and supported by Council it is strongly advocated that the original park designer is engaged by TfNSW on landscape form treatments. It is critical that the original design intent of the park is not completely lost through the modification of the park through built form.

 

Potential Construction of Western Harbour Tunnel

 

In July 2018, RMS released a reference design for the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel. Should this project proceed it is likely to include a tunneled section under Balmain/Birchgrove linking to submerged, prefabricated sections under Sydney Harbor between Birchgrove and Waverton.

 

The reference design includes use of Yurulbin Point as a construction site providing the interface between the submerged prefabricated and the tunneled sections of the project. This activity is likely to include:

·    Relocation of the existing ferry wharf to permit construction of a temporary cofferdam (to provide interface between the ‘dry” and “wet” sections of the project);

·    Establishment of a temporary tunneling site and barge mooring in the harbour to the south of Yurulbin Park;

·    Temporary use of Yurulbin Park for activities ancillary to the tunnel’s construction.

 

The project’s current timeline anticipates exhibition of the Environmental Impact Statement early in 2019 with potential completion of the project within 5 years of project approval.

 

The decision by the Australian Human Rights Commission requires Council and Transport for NSW to reach agreement on the design option for providing access at Birchgrove Wharf. However, should the ferry services be terminated for several years due to the proposed tunnel construction operations, it may be more economic, and better serve commuters needs, to permanently relocate the new pontoon wharf to Mikloho-Maclay Park.

 

Upon the end of occupation of Yurulbin Point for tunnel works, restoration of Yurulbin Park will be necessary. The restoration design should include consideration of suitable access to facilitate inclusive use of the park.  Council may also consider installing a small public pontoon to provide access to water taxis, private vessels and other on-water recreation similar to the provision at our other foreshore parks.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The cost of the proposed access improvements will be met by TfNSW.

 

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Council’s Community and Cultural Services team have been involved in discussions with TfNSW.

 

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

There has been nil community engagement to date from TfNSW on the proposals. It is anticipated that once Council has its own preferred position, then TfNSW will undertake community engagement on a preferred option moving forward.

 

 

CONCLUSION

 

The option advocated by TfNSW and also support by Council’s Community and Cultural Services Division is that of the Option 7. This option includes a lift facility and an elevated path option which also leads from the top of the park through to the foreshore. Option 7 has a larger footprint impact on the park and also impacts upon its original design intent.

 

Council’s Parks Planning and Engagement team recommends that Council support Option 3. This option will provide for improved access to the central area of the park as well as the ferry wharf. The option has the least impact on the original design intent and could be modified in future years to provide additional access to the park

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Options for access to Birchgrove Wharf, through Yurulbin Park

2.

Ruling from the Human Rights Commission requiring TfNSW to Provide an Access Plan

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 12

Subject:         Camperdown Memorial Rest ParkSafe Update on the Outcomes of Community Engagement           

Prepared By:     Aaron Callaghan - Parks Planning and Engagement Manager 

Authorised By:  Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

 

SUMMARY

This report highlights the outcomes of community engagement in relation to a public survey on community views on park safety within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park and Fleming Street Playground in Newtown.   The survey results highlight that the community feel safe accessing the park after dark.  However, there are significant ongoing concerns about park safety and anti-social behaviour. This report recommends that Council continue to work in partnership with the NSW Police in addressing anti-social behaviour problems at Camperdown Memorial Rest Park.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Endorse the proposed location for the public toilets within the park as outlined in the report and proceed to deliver these facilities in 2019;

 

2.   In response to the engagement survey outcomes, establishes an alcohol prohibited area in the park along Australia Street (as highlighted in Fig 1.0) and seek the NSW Police assistance in administering this area;

 

3.   Maintain the current alcohol restrictions (9am-9pm) in other areas within the park;

 

4.   Undertake a public education campaign within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park and Fleming Street Playground similar to the program which has been run by the City of Sydney;

 

5.   Note the public request for increased ranger patrols in Camperdown Memorial Rest Park after dark;

 

6.   Subject to future partner funding support or grant funding, the option of a Park Ambassador program be considered should anti-social problems continue to be a concern to park users; and

 

7.   Proceed with the removal of the picnic shelter at Fleming Street Park.

 

 

BACKGROUND

At the meeting on the 9 October 2019, Council considered a report on issues concerning park safety within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park in Newtown and resolved the following:

 

1.   Council undertake a community safety survey to assess community views on park safety at Camperdown Memorial Rest Park and Fleming Street Playground. The public survey will assess the following:

 

·    Community perceptions on safety within the two park areas;

·    Community ideas on reclaim the park initiatives with regards to the types of community events and means in which Council and external agencies can assist in activating the park;

·    Community perceptions on the establishment of an alcohol free zone in the southern part of Camperdown Memorial Rest Park;

·    Community perceptions of the impact of lighting improvements on safety in Camperdown Memorial Rest Park, including the 2018/2019 summer trial of lighting pathways only;

·    Community support for increased Council presence in the park out of normal working hours as a way of activating the park, such as evening ranger patrols; and:

·    Community support for the establishment of a community garden (subject to future community ownership and management) at Fleming Street Playground and the removal of the picnic shelter.

 

2.   Council’s engagement actively includes young people who currently use Camperdown Memorial Rest Park, including working with local youth outreach organisations where required;

 

3.   The results of the public consultation are reported back to Council no later than December 2018, with the report to include an interim assessment of the impact of the lighting trial;

 

4.   Council implement the short term lighting improvements outlined in the report, for a trial period over the 2018/2019 summer in which only path lights within the park will be activated; and

 

5.   Council identify options for funding future long term lighting improvements along key pathways within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park.

 

6.  

a.   That the community survey recognise that there is well-established community support for a public toilet, and propose a location or locations for community comment;

 

b.   That council receive a report on funding and location options for the construction of the public toilet in 2018/19 or sooner; and

 

c.   That council receive a report on the existing after dark operations of the City of Sydney to improve safety and deter anti-social behaviour, with consideration of whether these operations could be extended to the park.

 

Community Engagement

 

Council launched a community engagement strategy to assess community concerns relating to park safety on Thursday 1 November 2018. The public survey ran through to Sunday 18 November. A total of 3,000 residents (both Inner West Council and the City of Sydney) were letter boxed informing them of the survey and directing them to Council’s Your Say Site (Refer to Attachment 1). Posters were also placed in the park itself advertising the engagement process. In addition to the residential letter drop, two intercept sessions were held in the park on: 

 

·    Friday 9 November 4pm – 6pm

·    Saturday 17 November 12pm – 2pm

 

Youth off the Street also undertook tailored evening surveys later in the evening with young park users. The surveys were also promoted at the Inner West Council stand at the Newtown festival on 11 November 2018. A total of 1024 people visited the Council Your Say site in relation to the public survey and a total of 678 respondents completed the survey.

Survey Questions and Results

 

Attachment 2 provides a full graphical analysis of the survey results.  In summary the key survey findings highlighted the following:

 

·    A total of 678 respondents completed a park safe survey.

·    The majority of respondents were from Camperdown

·    The majority of respondents were aged 35-49 years of age.

·    The majority of respondents were female.

·    99% of respondents visited the park.

·    A significant number of people accessed Camperdown Park at night.

·    The majority of survey respondents highlighted that they visited the park to relax and enjoy the park surroundings.

·    The majority of respondents indicated that they accessed the park in the evening hours

·    The majority of respondents agreed that they feel safe in the park after dark

·    A total of 76% of respondents supported the proposed location for the public toilets.

·    55% of all respondents supported the removal of the picnic shelter at Fleming Street Playground and the introduction of community gardens.

 

In addition to the responses collated form the survey results a number of submissions were made by residents and park users on improving safety and amenity within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park and Fleming Street Playground. These responses are highlighted in the summary of submissions –Attachment 3.

 

Alcohol Restrictions

 

Currently alcohol restrictions are in place across the park from 9am-9pm.  The public survey has highlighted community support for an alcohol prohibited zone (Refer to fig 1.0) along the Australia Street boundary of the park. Placing an outdoor alcohol restriction zone in this area will enable the NSW Police the option of confiscating bottles off park patrons who drink in this area. It is recommended that Council adopt such a strategy and enacted it with the support of the NSW Police. An educational strategy to educate park users about alcohol prohibited zone is also recommended moving forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig 1.0 Proposed  Alcohol Prohibited Zone

 

 

Lighting

 

One stand out item form the public survey results was the community perception that the park needs more lighting, not less. While the vast majority of survey respondents highlighted that they feel safe in the park after dark, the vast majority of survey respondents also requested more lighting be considered especially in the playground area.  Currently, Council has in place a six month trial over the summer period of having no lights on within the central greenspace area. Path areas remain floodlit and there are longer term plans to improve lighting along the main path which transverses the boundary of the playground. The works that are planned will provide a greater amount of light along this section of the park. It is not recommended to floodlight the playground at this stage but rather reassess lighting issues with the NSW Police at the end of the six month trial period.  

 

CCTV

 

Video surveillance in public places is not a new theme. In many cities across the world, parks and town centers have CCTV installed to record images of people using and interacting within such spaces.

Importantly CCTV images can be used as evidence in court.

 

The use of CCTV can assist in the reduction of crime. However this reduction is often partnered with other initiatives, including improved lighting, Police patrols and the introduction of restrictions within parks.  Council could consider the introduction of CCTV surveillance within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park.  It is noted that there is no funding available for this initiative.

 

Park Ambassador Program

 

The community survey has highlighted public support for increased ranger patrols both during the day time and after dark within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park.  Council’s ranger service is not trained in the area of park patrols after dark and such a proposal raises inherent safety risks to staff.   Further, there is no funding available for these additional resources.

Council could consider, in the future, complementing NSW Police activities within the park through the appointment of a Park Ambassador Program. This would require appropriately trained staff frequenting parks during the day and after dark and acting as the “ears and eyes” of the park. This role could include

·    regular site visits and inspections,

·    offering water to intoxicated persons,

·    advising park users on park rules and regulations

·    reporting damage and undesirable behaviour directly to the NSW Police

·    developing a relationship with local residents

·    educating park users on rules and regulations

 

The costs of a Park Ambassador Service are likely to be significant in terms of staff recruitment and ongoing staff management costs. Given the likely cost implications it is recommended such as a proposal only be considered should partner funding become available from either the NSW Government or  another funding provider. Such a scheme would need to be costed and future additional reporting would be required in this regard to determine whether such a service would have benefits for the community and what the value of these benefits would be in terms of improving community safety within parks.  Park Ambassadors, as distinct from Council compliance rangers, are a common service provided by Councils in the United Kingdom with annual hours of work adjusted to seasonal periods to reflect the nature of park use. 

 

Such a scheme would not however substitute the legal responsibilities for crime prevention which remain with the NSW Police.

 

Public Toilets.

 

A total of 76% of respondents supported the proposed location for public toilets within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park.  The location proposed is highlighted below in Fig 1.1.  This location is located centrally and visibly within the park and has good site lines and accessibility. The location of this facility is supported by the NSW Police. It is noted that some submissions have requested that the public toilet be located adjacent to Lennox Street where they would be located closer to the NSW Police Station. This location is immediately in the site lines of residents who live on Lennox Street. The visual issue of a public toilet directly located across the road from residential properties was also a design issue which Council officers have considered and are not supportive of. Maintaining residential amenity and views into the park is also a key park planning consideration.  Given the status of the park as a former cemetery Council will still need to resolve and manage archaeological issues which may be associated with the location recommended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig 1.1 Proposed Public Toilet Location Camperdown Memorial Rest Park.

 

 

 

City of Sydney-After Dark Operations.

 

Council officers have met with the City of Sydney to discuss strategies which the City undertakes to address anti-social behaviour in parks and streets. Importantly the City of Sydney does not provide front line services for dealing with anti-social behaviour within parks. The City of Sydney has taken a proactive approach in working with the NSW Police to address such problems. The City has run a number of educational campaigns including the Good Neighbourhood BBQ’s which are held in local parks to foster and encourage neighbours to get to know each other. One such event was partnered with the Inner West Council and held in Camperdown Memorial Rest Park on the 15 September 2018. In addition the City has also run campaigns aimed at educating park users on outdoor alcohol restrictions where these are in place within a street or public park. An example of a recent educational poster campaign is attached in Attachment 4. It is recommended that Council also adopt a similar education approach in Inner West Parks where such restrictions exist.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

There is an existing budget for the proposed toilet facilities.  The signage and education work recommended within the report can be funded from existing budgets and delivered with existing resources. 

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

 

Council’s Engagement team and Community Services Project Officer have been involved in the community engagement phases of this project. 

 

 

 

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

 

Community engagement:

 

·    Youth off the Street Engagement (within the park)

·    Your Say online survey – 3,000 residents notified

·    Park Planning and Engagement Office engagement (within the park)

·    Newtown Festival Engagement

·    VIBE Committee Engagement

 

CONCLUSION

 

Extensive community engagement has been undertaken by Council in assessing community views on park safety within Camperdown Memorial Rest Park and Fleming Street Playground. The engagement outcomes have highlighted that while the community feel safe accessing parks after dark there are significant ongoing concerns about park safety and anti-social behaviour. An ongoing partnership with the NSW Police in addressing anti-social behaviour problems in the subject park areas is recommended.

 

Subject to future partner funding support or grant funding, the option of a Park Ambassador program and/ or CCTV could also be considered should anti-social problems continue to be a concern to park users.

 

The survey outcomes have highlighted significant public support for a public toilet within the park, in the location recommended by Council officers and the NSW Police. 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Park Safety Survey

2.

Graphical Analysis of the Survey Results

3.

Submissions by Residents and Park Users

4.

Educational Poster Campaign

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 13

Subject:         Yeo Park and Gough Reserve Plan of Management - Administration Error           

Prepared By:     Aaron Callaghan - Parks Planning and Engagement Manager  

Authorised By:  Cathy Edwards-Davis - Group Manager Trees, Parks and Sports Fields

 

SUMMARY

At the 9 October 2018 Council meeting, Council adopted a Park Plan of Management for Yeo Park and Gough Reserve. 

 

It has recently come to the attention of Council officers that the final plan of management was not fully reported to Council and that through an administration error the draft working plan of management was submitted for adoption. This report recommends adoption of the final and true plan.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.       Council rescind the Yeo Park and Gough Reserve Plan of Management adopted 9 October 2018 (Attachment 1).

 

2.       Council adopt the Yeo Park and Gough Reserve Plan of Management dated September 2018 (Attachment 2).

 

3.       Council, as land manager of Yeo Park (D 500212) Reserve Trust, refers the Plan of Management dated 29 November 2018 as it relates to Yeo Park (Crown Reserve) to the Minister of Primary Industries, Land and Water for consideration for adoption;

 

4.       Council undertake independent cost analysis of the proposed park improvements, notably a future restoration of the historic Yeo Park Bandstand/Rotunda and report these costs back to Council for consideration in the ten year capital works plan; and

 

5.       To ensure continued community access and enjoyment of the park as a whole,   Council negotiate a formal license agreement with the NSW Department of Education for community access to the Department of Education land within the park.

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

It has recently been noted that an administration error was made in the uploading of the final Plan of Management for Yeo Park and Gough Reserve, which Council considered at its meeting on the 9 October 2018. The document which was presented to Council was a working document, not the final Plan of Management. The final document has been attached as Attachment 2.

 

REPORT

 

The administration error was picked up due to the requirement for specific wording around the future licensing of the park and use of the former baby health centre as a café. Section 7.0 of the Plan of Management is the relevant section in this regard. The wording in the plan of management has been corrected and updated in the final true version.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Nil.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Nil.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Nil.

 

CONCLUSION

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Attachment 1 - DRAFT Yeo Park and Gough Reserve Plan of Management

2.

Attachment 2 - FINAL Yeo Park and Gough Reserve Plan of Management

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 14

Subject:         Pathway to Carbon Neutral Council           

Prepared By:     Jon Stiebel - Urban Sustainability Manager and Claudia Cowell - Coordinator Corporate Sustainability 

Authorised By:  Jan Orton - Group Manager Sustainability and Environment

 

SUMMARY

Council has resolved to become a leader in renewable energy and carbon neutral in its own operations at the earliest opportunity (C1017 Item 25).  

                                                                                                                                       

In response, staff developed a Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council based on a technical report by specialist consultants 100% Renewables

 

The technical report has been reviewed by UNSW who concur with the report analysis and recommendations (Attachment A).

 

On this basis, Council staff have prepared a final draft Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council (Attachment B) which outlines the key strategies for carbon neutrality:

 

1.   Reduce demand for energy via an energy efficiency program (in buildings and street lights)

2.   Generate renewable energy on-site (solar on Council rooftops)

3.   Source large-scale renewable energy off-site (via Power Purchase Agreements)

4.   Transition to a sustainable fleet over time

5.   Phase out natural gas over time

6.   Reduce waste and increase composting and recycling through Council’s operations

7.   Manage emissions from equipment and supply chain through a whole-of-Council, long-term sustainable procurement approach

8.   Offset residual emissions with genuine carbon offsets (approved under the National Carbon Offsets Standard) as a last resort

 

Progress has already been made in the following areas:

 

·    New efficiency and solar projects have been identified and are ready for detailed design and procurement

·    The contract to source solar power from a regional solar farm in Moree from 1 July 2019 has been signed

·    Council has sustainable fleet and waste reduction practices in place to reduce fuel emissions

·    A draft sustainable procurement policy is in development 

 

This report seeks endorsement for the final draft Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council

 

In addition, this report responds to Council’s resolution of 25 September 2018 to receive recommendations on target dates for 100% carbon neutral and 100% renewable electricity (C1217 Item 18). 

 

Based on the work undertaken for the draft Pathway, this report provides options for target dates and recommends that Council considers the following targets:

 

·    100% Carbon Neutral by December 2025

·    100% Renewable Electricity by December 2025

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council:

 

1.   Endorses the final draft Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council for inclusion in the Draft Climate and Renewables Strategy;

 

2.   Notes that the University of NSW has reviewed the technical report on which the Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council is based, and found the report to be thorough, detailed, soundly based and practical;

 

3.   Notes that the capital program for solar and energy efficiency projects will proceed to the detailed design and procurement phase with installation to commence in 2019/20;

 

4.   Commence procurement for a second Power Purchase Agreement for renewable energy; and

 

5.   Notes the options for target dates and endorses a 100% carbon neutral and 100% renewable electricity target date of December 2025.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Inner West Council has resolved to become a leader in renewable energy and carbon neutral in its own operations.

 

A Council report tabled at the 25 September 2018 meeting (C0918 (2) Item 3) provided IWC’s draft Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council and, in particular, discussed Council’s options for off-site generation of renewable energy.

 

After consideration of the report, Council resolved to:

 

·    Note the draft Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council outlined in [the report presented to Council on 25 September 2018];

 

·    Note the proposal to include feasible energy efficiency and rooftop solar projects for Council assets in the annual budget development process, renewal and capital works programme with ‘shovel ready’ projects that have been scoped and costed to be brought to Council for earlier consideration;

 

·    Commission the University of New South Wales to undertake a peer review of the draft Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council and supporting technical reports;

 

·    Endorse staff to proceed with the assessment of options for converting the “residual load” to renewable power. This assessment should include identification of potential renewable energy procurement such as a PPA in addition to the existing SSROC buyers group, with a view to accelerating the conversion to renewable power as soon as possible;

 

·    Receive a further report on the final Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council in November 2018 …[including]... information on potential target dates for inclusion in the draft Climate and Renewables Strategy to achieve:

 

a. 100% carbon neutrality (across all corporate emissions); and
b. 100% renewable energy (across energy consumption).

This report addresses the final three points of the above resolution, and makes further recommendations for Council’s consideration.

 

REPORT

 

University of NSW Peer Review

 

Specialist consultancy firm 100% Renewables prepared a detailed technical report that forms the basis of Council’s carbon neutral pathway.  In October 2018 the final draft of the technical report was provided to Dr. Mark Diesendorf, an Honorary Associate Professor at UNSW and Education Program Leader at the Cooperative Research Centre for Low Carbon Living.

 

The UNSW peer review confirmed that the technical report is thorough, detailed, soundly based and practical (Attachment A). 

 

Dr Diesendorf also “commends Council for deciding to become one of the Local Government leaders in the transition to 100% renewable energy and carbon neutrality”.

 

Updated Carbon Neutral Pathway

 

Noting the endorsement from UNSW, staff produced a final draft Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council (Attachment B) which provides detail around eight key strategies:

 

1.   Onsite Energy efficiency

2.   Onsite Solar on Council buildings

3.   Off-site renewable energy

4.   Transition to sustainable fleet

5.   Timely phase out of natural gas

6.   Reduce emissions from waste

7.   Sustainable procurement

8.   Carbon offsets as a last resort

 

Most of these activities result in operational cost savings over time with the exception of carbon offsets which involve an annual expenditure with no return on investment.

 

A draft Work Plan has been developed to guide delivery of the Pathway. This internal working document will guide staff activities and will be updated annually to reflect ongoing research and program implementation. The current draft Work Plan is attached for Council’s information (Attachment C).

 

Actions for progressing with onsite efficiency, onsite solar, and offsite renewables are outlined below. Activities to see Council reduce emissions from fleet, gas, waste and procurement are detailed in the attached pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council.

 

Details of how the offsets program could work are related to the target date Council sets for A Carbon Neutral Council and are discussed in detail below.


 

Onsite Energy Efficiency and Solar

 

A range of potential energy efficiency and solar projects for implementation at Council facilities have been identified.  These will be progressed in three stages as shown in Figure 1. 

 

 

Figure 1: Staging of on-site program rollout

 

 

Stage 1 - Planning and Scoping - COMPLETE

A short-list of viable projects (efficiency and rooftop solar) with an average payback of around 6 years has been developed and scoped.  The short-list is in Attachment B. Funds have been secured for the capital program which is anticipated to be in the order of $1-1.5M, enabling Council to proceed to Stage 2- Detailed Design. 

 

Stage 2 – Detailed Design - UNDERWAY

This stage will involve procurement and management of detailed design for the capital program and will build on the preliminary technical work by 100% Renewables.  A specialist firm will be engaged to undertake design and more detailed assessment of technical and financial feasibility.  This may result in changes to the project short-list. 

 

Detailed design will occur between now and end June 2019 so that installation can commence in the first quarter of 2019/2020.

 

Stage 3 - Installation and asset management

This stage will involve procurement and management of installation, as well as planning for ongoing maintenance. Installation is expected to commence in 2019/2020.  The work program is expected to extend over 4 years and will be influenced by the availability of installers and timing constraints at individual sites.

 

 

 

 

Off-Site Renewable Energy

 

To achieve Council’s 100% renewable target, Council will need to secure renewable electricity through large renewable power projects such as a utility-scale solar farm.

In October 2018, Council secured over 4 million kilowatt-hours of renewable power from Moree Solar Farm via a PPA.  The supply is roughly equivalent to Council’s daytime electricity use and will reduce Council's carbon emissions by almost 4,000 tonnes[1] every year (equivalent to taking more than 1,000 average NSW cars off the road each year).  Supply will commence on 1 July 2019.

 

The PPA was a landmark for local government, and is the first of such agreements in New South Wales.  Staff are aware of only one other local government arrangement in Australia, namely the Melbourne Renewable Energy Project which will be supplied by Crowlands Wind Farm from 1 January 2019.

 

Figure 2 Moree solar farm

 

As per Council’s resolution, staff will now commence the process of sourcing the next renewable energy contract.  At least 18 months will be required to assess legal and market constraints and undertake procurement.  The next renewables contract will begin when the current retail electricity contract expires on 1 July 2022.  It is likely a third source will be required to convert 100% of Council’s power to renewables.

 

 

Proposed Target Dates for 100% Renewable and 100% Carbon Neutral

 

The Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council outlines the differences between 100% carbon neutral and 100% renewable. In summary, an organisation is:

 

·    carbon neutral when its net carbon emissions are equal to zero 

·    100% renewable when its electricity is supplied entirely from renewable sources[2] 

 

Figure 3: Relationship between goals

 

 

Options for “100% renewable” target date

Council’s 100% renewable target will be achieved through:

·    reducing electricity consumption through energy efficiency projects

·    generating solar power on Council rooftops

·    purchasing renewable electricity

 

As noted previously, Council has recently made a large step towards this goal by:

·    Identifying a number of onsite efficiency and solar projects

·    Securing solar power from Moree solar farm. 

These steps will increase Council’s renewable electricity percentage to around 30%. 

The next step to reach a 100% renewable target will be to purchase additional renewable power when Council’s existing electricity contracts expire.  Council’s electricity contracts typically run for at least three years as medium-term contracts offer attractive prices and security of supply. 

The proportion of renewable electricity can be increased each time a contract expires as shown in Figure 4.  On this basis, this report recommends a 100% renewable energy target date in 2025 (FY26).  Informal transitional targets have been provided to show progress over time as discussed in later sections. 

Renewable energy procurement remains a complex and challenging exercise, particularly in light of significant national policy uncertainty.  Renewable target dates are therefore based on current information and assumptions about the likely course of future electricity markets.

 

Figure 4: Potential increases in Council’s renewable electricity supply over time

 

Options for “100% carbon neutral” target date

Council’s 100% carbon neutral target will be achieved through:

1.   reducing electricity consumption through energy efficiency projects

2.   generating own solar power on Council rooftops

3.   purchasing carbon-neutral renewable energy

4.   long-term transition to a sustainable fleet

5.   long-term phase-out of natural gas

6.   reducing minor emissions from Council’s operational waste streams

7.   reducing minor emissions from equipment and supply chain through a long-term sustainable procurement approach

8.   offsetting residual emissions with carbon offsets (each year) 

 

Carbon Offsets

Even after undertaking various actions to reduce carbon emissions, there will be some residual carbon that cannot be eliminated. The final step above is therefore supporting third-party carbon reduction projects through certified carbon offsets.  Council essentially purchases a carbon reduction, which can be claimed by Council (not the organisation undertaking the project).

 

Council has expressed a preference for tangible carbon reduction projects over a reliance on carbon offsetting, as noted in the October 2017 resolution "Make the Inner West Council 100% carbon neutral by the earliest possible date, while balancing immediate actions with the need for more impactful, longer term solutions".

 

The Pathway therefore recommends treating offsets as a last resort after all other on-ground, tangible measures have been exhausted. The volume of offsets that must be purchased depends on the amount of residual carbon generated by Council and the target date set, see Table one.

 

An annual budget allocation will need to be established to purchase the required volume of offsets each year so that Council remains 100% carbon neutral.

 

Table 1: Estimated financial implications of selected carbon neutral target dates

 

Target Date

Reliance on offsets in Year 1

Estimated offset cost over 10 years (2020 to 2030)[3]

Low cost

(international low cost)

Mid-range cost

(mix Australian and international)

Higher cost

(Australian higher cost or international higher cost)

July 2019 (FY20)

Highest

190K

930K

1.8M

July 2020 (FY21)

Medium

160K

800K

1.5M

July 2022 (FY23)

Medium

110K

540K

1M

July 2025 (FY26)

Lowest

  60K

288K

 580K

July 2030 (FY31)

Lowest

  12K

 60K

 120K

 

 

As shown, a target date of 2019 has a higher offset cost across a ten year period (2020-2030) as Council will not have had time to see the benefits of the onsite efficiency and solar projects and offsite procurement of renewable energy before offset purchases commence.

 

A target date of 2025 has a significantly lower financial impact as it allows Council time to implement all other actions and reduce carbon emissions through tangible projects before offsetting.  

 

This report recommends a target date of December 2025, as this will reduce dependence on offsets.  Figure 5 illustrates the approach, showing the anticipated roll-out of tangible carbon reduction projects, and offset purchases in FY26.

 

It is important to recognise the program illustrated in Figure 5 is based on a series of assumptions around project timings, (Table 2). This includes commercial matters that are partially outside Council’s control.

 

Table 2: Assumptions in Figure 5

 

Project

Assumptions

PPA (#1):

Offsite solar from Moree solar farm from 2019/2020

SLIP (#1)

Efficiency in residential street lights in 2019/2020 and 2020/2021

Capital works:

Onsite rooftop solar and energy efficiency projects

SLIP (#2):

Efficiency in main road street lights in 22/23 (yet to be planned/funded)

PPA (#2):

Additional offsite renewable power from 2022/2023

PPA (#3):

Supply of remaining renewable power from 2025/2026

Offsets:

Offsetting residual carbon from 2025/2026 onwards

* SLIP = Street Lighting Improvement Program, PPA = Power Purchase Agreement

 

 

 

 

Figure 5: Pathway to 100% Carbon Neutral in FY26

 

 

Summary of Proposed Target Dates

 

The proposed targets seek to achieve carbon neutrality and a switch to fully renewable electricity as quickly as possible while reducing reliance on carbon offsetting.  Proposed target dates are:

 

·    100% Carbon Neutral by December 2025

·    100% Renewable Electricity by December 2025

 

These end point targets would be included within the Draft Climate and Renewables Strategy for consideration by Council in the third quarter 2019/2020 prior to public exhibition. 

 

Transition targets have been identified for the interim years as shown in Figure 6.  These would be informal goals which could be used by Council to track progress.

 

Figure 6: Transition to 100% carbon neutral and 100% renewable

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

The Chief Financial Officer has provided the following advice on the financial implications of the Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Council:

 

1.   Funding for the Street Light Improvement Program for residential roads (SLIP #1) has already been allocated in the Council budget.

 

2.   Funding for the solar and energy efficiency projects (Capital Works) is available in the environmental reserves, and will be managed by the Environment and Sustainability Group.

 

3.   The Environment and Sustainability Group 2018/2019 budget includes an unspent $100,000 allocated to solar farm feasibility, which will be re-directed to technical and legal background work for Council’s next renewable energy PPA as well as project scoping, planning and specifications for onsite capital works.

 

4.   If the solar and energy efficiency projects generate real budget savings (against the current Long Term Financial Plan (LTFP)), Council can resolve to fund future efficiency and renewable energy projects from these budget savings.

 

5.   Council is currently working with SSROC to establish the budget for the Street Light Improvement Program for main roads (SLIP #2). This work has not yet been funded and will be reported back to Council as that project progresses.

 

6.   Offset purchases are not yet funded.  The annual offset cost will depend on

·    the target dates selected by Council

·    whether the projects described in this report deliver the carbon savings estimated

·    offset market prices at the time of purchase. 

 

The renewable energy contracts (the PPAs) are treated as cost neutral for the purpose of this report.  PPA#1 with Moree Solar Farm was established on the basis that the rates offered were lower than the current electricity contract, and that it would offer Council some cost savings over the life of the contract compared to predicted market rates.  Similar arrangements will be sought for PPA#2 and PPA#3, however this will depend on the electricity market at the time of contracting.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

 

Internal and external stakeholders have been consulted throughout the technical work associated with this project.

 

A Project Control Group (PCG) was formed and has met at three key points in the project.  PCG members are:

 

·    Deputy GM Assets and Environment

·    Deputy GM Finance and Administration

·    Group Manager Environment and Sustainability

·    Manager Urban Sustainability

·    Group Manager Properties Major Projects and Facilities

(represented by Manager Facilities)

·    Group Manager Procurement and Fleet

·    Group Manager Recreation and Aquatics

·    Group Manager Finance

·    Group Manager Library and History Services

 

Stakeholders involved in developing and reviewing the list of on-site projects included:

 

·    Group Manager Community Services and Culture

·    Group Manager Library and History Services

·    Group Manager Recreation and Aquatics

·    Group Manager Parks Trees and Sportsfields

·    Group Manager Procurement and Fleet

·    Group Manager Roads & Stormwater

·    Manager Fleet Management Services

·    Manager Parks Capital Works Manager

 

Stakeholders involved in detailed discussions around the off-site renewable projects were:

 

·    Deputy GM, Chief Financial and Administration Officer

·    Deputy GM, Assets and Environment

·    Group Manager Environment and Sustainability

·    Manager Urban Sustainability

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

 

The members of the former Environment Strategic Representation Group were briefed on the overall approach on 21 June 2018.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

UNSW Peer Review

2.

Final Draft Carbon Neutral Pathway

3.

Draft Work Plan

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 15

Subject:         Balmain Leagues Club Precinct Development Control Plan Amendment           

Prepared By:     Leah Chiswick - Executive Strategic Planner 

Authorised By:  David Birds - Group Manager Strategic Planning

 

SUMMARY

An application has been received, on behalf of the owner of the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct, to amend the site specific provisions under Leichhardt Development Control Plan 2000 (DCP 2000).

 

A thorough review of the proposed amendments and supporting documentation has concluded that the Proponent’s scheme does not achieve acceptable urban design, heritage or Environmentally Sustainable Design (ESD) outcomes. The key concerns of Council’s urban design consultants that remain outstanding are:

·    the lack of an upper-level setback of the proposed towers, and

·    the shaping of the towers and the height of the northernmost tower resulting in significant overshadowing of the future town square.

 

However if the Council Officer’s recommendations discussed in the report are incorporated into the DCP amendments it will result in an improved planning framework for the Rozelle site and is worthy of support.

 

A reduction in building height towards the north will also respond to the sloping topography of the site and reduce the tower’s scale and lead to an improved urban design outcome. These changes will achieve vastly superior public benefits particularly with regard to the amount of sunlight and amenity of the proposed town square at the centre of the site. The proposed changes do not significantly modify the overall gross floor area given the size of the overall FSR of the site is 3.9:1. No changes are proposed to the floor space ratio (FSR) controls contained in the Leichhardt Local Environmental Plan 2000.

 

This report seeks endorsement of the preparation and exhibition of amended DCP provisions for the site that align with the recommendations of Council’s independent reviews.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1.       Council endorse the preparation of amended development control plan provisions for the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct under Leichhardt Development Control Plan 2000 that reflect the recommendations of the urban design and heritage analysis undertaken by Conybeare Morrison (CM+) and the peer review undertaken by SGS Economics & Planning;

 

2.       Once prepared, the amended development control plan be exhibited for a minimum of 28 days in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 in early 2019; and

 

3.       Following exhibition, a report on the revised development control plan and any submissions be presented to the Council for consideration.

 

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

In March 2018, Council received an application from Heworth Pty Ltd C/o Mecone Pty Ltd to amend the DCP 2000 as it applies to the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct (shown in Figure 1 below), comprising:

·    138-152 Victoria Road, Rozelle

·    154-156 Victoria Road, Rozelle

·    697 Darling Street, Rozelle

·    1-7 Waterloo St, Rozelle

 

Figure 1: Excerpt from DCP 2000 depicting the land to which it applies

 

The DCP amendment seeks to give effect to the Proponent’s 2018 masterplan for the site.

 

A development application (DA) was lodged in May 2018 and placed on public exhibition from 12 June to 11 July 2018. The DA proposes:

 

·   Demolition of existing buildings

·   Remediation of the site

·   Construction of a mixed use development comprising:

-      Three buildings along Victoria Road 12 storeys in height. Residential accommodation at the upper levels and retail, commercial and Balmain Leagues Club at the lower levels;

-      2-3 storey buildings along Waterloo Street which incorporate live/work spaces and affordable housing;

-      Public town square in the centre of the development;

-      Three laneways (Tigers Lane, Darling Lane and Heritage Lane) which connect Victoria Road, Waterloo Street and Darling Street;

-      Speciality retail and supermarket;

-      Reinstatement of the façade to 697 Darling Street; and

-      Two basement levels with Basement 1 accessible via Victoria Road and Basement 2 accessible via Waterloo Street.

 

The assessment of the DA is currently on hold, awaiting the outcome of the review of the proposed DCP amendment.

 

Site history

 

The site has a complex history, particularly since late 2005 when a masterplan for the redevelopment of the site was submitted to Council. The table below presents key events.  

 

August 2008

LEP 2000 and DCP 2000 amended to incorporate the current site specific controls. Voluntary Planning Agreement negotiated between Council and the land owner and subsequently registered on title.

July 2010

Development application (D/2009/352) refused by the Joint Regional Planning Panel (JRPP)

·    FSR of 3.9:1 and a maximum height of 12 storeys

·    145 dwellings

·    Retail shops, restaurants, supermarket and commercial offices, public plaza, leagues club and a new infill building on Darling Street

·    6 basement levels with 550 parking spaces

·    Construction of a pedestrian bridge across Victoria Road, located partly on Rozelle Public School.

Refused on the basis of non-compliance with the FSR and height controls, excess bulk and scale, and traffic.

April 2014

Major Project Application (MP11_0015) refused by the Planning Assessment Commission (PAC)

·    FSR of 4.5:1

·    Three storey podium with two towers of 20 and 24 storeys

·    247 residential apartments

·    Retail floor space (10,982sqm) including a supermarket

·    A new Balmain Leagues Club

·    Child care centre, medical centre and commercial office space

·    488 on site car parking spaces 

Refused for the following reasons:

·    adverse impacts on the operation of the surrounding road network;

·    adverse impacts on bus services, including significant increased travel times for routes along Darling Street;

·    vehicles unable to exit the site in a safe and efficient manner; and

·    development not considered to be in the public interest.

11 August 2015

The former Leichhardt Council resolved to forward a planning proposal to the Minister for Planning seeking to:

·    Zone the site B2 Local Centre under Leichhardt LEP 2013

·    Reduce the FSR to 1.9:1

·    Reduce the height to 6-8 storeys

 

14 August 2015

Development application (D/2015/438) lodged:

·    FSR 3.9:1

·    12 storey mixed use tower with 9525sqm of retail, 1466sqm of commercial and residential apartments

·    8 storey mixed use tower with the Balmain Leagues Club (3658sqm) and residential apartments

·    Total of 135 apartments

·    5 levels (including mezzanine) of basement car parking accommodating 369 cars

·    Central plaza with access from Victoria Road, Darling Street, Waterloo Street, with at-grade access to the towers

·    A pedestrian bridge across Victoria Road

 

October 2015

Department of Planning and Environment issued a Gateway determination that the planning proposal not proceed, citing the following reasons:

·    The significant reduction in development potential for the site is inconsistent with A Plan for Growing Sydney and its potential to contribute to the renewal of the identified Parramatta to Sydney CBD via Ryde urban renewal corridor.

·    The planning proposal does not provide compelling justification for a reduction in development capacity, particularly when considered against the advice of the Planning Assessment Commission in its April 2014 refusal of a Part 3A development application for the site.

 

Council appealed the decision to the Planning Assessment Commission, who supported the Department’s determination that the planning proposal not be supported.

September 2016

Land and Environment Court dismissed an appeal against the deemed refusal of D/2015/438.

 

The Court’s refusal was justified on the following grounds:

·    Non-compliance with the site specific objectives of the LEP;

·    Design of the proposal does not demonstrate that it will contribute to the vibrancy and prosperity of the Rozelle Commercial Centre or provide a high quality transition to the existing streetscape;

·    Unacceptable traffic, solar access and cross ventilation outcomes;

·    Design of the pedestrian bridge; and

·    Lack of evidence that the area to be provided for use by the Balmain Leagues Club will promote its long term viability.

March 2018

Current application lodged to amend the site specific DCP controls

May 2018

Development application D/2018/219 lodged

·    FSR 3.88:1

·    Retail 0.69:1 – 5,093sqm, including 2,886sqm supermarket

·    Club 0.41:1 – 3,010sqm

·    Residential 2.53:1 – 173 units

·    Commercial 0.24:1 – 1,251sqm

·    275 car parking spaces

 

Current controls

Leichhardt Local Environmental Plan 2000 (LEP 2000) applies to the subject site. The site is zoned ‘Business’ and Schedule 1 (Additional uses and controls for certain land) includes site specific controls for the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct site. These include the following objectives:

 

a)      the development integrates suitable business, office, residential, retail and other uses so as to maximise public transport patronage and encourage walking and cycling,

b)      the development contributes to the vibrancy and prosperity of the Rozelle Commercial Centre with an active street life while maintaining residential amenity,

c)      the development is well designed with articulated height and massing providing a high quality transition to the existing streetscape,

d)      the traffic generated by the development does not have an unacceptable impact on pedestrian or motor vehicle traffic on Darling Street, Waterloo Street and Victoria Road, Rozelle,

e)      any residential development at street level has a frontage to Waterloo Street, Rozelle and, when viewed from the street, has the appearance of no more than three storeys.

 

The Schedule establishes the following maximum floor space ratios (FSRs) for the site:

 

FSR Components

 

Shops FSR

1.3:1

Commercial premises FSR

0.2:1

Clubs FSR

0.5:1

Residential development FSR

1.9:1

Overall FSR

3.9:1

 

Schedule 1 also specifies maximum heights on the site:

a)      in relation to a building on the site that is less than 10 metres from Waterloo Street – maximum building height of 12.5 metres,

b)      in relation to a building on the site that is less than 36 metres from Darling Street – maximum building height of 52.0 metres relative to the Australian Height Datum or two storeys,

c)      building height on the site not to exceed a reduced level of 82.0 metres relative to the Australian Height Datum or twelve storeys

 

Leichhardt Development Control Plan 2000 (DCP 2000) includes site specific controls for the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct which reflect the following objectives:

 

·     To provide a planning and urban design framework that guides the redevelopment of the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct.

·     To enable the redevelopment of the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct as a consolidated parcel.

·     To encourage well designed development with articulated height and massing.

·     To promote development that links to and contributes to the ongoing vibrancy and viability of the Rozelle Commercial Centre.

·     To promote the long term viability of the Balmain Leagues Club on the site, for the benefit of the local community.

·     To promote low and moderately priced housing through a mix of dwelling types.

·     To ensure an integrated and well designed public domain environment that supports the existing Rozelle commercial area.

·     To promote ecologically sustainable development.

 

The DCP includes layout and massing provisions, largely reflected in the following height map.

Figure 2: DCP 2000 Height Map

 

This is supported by a map depicting setbacks from boundaries, upper level setbacks and building widths.

 

The DCP states that land uses on the site shall include:

·     Commercial

·     Retail including a supermarket and fresh food market

·     Restaurants and cafes

·     Residential

·     Car parking

·     Leagues Club

·     Plaza and other accessible spaces

 

Proposed amendments

Prior to lodgment of the DCP amendment, preliminary meetings were conducted between the Proponent and Council officers and a written response was provided in relation to urban design concepts. The response by Council officers in February 2018 noted that any proposal to amend DCP 2000 must be justified by technical analysis demonstrating strategic merit and compliance with the site-specific provisions contained in LEP 2000. Specifically, the Proponent was advised that any proposal to amend the DCP should consider:

·    Traffic impacts;

·    The ongoing vitality of businesses along Darling Street;

·    The appropriateness of the pedestrian bridge and alternative works that may be delivered through a Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA);

·    The return and retention of a viable Balmain Leagues Club;

·    Built form and urban design;

·    Affordable housing; and

·    Environmental and design excellence.

 

With regard to the Council officer feedback that the Proponent’s amendment must demonstrate compliance with the site-specific provisions of LEP 2000, it should be noted that both the Proponent’s scheme and the alternate scheme prepared by Council engaged consultants (discussed later in the report) include more residential development than permitted under the LEP (1.9:1) while being consistent with the overall FSR of 3.9:1. While the DCP is silent on FSR, the building envelopes informing the DCP amendment and its review are based on floor plates comprising specific land uses, hence the variations are evident.

 

The Proponent’s masterplan includes a reduced retail component with an FSR of 0.69:1, well within the 1.3:1 FSR permitted for ‘shops’ under LEP 2000. Their submission states that “changed retail and Club footprints, as well as reduced parking rates, means that the proposed scheme is able to meet the trip generation budgets”. Traffic consultants engaged by Council have confirmed that increased retail floor space on the site would result in unacceptable traffic impacts.

 

It is apparent that a scheme that aligns with the maximum FSRs outlined in LEP 2000 would not be viable from a traffic impact perspective. The assessments of previous development applications for the site reinforce this.   

 

The DCP amendments sought by the Proponent’s original submission are outlined in the following table. The amendments largely relate to enacting the Proponent’s masterplan for the site, in particular the building envelope and location and configuration of the public domain. Objectives and rationales associated with the DCP controls are proposed to be retained.

 

DCP Control

Proponent’s proposed amendment

1.4 General Objectives

Objectives to be retained

1.5 Layout and Massing

Objective, Rationale and Design or Planning Principles to be retained.

 

Controls to be amended as follows:

·   Layout and massing to reflect the revised scheme;

·   Setbacks to reflect the revised scheme;

·   Additional control inserted requiring that the built form “demonstrate design excellence, uniqueness, innovation and celebration of the local character and heritage”.

 

1.6 Land Use

Objective and Rationale to be retained.

 

Planning Principles and Controls to be included/amended as follows:

·   Identify the commercial uses to be encouraged – collaborative and creative work spaces;

·   Encourage speciality retail which will complement the Rozelle commercial centre;

·   Removal of pedestrian bridge given objection from Department of Education and Roads and Maritime Services;

·   Removal of free home delivery from all shops as there is no guarantee to provide this through planning controls;

·   Control inserted to encourage innovative design measures to reduce noise and air pollution inside buildings;

·   Community bus to be provided and operated by the Club;

·   The control relating to the noise sensitive areas (such as bedrooms) being located away from noise sources has been removed.

 

1.7 Building Language

Objective and Rationale to be retained.

 

Planning Principles and Controls to be included/amended as follows:

·   Revision of articulation zones;

·   References to controls now covered by the Apartment Design Guide removed.

  

1.8 Development within the Conservation Area

Objective and Rationale to be retained.

 

The planning principles relating to the properties fronting Darling Street have been revised to retain the street frontage of 697 Darling Street and remove 1 Waterloo Street to facilitate the pedestrian link between Darling Street and the Town Square (the DCP currently allows demolition of both buildings with retention of contributory features).

 

1.9 Public Domain and Town Square

Objective and Rationale to be retained.

 

Planning Principles and Controls to be included/amended as follows:

·   Removal of pedestrian bridge reference;

·   Controls for the following items to be included:

-     Footpath upgrades and landscaping to the public domain;

-     The areas and locations of the laneways/through site links, Town Square, landscaped forecourt, active frontages, communal open space and deep soil landscaping;

-     Uncovered/covered areas for the public open space.

 

1.10 Access and Management

Objective, Rationale and Planning Principles to be retained.

 

Controls to be removed to reflect the proposed amendment to the public domain and Town Square.

 

1.11 Traffic Management

No amendments proposed.

 

1.12 Parking

No amendments proposed.

 

1.13 ESD Measures

The following Environmentally Sustainable Development (ESD) measures are proposed to be inserted:

·    20% reduction if greenhouse gas emissions;

·    Renewable energy generation via solar (to house services);

·    30% reduction in peak electricity demand (to house services) using solar above;

·    30% reduction in water consumption (to house services);

·    15% of water delivered (to house services) by non-potable sources including rainwater or recycled water.

 

 

The building envelopes facilitated under the existing DCP are shown in Figure 2 (DCP 2000 Height Map) above, while the Proponent’s desired scheme (as amended following Council consultant/officer feedback) is shown below in Figure 3.

 

Figure 3: Proponent’s proposed height and massing

 

Peer reviews

To inform Council’s assessment of the proposed DCP amendment, external independent consultants were commissioned to undertake the following peer reviews:

-     Economic impact (Attachment 1)

-     Traffic impact (Attachment 2)

-     Urban design and heritage impacts (Attachment 3)

 

In accordance with Council’s Fees and Charges, the costs associated with the peer reviews were borne by the Proponent.

 

Traffic and transport

Traffic consultants, Arup, were engaged to review the transport and traffic circumstances likely to be created by the proposed scheme. The methodology employed by Arup included:

·     Review and update of the base year traffic model developed by Ason Group (the Proponent’s traffic consultants) for the local area network;

·     Development of traffic generation and distribution for the proposed development;

·     Traffic assessment of the implications of the proposed development.

 

In order to conduct this review, Arup examined the proponent’s model in relation to:

·     Convergence and Calibration;

·     Travel Time Validation;

·     Assumptions and scenarios (including trip generation, trip distribution/route assignment).

 

Arup’s analysis was carried out with the understanding that no kerbside parking spaces should be removed from Darling Street, Rozelle and that any future spare capacity on Victoria Road (resulting from construction of the Iron Cove Link) would be used to improve the sustainable transport network and to provide opportunities for public domain improvements, rather than being used to accommodate increased traffic flow.

 

Arup’s review of the Proponent’s model determined that it generally conformed to the RMS Traffic Modelling Guidelines, however several minor modifications were suggested and the model modified accordingly:

·     Inclusion of increased dwell times (time to pick-up/set-down passengers) for westbound buses;

·     Slight increases in the trip generation rates for retail, club and residential uses; and

·     Some minor coding variations within the model.

 

The model was recalibrated, revalidated and run with the revised assumptions. Outputs from the revised model were then reviewed and indicated that:

·     The development scenario was generally found to result in only minor increases in average delay and density across the network, resulting in a slight reduction in average speed;

·     In general, relatively small increases (satisfying the <10% criteria that has been used throughout previous studies for this site) were recorded for most travel time routes. Exceptions to this include:

-    Route 1 (Victoria Road westbound) and Route 4 (Darling Street northbound) recorded 11% and 15% travel time increases respectively during the PM peak hour. Modelling shows the key constraint for each of these routes is the central intersection of Victoria Road and Darling Street. Movements associated with these routes operate in opposing traffic light phases which makes it difficult to improve travel time for both routes concurrently without delaying the other route.

-    Route 7 (Terry Street northbound) and route 8 (south-west bound from Wise Street to Victoria Street via Wellington Street) showed travel time increases in excess of 10% in a number of the modelled peak periods, but most notably in the Saturday midday scenario. This however was based on relatively low numbers of vehicles travelling along these routes.

 

It should be noted that while the model indicated that the individual sections of certain routes mentioned above experienced increases of greater than 15%, it was considered that the short length of these sections and often small number of vehicles were likely to reduce the model’s accuracy at these individual locations, consequently the analysis has focused on likely impacts for complete routes rather than individual sections.

 

Additionally, while latent demand was not recorded for any tested scenario it was considered unlikely to significantly vary the model’s outputs.

 

In summary, analysis of the revised model indicated that, in relation to transport and traffic implications, the current proposal can be anticipated to result in generally acceptable increases in delay/congestion on the adjacent road network, when considered in the context of likely future conditions on the adjacent road network.

 

Economic impact

SGS Economics and Planning were engaged to consider:

·   The suitability of the proposed retail and commercial floor space indicated in the masterplan, in terms of both quantum and location;

·   Impact on existing centres, particularly Rozelle and Balmain;

·   Position of the Region and District Plans in relation to commercial and retail development in the area; and

·   Any potential modifications of the proposed amendments.

 

SGS undertook an assessment and review of the evidence presented in the Economic Impact Assessment prepared by Location IQ (Proponent’s consultants) and concluded that overall the assumptions and assertions are supportable or acceptable. SGS also undertook their own retail impact assessment to test the trade diversion effects of introducing new retail floorspace.

 

In summary, SGS concluded that the quantum and mix of retail being proposed is warranted for the following reasons:

·   The site is located within an established retail centre, generating potential co-location benefits, reducing the need for vehicular travel and (potentially) greater integration within this centre.

·   There is an undersupply of retail floorspace in the local economy, particularly in terms of full-line supermarkets.

·   Expected population growth will exacerbate this undersupply.

·   There is policy support for increased floorspace (including retail) in established centres across Metropolitan Sydney under the Greater Sydney Commission’s Central City District Plan to meet the impending population growth.

·   There is no demonstrably significant trade diversion effect on any other centre (largely due to the supermarket undersupply in this area).

 

SGS considered the provision of commercial floorspace reasonable, but advised that thought should be given to which businesses it is likely to attract and what floorspace layout they require.

 

The most significant concern arising from the review of the Proponent’s EIA and the proposed scheme for the site is the potential dislocation from the remainder of the established centre. In response, SGS made the following insights and recommendations for integrating the development of the site with the rest of the centre:

·     Consider better integration of the specialty shops with Darling Street, maximising the vitality of the corner where Heritage Lane meets Darling Street;  

·     The masterplan identifies that the northern and southern frontages of the Town Square are to be activated with retail of some sort. This will likely be an attractive space and, given its direct line of sight to Darling Street, will retain visual connection important in drawing people out of the square and into Darling Street itself;

·     There is a risk that prominence along Victoria Road may jeopardise retail trade along the southern portion of Darling Street by dragging foot traffic directly to the site rather than past the exiting Darling Street frontages;

·     Placing the supermarket below ground is acceptable even though it creates some risk of visitor self-containment;

·     A supermarket at ground level would still be internalised in the development and would not provide direct visual access to Darling Street. Visual amenity and activation in the Town Square would also be reduced.

 

Urban design and heritage

Conybeare Morrison (CM+) were engaged to undertake an urban design and heritage analysis, with the heritage input provided by Extent Heritage. The adopted methodology was as follows:

·     Peer review of the documentation submitted by the Proponent, including:

-    Masterplan

-    Proposed DCP amendments

-    Statement of Heritage Impact

-    SEPP 65 Design Verification Statement

-    Development Application Design Report

·     Urban design and heritage analysis

·     Consideration of traffic and economic peer reviews

·     Identification of site opportunities and constraints

·     Development of key urban design principles

·     Development of alternate precinct masterplan options

·     Assessment of the appropriateness of potential built form scenarios in terms of urban design considerations

·     Preparation of urban planning and development controls for the precinct

 

The urban design and heritage reviews acknowledged that the Proponent’s scheme had a number of positive outcomes, including:

·     Concentrating the height adjacent to Victoria Road and away from the surrounding low density residences;

·     Incorporation of vertical recesses to make the tower building read as three towers;

·     Improved site permeability and activation;

·     Good sized and well-proportioned Town Square that is connected to adjoining streets;

·     Building scale and grain along the Waterloo Street frontage provides a successful response to the streetscape and demonstrates heritage sensitivity.

 

Notwithstanding, the following issues and missed opportunities were identified:

·     Relationship with Victoria Road in terms of scale, activation and pedestrian environment;

·     Victoria Road street wall undermined by significant building setbacks at podium level;

·     Design and form of the tower building contrasts significantly with the surrounding character;

·     Inadequate solar access to the proposed town square;

·     Redevelopment potential of adjacent lots to be constrained by nil setbacks;

·     Lack of consideration of potential future integration of the public domain with that of adjoining sites;

·     Opportunity for north-west pedestrian connection not considered;

·     Apartments to have compromised amenity due to limited opportunity for cross ventilation, solar access and visual and acoustic privacy; and

·     Development to respond to the existing local character in terms of scale, form, materials and colours, with particular regard to the adjoining HCAs and heritage items.

 

CM+ prepared an alternative scenario reflecting the following urban design principles:

·     Maximum height for the site at 12 storeys (reflecting the site specific provisions of LEP 2000);

·     Provide a two storey (10m high) street wall along Victoria Road;

·     Concentrate higher built form along Victoria Road;

·     Provide fine grain built form along Waterloo Road;

·     Provide a Town Square within the site;

·     Increase site permeability by providing a network of pedestrian laneways;

·     Facilitate future integration of the proposed Little Darling Lane with the adjoining Right of Way (rear of Darling Street properties);

·     Provide active frontages along Victoria Road, future laneways and Town Square;

·     Provide adequate building-to-building separation distances to the adjacent properties; and

·     Reuse building at No. 697 Darling Street

·     The Proponent’s scheme has essentially replaced the ‘surplus’ retail floor space with residential. The alternative scenario prepared by CM+ includes a lesser residential component, yet still exceeds the maximum permitted under LEP 2000. Notwithstanding, the suitability of any deviation from the maximum FSRs contained within LEP 2000 will ultimately be considered in the assessment of the DA.

 

The following figures (produced by CM+, incorporating inputs from the Proponent’s urban design consultant Scott Carver) depict the current Leichhardt DCP 2000 controls; the proponent’s original scheme; and the alternative scenario from a range of perspectives.

 

 

 

 


 

View 1: 3D perspective

 

 

 

Figure 4: LDCP 2000

 

 

Figure 5: Proponent’s scheme

 

 

Figure 6: Alternative envelope

 

View 2: Victoria Road (Darling Street cnr)

 

 

 

Figure 7: LDCP 2000

 

 

Figure 8: Proponent’s scheme

 

 

Figure 9: Alternative envelope


 

View 3: Victoria Road

 

 

 

Figure 10: LDCP 2000

 

 

Figure 11: Proponent’s scheme

 

 

Figure 12: Alternative envelope


 

View 4: Darling Street

 

 

 

Figure 13: LDCP 2000

 

 

Figure 14: Proponent’s scheme

 

 

Figure 15: Alternative envelope


 

View 5: Darling Street (Waterloo Street corner

 

 

 

Figure 16: LDCP 2000

 

 

Figure 17: Proponent’s scheme

 

 

Figure 18: Alternative envelope

View 6: Waterloo Street

 

 

 

Figure 19: LDCP 2000

 

 

Figure 20: Proponent’s scheme

 

 

Figure 21: Alternative envelope

 

The following recommendations of the independent urban design and heritage analysis were presented to the Proponent’s consultants for consideration and incorporation:

·     Provide a street wall height of 10m (2-storey) along the Victoria Road frontage with a setback to the tower above;

·     Activate Victoria Road by building up to the street frontage and by providing active uses along the Victoria Road frontage;

·     Articulate three distinctive towers with vertical recesses;

·     Prioritise pedestrian movement along the Victoria Road footpath by:

-      providing adequate setback to Victoria Road to accommodate the new slip lane as well as a continuous footpath of 4.5m width; and

-      continuing the footpath level and finishes across vehicular entry points.

·     Reconfigure the tower building height and setbacks to provide good solar access to the future Town Square at lunchtime during mid-winter. The alternative scenario by Consultancy CM+ introduces a series of tower heights stepping down Victoria Road (12 storeys, 11 storeys, 9 storeys);

·     Provide minimum 6m setback to the common boundaries to comply with ADG building-to-building requirements;

·     The design of proposed Little Darling Lane should be integrated with the future redevelopment of the Right of Way to the east of the site. Consider levels, columns, planters, etc;

·     Provide for a future north-westerly pedestrian connection to the potential development precinct to the northwest of the site. It was resolved during the workshop (discussed below) that an acceptable alternative would be an increased setback to Waterloo Street, providing improved pedestrian amenity;

·     Provide a clear street address for residential entries;

·     The proponent should consider ‘The Design Context: Guidelines for Infill Development in the Historic Environment’ prepared by the Royal Australian Institute of Architects NSW Chapter and the Heritage Office with regard to scale, form, materials, colours and responding to the local character;

·     The proponent should prepare perspective views from the heritage items, from Darling Street and from Waterloo Street to assess the potential impact on heritage items and the HCA.

 

It is noted that the alternate envelopes may appear relatively bulky as they are only envelopes but will be incorporated into specific DCP controls prior to exhibition of the DCP. It was agreed between the proponent and Council that Figure 15 will be the preferred option going forward for the Darling Street frontage.

 

Two workshops were conducted to proactively discuss the issues identified by the urban design and heritage peer review and its recommendations in November 2018. These were attended by Council Officers, Council’s engaged consultants and the Proponent’s consultants.

 

Subsequent to the second workshop, the Proponent provided a response to the urban design and heritage peer review comprising the following:

·     Design response (sketch form);

·     Revised draft DCP;

·     Revised DCP amendment drawings;

·     Written response to the peer review recommendations.   

 

This supplementary material was reviewed by CM+ and the following was noted:

·    A two-storey street wall height is introduced along Victoria Road; however, no upper-level setback has been provided for the tower elements. The cross section provided by the Proponent shows that the upper-level built form further encroaches into the Victoria Road setback by providing building articulation zone.  CM+ suggests that the Victoria Road setback should be free of any built form encroaches from the upper-level building envelope. As suggested in the CM+ previous comments and during the workshops, a 3 metre upper-level setback above the podium is recommended to mitigate the scale of the proposed development.

·     The ground floor uses are brought closer to Victoria Road, which is in line with the previous recommendation. The Proponent has not addressed the concern raised by Assessment Officers regarding the potential that the Club may be diminished within the overall development, especially when viewed from Victoria Road.

·     The Proponent has accepted to have a 4.5m footpath along Victoria Road in the written response by Mecone.

·     The Proponent has not shown the relocation of the vent and the substation in the plan. 

·     The Proponent fails to improve the solar access to the future Town Square. CM+ agree that locating the tower forms along Victoria Road is the appropriate urban design approach. The revised sketches marginally increase the solar access to the future Town Square; which is considered insufficient. As suggested in the previous comments and during the workshops, CM+ strongly recommend that the tower height to the north-east of the site is reduced to allow improved solar access to the future Town Square. The analysis undertaken by CM+ recommends that the solar access outcomes achieved under their alternative scenario should be incorporated as DCP requirements (minimum proportions of the Town Square to receive sunlight at certain times during the day on the winter solstice). 

·     A 6m setback to the south-east common boundary has been introduced in the revised sketches; and is measured from the centre line of the adjacent Right of Way (ROW).  Whether the proposed 6m setback is measured from the centre line of the ROW should be determined by Council with consideration of the land title of the ROW. [Assessment officers have since advised that the setback should be provided to the property boundary, not the centre line of the ROW].

·     There is no Concept Plan showing the long term public domain outcome - integrating the proposed Little Darling Lane and the ROW into a single place. However, CM+ note that the Draft DCP by the Proponent requires the Concept Plan to be provided in the DA stage.

·     A 3m wide footpath is proposed along the northeast side of Waterloo Street in the revised Draft DCP by the Proponent, however this setback is not included in the sketches by Scott Carver. A revised plan and typical cross section through the Waterloo Street footpath should be provided to illustrate the proposed footpath widening.

·     A control has been introduced in the Draft DCP by the Proponent to reflect need to consider ‘The Design Context’ document. However, the Proponent has not provided a revised Heritage Impact Assessment.

·     CM+ note that the Draft DCP by the Proponent requires photomontages to be provided at the DA stage. Photomontages from the critical vantage points, to assess the potential visual impact, have not been provided. CM+ continues to have concerns with regard to the Architectural shaping, and material and finishes of the proposed towers. Further, as previously requested, more detail is required in regard to the design of the podium level 'Green Street Wall'.

 

In summary, the key concerns of Council’s urban design and heritage consultants that remain outstanding are:

·    the lack of an upper-level setback of the towers,

·    the shaping of the towers and the height of the northernmost tower resulting in significant overshadowing of the future Town Square.

 

ESD measures

The Proponent’s draft Environmentally Sustainable Development (ESD) have been referred to Council’s Urban Ecology Team for comment. Cursory review suggests that the proposed ESD measures are lacking and that more detailed provisions should be incorporated to ensure that the outcomes achieved on this prominent site align with best practice.

 

A viable leagues club

In support of their proposed amendments, the Proponent submitted a ‘review of changing club requirements’ (Attachment 9). It states:

 

In New South Wales, research indicates that an increasing focus on service diversification and more investment in services and infrastructure that better supports the needs of local communities, has led to a gradual shift away from gaming services as the major revenue source.

 

The review considers example clubs that have diversified their offering, before concluding:


Changing consumer taste of the younger generations and changed government regulations have all contributed to a historic declining revenue for Clubs. The examples above show that Clubs that have been successful in recent years have significantly changed their business offering to focus more on providing services that these communities want. In particular, there has been a move away from larger gaming areas, with a renewed focus on family entertainment, food and beverage and recreation services.

 

The footprint proposed for the Balmain Leagues Club has been driven to best align with these examples of successful, modern Clubs, that are financially viable and reflect the changing tastes of the local community.

 

It is noted that the NSW Land and Environment Court’s finding in relation to D/2015/483 concerning the previous DA for the site was that:

 

While the Court would not normally concern itself with the user of a development, because of the way LEP 2000 was prepared and the requirement in DCP 2000 to promote the long term viability of the Balmain Leagues Club on the site, it is a valid planning consideration. Furthermore, to be satisfied that this development will be promoting the long term viability of the Club, the Court should be satisfied that the GFA provided for club use will be occupied by the Balmain Leagues Club for its long term viable usage.

 

Pedestrian bridge

The existing DCP requires the provision of a “pedestrian bridge over Victoria Road accessed directly from the development and via lift and stairs or ramp from both sides of Victoria Road”. The Proponent’s DCP amendment removes the requirement for the pedestrian bridge.

 

In the appeal against the deemed refusal of D/2015/438 Council’s expert architect and urban designer opposed a pedestrian bridge over Victoria Road, taking the position that the connectivity and pedestrian amenity of an at grade crossing at Darling Street is essential for the shopping precincts on both sides of the intersection. Council’s transport planners concur with this position. It is understood that the bridge was also not supported by Roads and Maritime Services and the Department of Education.

 

Next steps

Consistent with their brief, architectural firm CM+ are now preparing revised controls for the site that are consistent with their recommendations and the outcomes of the workshops.

 

Once these are drafted and reviewed by Council officers, and appropriate recommendations of the economic and ESD reviews are incorporated, it is proposed that they will be placed on exhibition in early 2019, noting the impending Christmas/New Year holiday period. The Proponent’s material will be made available as supplementary documentation.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

In accordance with Council’s adopted Fees & Charges, the Proponent paid a fee of $15,000 for Council to consider the proposed DCP amendment. The costs associated with the Council commissioned peer reviews were covered by the Proponent.

 

It is proposed that the fees associated with the advertisement and notification of the DCP amendment will be sought from the Proponent prior to exhibition.

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

It is recommended that draft DCP provisions, consistent with the findings of the peer reviews, be prepared and exhibited in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 (EP&A Regulation).

 

CONCLUSION

It is recommended that Council endorse the preparation of amended DCP provisions for the Balmain Leagues Club Precinct that reflect the findings of the thorough review outlined in the report above. Once prepared, it is proposed that the amended DCP will be exhibited in accordance with the EP&A Regulation. A post-exhibition report, discussing submissions received and any proposed changes to the draft amendments, will be presented to Council for consideration.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Council Peer Review - Economic Impact Assessment

2.

Council Peer Review - Traffic Report

3.

Council Peer Review - Urban Design

4.

Proponent - Amended DCP November 18

5.

Proponent - Design Response to Peer Review

6.

Proponent - Economic Impact Assessment

7.

Proponent - Original Masterplan

8.

Proponent - Traffic Report

9.

Proponent - Review of changing Club requirements

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 16

Subject:         Amendment to Ashfield LEP 2013 - Heritage Conservation Clauses           

Prepared By:     Con Colot - Senior Strategic Planner & Projects 

Authorised By:  David Birds - Group Manager Strategic Planning

 

SUMMARY

This report seeks Council approval to carry out “housekeeping amendments” to the Ashfield Local Environmental Plan (ALEP) 2013 to delete an exempt development clause in Schedule 2 which applies to external building works within Heritage Conservation Areas and to Heritage Items.  This is in order to resolve misinterpretation of the clause and prevent potential adverse work being carried without Council approval to these places which is incompatible with their heritage significance. The existing clause 5.10 of ALEP 2013 will be able to be continued to be used for carrying out minor work without requiring development consent. 

 

Given the proposed amendment to the ALEP 2013 it is also proposed to make an amendment to subdivision clause 4.1A to ensure Heritage Items have an allotment configuration which is consistent with their heritage significance by having the required open space curtilage setting and lot size.

 

The report proposes Council forwards the Planning Proposal for the above to the Department of Planning and Environment and seeks delegation to become the Planning Proposal Authority for the making of the ALEP 2013 amendments.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT:

 

1          The attached Planning Proposal for amendments to the Ashfield Local Environmental Plan 2013, Schedule 2 - Exempt Development as indicated in the report be forwarded to the Minister for Planning for a Gateway Determination in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979;

 

2          The Department of Planning and Environment be requested to delegate the plan             making functions for the Planning Proposal to Council to be made the Planning             Proposal Authority;

 

3          Following receipt of a Gateway Determination, the Planning Proposal in the form required and supporting documentation be placed on public exhibition by Council for a minimum of 28 days and public authorities be consulted in accordance with the Determination; and

 

4          A report be presented to Council on completion of the public exhibition which             will address submissions received.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Before the Ashfield Local Environmental Plan 2013 (ALEP) the Ashfield Local Environmental Plan 1985 required development consent for all external alterations to buildings and sites within Heritage Conservation Areas (HCAs) and to Heritage Items (HIs). For very simple works the Ashfield LEP 1985 contained a clause that enabled Council to issue letters to building owners permitting such work to be carried out without requiring development consent - such as painting or minor repairs.

 

The exhibition of the draft ALEP, as part of the strategy of the former Ashfield Council, included an “exempt development” clause for minor alterations to external parts of buildings in HCAs and HIs. Exempt development allows work to be carried out without development approval by Council. This was in the context that there were 30 new HCAs being proposed, many additional HIs, and this initiative responded to community concerns that newly affected building owners should be able to carry out “minor work” without delay.

The Council drafted and exhibited ALEP exempt development clause is contained in Attachment 1.  It had been carefully worded to ensure that it strictly applied to “minor work” and adequately described such work.  For example:  painting already approved painted surfaces with the same colour (e.g. fences), replacing gutters with the same type and colour, making repairs to existing rendered surfaces by reinstating what was already there, or making repairs to building components such as windows or paving or fences.

 

However without prior feedback or notice being given to the former Ashfield Council the ALEP 2013 was gazetted in December 2013 with the exempt development clause having been significantly redrafted by Parliamentary Counsel. This resulted in the deletion of the key restrictions and limitations contained in the exhibited Council version for minor alterations that would have fully protected the significance of those places. The following clause was included in the LEP in Schedule 2 that allows exempt development to exteriors of buildings within Heritage Conservation Areas and Heritage Items where they are classed as “minor alterations”:

 

ALEP 2013

Exempt Development, Schedule 2:

 

Minor alterations (external) to buildings comprising heritage items or in a heritage conservation area

Must only involve one or more of the following:

(a)  painting, plastering or cement rendering,

(b)  the repair or replacement of a non-structural wall or roof cladding,

(c)  the replacement or maintenance of downpipes or roof guttering,

(d)  other non-structural alterations involving plumbing, electrical works, attaching fittings, restoration and decorative work.

 

 

In January 2014 Council officers contacted the Department of Planning of Environment (DPE) and highlighted problems with the wording imposed in the LEP and the potential ambiguous interpretation given the removal of the of the Council version of the description of the works and reliance on the term “minor”.

 

DPE responded they would not correct this and that Council should advise the public that it only applied to “minor development” as loosely defined in the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 at the time, and for Council officers to determine what “minor development” constituted on a case by case basis.  This was noted but for cautionary reasons the former Ashfield Council Planning and Environment Department insisted in the majority of cases that development applications be lodged, with the Council policy being not to charge any development application fee.

 

Former Ashfield Council was aware of the need to amend the ALEP 2013 to address the situation.  To partly address this until such time as there was an ALEP amendment, provisions were put in the Inner West Development Control Plan 2016 (process commenced earlier in 2015 and applies to Ashfield area) in Part E1 – 1.4 to provide a definition of “minor development”, however this does not provide certainty for this process. As a result of the Council amalgamation in May 2016 the ALEP amendment has been included on the list of projects to undertake. It has also has been highlighted by Development Assessment and Regulatory Services that the ALEP amendment is required to ensure there is certainty and clear rules about what the procedures are for carrying out minor alterations without development consent, and to avoid legal disputes.

 

Significantly an alternate current pathway exists to enable minor alterations by property owners without a Development Application which is in Clause 5.10 of the ALEP 2013 described below.

 

Need for Planning Proposal

 

Deletion of Schedule 2 - Exempt Development clause applying to HCAs and HIs

 

Noting the very sensitive nature of HCAs and HIs it is necessary to ensure there is no misinterpretation or misapplication of the ALEP 2013 exemption clause, and that external alterations are carried out appropriately in accordance with the necessary heritage conservation design details.  It is therefore proposed that the above “exempt development” clause be deleted from the Ashfield LEP 2013. In place of this Council will be able to continue to assist property owners to carry out minor work alterations by utilising the provisions of Clause 5.10 (3) of the Ashfield LEP 2013 as explained below. 

 

Clause 5.10 (3) of the Ashfield LEP 2013 below enables property owners to seek an exemption from any requirements for a development application and approval by submitting a letter (or email) to Council with supporting material. As explained earlier this was a previous practise of the former Ashfield Council. For example if there was a historic fence or parts of a building that needed to be repainted or to have repair work, a property owner would submit a short descriptive letter and photograph indicating the colour. Council would then simply respond by letter (or email) that the described work was satisfactory and did not require approval.

 

ALEP 2013

5.10   Heritage conservation

(3) When consent not required

 

However, development consent under this clause is not required if:

 

(a)  the applicant has notified the consent authority of the proposed development and the consent authority has advised the applicant in writing before any work is carried out that it is satisfied that the proposed development:

(i)  is of a minor nature or is for the maintenance of the heritage item, Aboriginal object, Aboriginal place of heritage significance or archaeological site or a building, work, relic, tree or place within the heritage conservation area, and

(ii)  would not adversely affect the heritage significance of the heritage item, Aboriginal object, Aboriginal place, archaeological site or heritage conservation area

 

To assist with the use and implementation of the above clause it is recommended Council develops a policy that provides clear guidance on procedures, the “minor work” it applies to, acceptable design criteria and documentation standards. This policy should be produced in collaboration with Council’s Heritage Adviser. Use and reference of numerous Ashfield area specific documents will also be able to be relied on, such as main street paint schemes for existing town centres, architectural detailing for houses and particular building styles and building components (fences, gates, verandahs etc). Council officers would also provide a report and draft policy document for Council’s consideration.

 

Council should also note that it has resolved (July 2017) to pursue a nomination proposal to list the Haberfield Conservation Area as a pre-eminent example of the Garden Suburb on the State Heritage Register.  In this context it is important that the above ALEP 2013 clause anomalies be addressed to demonstrate that adequate controls are in place as this will be one of the considerations by the Office and Environment and Heritage for the listing. 

 

 

Heritage Items and appropriate lot size

 

Clause 4.1A of the Ashfield LEP 2013 below was an initiative of the former Ashfield Council to increase housing supply and choice by enabling torrens title subdivision of house lots to permit semi-detached houses (i.e. one house attached to the other with a common wall),  such as 500 sqm house lots divided into two lots.  This was to occur within approx. 200 m of the train line so as to be within close vicinity to public transport with those locations being on “Area 1” on the Ashfield LEP 2013 Lot Size map.  It was not intended that Clause 4.1A apply to HCAs or HIs.

 

The Ashfield LEP 2013 contains a significant omission in Clause 4.1A (below) with this clause not containing a prohibition on Heritage Item properties being able to have small lot torrens title subdivision for detached houses down to 200 sqm. Many of the HIs affected in “Area 1” are in zones where detached housing is not permissible, e.g. being parks or schools. However there are some properties in “Area 1” where the land use zoning permits detached housing. For HIs small lot subdivision cannot be consistent with the heritage significance of their site. HIs need to have the required open space curtilage setting, lot size and lot boundary position in relation to the heritage item building.

 

Council should use this Ashfield LEP 2013 amendment opportunity to correct this situation by adding reference to a heritage item in clause (2) below as indicated in bold underline. This would make it fully consistent with established Heritage Conservation practice.

 

 

4.1A   Exceptions to minimum subdivision lot size for certain residential development

 

(1)  The objective of this clause is to encourage housing diversity without adversely affecting residential amenity.

 

(2)  Despite clause 4.1 (3), development consent may be granted to the subdivision of land identified as “Area 1” on the Lot Size Map that is not within a heritage conservation area, and that is not a heritage item, if:

(a)  each lot resulting from the subdivision will be at least 200 square metres, and

(b)  a semi-detached dwelling is or will be located on each lot, and

(c)  each lot will have a minimum street frontage of 7 metres.

(3)  Despite clause 4.1 (3), development consent may be granted to the subdivision of land identified as “Area 2” on the Lot Size Map if:

(a)  each lot resulting from the subdivision will be used for the purpose of a dwelling house, and

(b)  each lot resulting from the subdivision will be at least 174 square metres, but will not exceed 450 square metres, and

(c)  the total number of lots on that land will not exceed 11.

 

 

A Planning Proposal document for the above is contained in Attachment 2 to enable Council to proceed with the LEP amendments.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

Council’s long standing Heritage adviser for the former Ashfield Council area has been heavily involved in development assessments, has been consulted and advises he supports the amendments. Council’s General Counsel has been consulted in the preparation of this proposal.

The General Manager has determined that pursuant to the Local Planning Panel Directions – Planning Proposals that the LEP amendment is of minor significance - as contained in Attachment 3 and procedurally this enables Council to seek a Gateway Determination. 

 

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Not applicable at this stage. Public consultation will occur after Gateway Determination.

 

CONCLUSION

Ashfield LEP 2013 should delete in Schedule 2 - Exempt Development,  the clause  - “Minor alterations (external) to buildings comprising heritage items or in a heritage conservation area” as recommended in the report in order to adequately protect the heritage significance of those places.

 

Council should develop a policy document outlining which works can be carried without Council approval in accordance with Clause 5.10 (3) of the Ashfield LEP and procedures for this to assist property owners to make minor external alterations without development consent. This policy document should be produced in collaboration with Council’s heritage adviser. Council officers should then provide a report and draft document for Council’s approval.

 

Clause 4.1A (2)  of the Ashfield LEP 2013 should be amended to delete reference to Heritage Items having small lot torrens title subdivision as indicated in the report.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Draft ALEP 2012  Exempt Development Clause

2.

Planning Proposal

3.

General Manager Declaration

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 


 


 


Council Meeting

11 December 2018

 

Item No:         C1218(1) Item 17

Subject:         Amendment to Inner West DCP 2016 for 2-6 Cavill Avenue Ashfield           

Prepared By:     Con Colot - Senior Strategic Planner & Projects 

Authorised By:  David Birds - Group Manager Strategic Planning

 

SUMMARY

Council considered a supplementary report and resolved on 6 November 2018 to support and progress a Planning Proposal at 2-6 Cavill Avenue, Ashfield for amendments to the Ashfield Local Environmental Plan 2013 as reported to the Council meeting of 24 July 2018. This report also approved an associated site specific draft development control plan amendment. 

 

To enable the DCP amendment to legally come into force, this report seeks that Council clarify that it formally resolves to adopt for 2-6 Cavill Avenue, Ashfield the site specific amendments to the “Inner West Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2016 for Ashbury, Ashfield, Croydon, Croydon Park, Haberfield, Hurlstone Park and Summer Hill” (DCP 2016) as reported and considered at the Council meeting of 24 July 2018.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT Council adopt the site specific amendments for 2-6 Cavill Avenue, Ashfield to the “Inner West Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2016 for Ashbury, Ashfield, Croydon, Croydon Park, Haberfield, Hurlstone Park and Summer Hill” (DCP) as recommended in the report to Council of 24 July 2018 on the Planning Proposal and DCP for the site, and:

 

a)         Carry out the procedures under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 for making the amendment to the Development Control Plan; and

b)         Place an advertisement in the local newspaper advising that Council has adopted the amendments to the Development Control Plan, which will come into force in the event and at the time Planning Proposal PP_2017_IWEST_012_00 LEP amendment for 2-6 Cavill Avenue Ashfield is published on the Legislation website.

 

 

 

 

 

Council considered a report (Attachment 1) on 24 July 2018 on the Planning Proposal to make amendments to the Ashfield LEP 2013 at 2-6 Cavill Avenue Ashfield. This mostly pertained to increasing the Maximum Floor Space Ratio from 2.0:1 to 3.0:1 and applying a 7m building height bonus above the existing 23 m Maximum Building Height, so as to have the same controls that applied to most sites in the Ashfield Town Centre zoned B4-Mixed Use. That report (in its Part 4) also dealt with the exhibition of an associated site specific amendment to DCP 2016 - this being necessary in order to have controls in place when the LEP amendment is made to respond to any potential development application.

Council did not raise any objection to the report’s recommendations including those for the site specific amendment to the Inner West DCP 2016. However Council deferred progressing the Planning Proposal (LEP amendment) in order to seek a supplementary report to consider alternate options for the provision of affordable housing and whether to apply the Inner West Affordable Housing Policy 2017. This supplementary report was considered on 6 November 2018.  Council then resolved to support the Planning Proposal on 6 November 2018 as indicated in the 24 July 2018 report recommendation in Attachment 1 and to progress it to the final stages for the making of the LEP amendment, as follows:

THAT Council:

1.   Note this report and proceeds to amend Ashfield Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013 now as indicated in the report to Council 24 July 2018, and implement the requirements of Clause 4.3A of the LEP by having future development consent conditions that ensure affordable housing is provided for management by a community housing provider while remaining in the ownership of the developer or successor; and

2.   Resolves that for sites within “Area 1” in the Ashfield Town Centre identified on the Maximum Height of Building Map, where development is approved pursuant to Clause 4.3 A (3) of the Ashfield Local Environmental Plan 2013, Council confirms that  development consent conditions should be applied to ensure affordable housing is achieved and appropriately managed by a registered community housing provider in perpetuity.

The above recommendation did not make it clear that Council adopts the amendments to DCP 2016 detailed in the report to Council 24 July 2014. A Council resolution is required for this in order for the amendments to come into force and the required notice to be placed beforehand in the local newspaper, in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

Concurrently with the actions in resolutions 1 and 2 above it is therefore necessary that Council formally resolve to explicitly state they adopt the amendments to Inner West DCP 2016 as recommended in the Council report of 24 July 2018 (Attachment 1).

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Nil.

 

OTHER STAFF COMMENTS

 

Council’s General Counsel has confirmed the recommendation of this report is necessary for the adoption of the DCP 2016 amendments.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.

Council Report 24 July 2018 and draft DCP

  


Council Meeting

11 December 2018